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Rythmic gymnastics
Should it be an Olympic sport?


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#51 Expelliarmus

Posted 11 August 2012 - 10:50 AM

I'm not dissing BMX. On the contrary actually. If BMX as a variant of cycling can be included then rhythmic gymnastics as a variant of gymnastics can be included.

Simple.

#52 Gangnam Style

Posted 11 August 2012 - 10:52 AM

QUOTE (BadCat @ 10/08/2012, 10:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think calling it gymnastics is a bit dodgy.  Call it what is is - dance with props.


It's not dance. It's tricks.

#53 somila

Posted 11 August 2012 - 10:59 AM

QUOTE (BadCat @ 11/08/2012, 10:13 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Whereas with rhythmic gymnastics they've taken out almost everything that makes gymnastics what it is.  They've taken a floor routine, taken out the tumbling runs, increased the dance elements, and added a prop.


The ball, clubs, ribbon and hoop are each referred to as "apparatus" rather than "prop", I believe.  

Yes there is a fine line - and I think rhythmic gymnastics is inside that line.

I agree with BadCat - if you don't like it, don't watch it.  For many people strength, agility, flexibility, timing and even synchronisation are athletic pursuits as long as they involve gross motor skills.  Even if they have sparkles.

#54 BadCat

Posted 11 August 2012 - 11:35 AM

Props.  Apparatus.  Whatever.  laughing2.gif

Rhythmic gymnastics is borderline for me, but on the wrong side of the line.

Synch swimming is way on the wrong side of the line for me though. And yes, I know it's skillful and they're really fit and all, but I just find it too weird to bother with.  Actually I did manage to give it a fair trial some number of olympics ago, but they really lost me when they announced the solo sychronised swimming.  WTF?  Synchronised with their imaginary friends?  Synchronised watches?  Synchronised chromomesh gears inside the robot swimmers?  What on earth were they thinking with that one?  laughing2.gif

Don't get me wrong though, I'm super impressed with anyone who is at an olympic level in any sport, whether I like the sport or not.

Edited by BadCat, 11 August 2012 - 11:36 AM.


#55 PixieVee

Posted 11 August 2012 - 11:43 AM

Ohh, I LOVE the Rythmic Gymnastics. I am not a hater of any sports on the Olympics really. As others have said, if I am not super interested then I just switch off.

I do wonder why syncronised swimming, rythmic gymnastics ec are in the Olympics but not Ballroom Dancing or other types of dance.

#56 Ant2131

Posted 11 August 2012 - 11:46 AM

The equestrian is actually my favourite of the olympic sports - the dedication, training, skill of both horse and rider are incredible and much less likely to have drug cheats involved

#57 Soontobegran

Posted 11 August 2012 - 12:08 PM

They are athletes for sure but I am not so sure you can call it a sport. The glitzy costumes and heavy make up IMO detract from the skill factor.

I did watch it thought...they are very clever original.gif

#58 Rosie R

Posted 11 August 2012 - 12:09 PM

I find watching the rhythmic gymnastics fascinating, so much skill involved and their muscle tone is amazing...clearly my DSD thought it was pretty impressive too since she hasn't stopped dancing around the house with a ribbon tied to a pencil all morning Tounge1.gif  

Love the BMX too, just finding it hard to be up at midnight to watch it.

I do struggle with Taekwondo though, tappity tap tap just doesn't work for me. Can't win them all though hey.

We're all probably not likely to love everything, I'll just tune into what suits me and not watch the rest wink.gif

Regardless of the sport though, I am very impressed with the discipline and skill the people who compete bring.

#59 Kalota

Posted 11 August 2012 - 12:12 PM

My DP and I were watching it last night and having the same conversation! We both really enjoyed watching it.

In the end, I think we both came to the conclusion that it IS classified as a sport... it requires a high level of fitness and amazing skill! As well as lots and lots and lots of training.

Those gymnasts must have amazing muscle control to do the things they do with such poise!

#60 Wild Strawberry

Posted 11 August 2012 - 12:45 PM

Rythmic Gymnastic is amazing to watch. My kids are amazed by it too. I would call it a sport.

As for BMX....LOVE it! Helps that my son races so he is into it also. So glad it is now an Olympic sport.

#61 Princess.cranky.pants

Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:05 PM

QUOTE
As for equestrian, apart from being a very difficult sport which requires as much training as anything else (it is certainly not just the horse's skill!) I love it as it is the only olympic sport that has men and women competing on equal terms.


I agree. I have watched most of the Equestrian (thanks Foxtel) and loved it. I am amazed at how skilled the riders are to get the horses to do what they do. And the horses just try so hard and give it everything.. just great to watch.

I don't watch BMX but it has more place in the Olympics than badminton! I don't think hitting a shuttlecock over a net is an Olympic sport! 3 or 4 badminton teams got chucked out of the games because they deliberately lost their matches so they would be up against and easy team in the next round. Disgusting. The Equestrian and Rhythmic Gymnastic athletes would not have that attitude.

#62 Niamh23

Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:59 PM

QUOTE (Unatheowl @ 11/08/2012, 09:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Haha, you and my dh would get along well!

Actually, he extrapolates this to the Paralympics too.  Either you're the fastest person in the world, or you're not, for whatever reason.  He doesn't like the "I'm not a good runner so I'll be the best of the runners who aren't very good" thing.


Seriously??!!  huh.gif

#63 canuckmel

Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:11 PM

QUOTE (Unatheowl @ 11/08/2012, 09:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Actually, he extrapolates this to the Paralympics too.  Either you're the fastest person in the world, or you're not, for whatever reason.  He doesn't like the "I'm not a good runner so I'll be the best of the runners who aren't very good" thing.


.........the f**k did I just read?

#64 Magnus

Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:25 PM

I just watched it for the first time and I have to admit I wondered where all the gymnastics moves went. Some of the routines I saw seemed a lot more like dance, then others seemed more like artistic gymnastics and others seemed like contortion. I guess I was suprised because when I was doing all levels dance classes at my local, non fancy dance studio many of the advanced students could do a lot of those moves as part of a sequence in a similar sort of way. But then I don't really understand how it's evaluated and a lot of those dance students had been doing dance since they were about four too. I think it should be an Olympic sport and obviously they are very highly skilled, but it shocked me at first because it seemed so different and not really like a variant of gymnastics at all.

The fun thing about watching it was that for me it was really the choreography that made it an interesting viewing experience rather than the skill levels (as I couldn't really predict who would score higher). In artistic gymnastics and diving I found it pretty easy to pick who had competed better and it was much more impressive to watch the teams that were scoring very highly as you could clearly see the difference in skill levels.

#65 Gumbette

Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:33 PM

QUOTE (Unatheowl @ 11/08/2012, 09:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Actually, he extrapolates this to the Paralympics too.  Either you're the fastest person in the world, or you're not, for whatever reason.  He doesn't like the "I'm not a good runner so I'll be the best of the runners who aren't very good" thing.

Does he agree with Olympic competition being divided according to gender then, or does the woman (Fraser-Pryce) who won the 100 metre sprint need to be as fast as Bolt otherwise she's only considered to be "the best of the runners who aren't very good"?

#66 BetteBoop

Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:36 PM

QUOTE (Niamh23 @ 11/08/2012, 01:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Seriously??!!  huh.gif



QUOTE (canuckmel @ 11/08/2012, 02:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
.........the f**k did I just read?


Thirded.

If anything, I think the achievements of athletes with a disability are more impressive because they don't get the money, support or opportunities that able bodied athletes do. It stuns me that anyone would completely dismiss them because they aren't physically perfect humans.

#67 Unatheowl

Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:46 PM

QUOTE (Gumbette @ 11/08/2012, 02:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Does he agree with Olympic competition being divided according to gender then, or does the woman (Fraser-Pryce) who won the 100 metre sprint need to be as fast as Bolt otherwise she's only considered to be "the best of the runners who aren't very good"?


I don't know, I've never had the discussion with him.  He doesn't dismiss disabled people, it's not that.  He just thinks they should compete with everyone else.  If they win, then all power to them.

#68 Expelliarmus

Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:51 PM

I think in some cases it's possible to compete together but in other cases it's really not. The South African Runner on blades for example - this is something where I think we should be really investigating and enabling the inclusion of the sports. I am sure there are other times we could be inclusive as well. I am thinking of that blind Chinese(?) athlete - was he a swimmer?

But you can't really practice inclusion with things like (wheelchair) basketball or that hand cycle track thingy because there's the element of equality. If it can't be made equal, then it can't be included. But I do question whether at this time and place we still need a parallel olympics. Can we integrate the games themselves even if we don't practice inclusion where it's impossible?

Edited by howdo, 11 August 2012 - 02:54 PM.


#69 Unatheowl

Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:58 PM

I dont know.  He has a view that the Olympics should be more objective rather than subjective.  If you throw the furthest then you are the winner whether you have two arms or one.

He doesn't think disabled people have no place in sport, arent't great athletes or are not human or whatever other conclusions you may have jumped to without thinking biggrin.gif

Don't know what my view is really.  I just kind of accept the wacky "sports" because that's how it is.  My feelings on the topic are very meh.  I love gymnastics, do I think it's a sport?  Don't know - does it matter?.  As forth Paralympics, I find it difficult to see how they can create a level playing field.

Edited by Unatheowl, 11 August 2012 - 03:03 PM.


#70 Expelliarmus

Posted 11 August 2012 - 03:01 PM

I disagree with that because of the variables. If you are going to be affected in some way - eg. balance by having only the one arm then it's not a fair contest.

Is it better to have two sets of competitions or have handicaps on the one set? Interesting question.

FWIW though we tried to go to a Paralympic Games session in Sydney - the TV dudes said head on down, get your ticket at the gate - and got there to find it sold out - so they *are* attended. We thought it'd be easy enough to get a ticket!

#71 JRA

Posted 11 August 2012 - 03:28 PM

QUOTE (Princess.cranky.pants @ 11/08/2012, 09:56 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Rhythmic gymnastics is physically demanding but any sport that requires music, sequins and stage makeup - for me- crosses the line from sport to performance.

That rules out Ice Skating in the winter Olympics. Which is one of the most popular events at the Winter games.


Yes, we were talking about this last night. I think the rhythmic is impressive, but the whole make up etc drives me bananas. But we then decided that the ice dancing, as compared to ice skating is not that different.

QUOTE (PatG @ 11/08/2012, 10:07 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As for equestrian, apart from being a very difficult sport which requires as much training as anything else (it is certainly not just the horse's skill!) I love it as it is the only olympic sport that has men and women competing on equal terms.

This is my standard story. A friend was due to compete at the olympics, some years back, and got the letter to turn up at XYZ to have her "sex test" to check that she was actually a girl.  Before the date arrived she got another letter saying she didn't need it as she was competing in equestrian and it didn't' matter.

QUOTE (Ant2131 @ 11/08/2012, 11:46 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The equestrian is actually my favourite of the olympic sports - the dedication, training, skill of both horse and rider are incredible and much less likely to have drug cheats involved

You have no idea how many people in some equestrian disciplines for using drugs on their horses.


#72 Niamh23

Posted 11 August 2012 - 03:34 PM

QUOTE (Magnus @ 11/08/2012, 02:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I just watched it for the first time and I have to admit I wondered where all the gymnastics moves went. Some of the routines I saw seemed a lot more like dance, then others seemed more like artistic gymnastics and others seemed like contortion. I guess I was suprised because when I was doing all levels dance classes at my local, non fancy dance studio many of the advanced students could do a lot of those moves as part of a sequence in a similar sort of way. But then I don't really understand how it's evaluated and a lot of those dance students had been doing dance since they were about four too.


In that case, I look forward to seeing those students from your dance studio competing at the 2016 Olympics.

#73 Magnus

Posted 11 August 2012 - 03:49 PM

QUOTE (Niamh23 @ 11/08/2012, 03:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
In that case, I look forward to seeing those students from your dance studio competing at the 2016 Olympics.


I think they'd actually be too old, unfortunately. A lot of the people who attended the classes were in their late twenties or older. They could do the same skills based on lots of years of dance training, but I've got no idea how well they did them as I'm very uncoordinated and it all looks impressive to me!

Edited by Magnus, 11 August 2012 - 03:52 PM.


#74 prettypenny

Posted 11 August 2012 - 04:22 PM

I did artistic gymnastics (the original or proper gymnastics if you will) growing up and rhythmic gymnastics was viewed as the poor cousin. Sort of what you went into if you sustained an injury doing real gymnastics.

I think it's closer to Calisthenics than gymnastics though. That said, it is super hard, requiring excellent strength, balance, flexibility co ordination etc. So definitely a sport, just not one I choose to watch.

I think any sport where the Olympics aren't the ultimate achievement shouldn't be there. So in the case of tennis, winning Wimbledon is deemed the ultimate achievement therefore shouldn't be in the Olympics.

#75 Soontobegran

Posted 11 August 2012 - 04:30 PM

QUOTE (howdo @ 11/08/2012, 03:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
FWIW though we tried to go to a Paralympic Games session in Sydney - the TV dudes said head on down, get your ticket at the gate - and got there to find it sold out - so they *are* attended. We thought it'd be easy enough to get a ticket!


We have an excellent and elite wheelchair basketball competition here in Victoria and the games are usually sold out, in fact they often get more to watch them than the run of the mill able bodied basketball.




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