Jump to content

Was BFing hard for you ?
At 6 weeks


  • Please log in to reply
72 replies to this topic

#26 ubermum

Posted 21 September 2012 - 11:26 PM

Three kids and I have had trouble with each of them.

Number 1- attachment issues in hospital, low weight and possible undiagnosed tongue tie. I was encouraged to give a bottle. I gave EBM. Baby never learned to feed properly and had EBM until I fell pregnant with no.2 at 8 months and was unable to maintain supply.

Number 2- Complete tongue tie. Pain, so much pain but due to experience the first time, I was determined to perservere. Tongue tie finally diagnosed at 5 weeks and fixed at 6 weeks. Nipples healed by 7 weeks.

Number 3- Thrush. Antibiotics in the week before birth probably contributed. Toe curling pain and plenty of tears. Pharmacist eventually refused to sell me more Daktarin until I saw the doctor. Doctor told me to get more Daktarin. Then I found another solution online. Healed by about 7 weeks.

#27 mysonsmum

Posted 22 September 2012 - 12:02 AM

I really struggled with breastfeeding for the first 10 weeks (I was a real spaz & had to get into all kinds of funny positions to latch my son) but now I am super glad I stuck it out! I haven't read all the other posts but have u tried lanisoh? That was a god send for me. I remember just when my nipples were healing from when he savaged them in the days after he was born he had a growth spurt & tore them to shreds again & it would sting like crazy to latch him on but then they would go kind of numb while he was feeding but if my memory serves me correctly it didn't take long after that for them to feel much better. Either way I hope everything goes well for u x

#28 Franny Glass

Posted 22 September 2012 - 03:44 AM

Lots of pain... I had cracked and bleeding nipples for the first 4-6 weeks (hard to remember which, tis a blur!), attachment issues, feeds took over an hour, resorted to shield then more pain and damage when we ditched the shields at 10-12 weeks.

At 13 weeks, my daughter and I were feeding like pros. Painless ever since.

Best of luck with identifying what the issue is, it sounds really tough.

#29 mini mac

Posted 22 September 2012 - 04:03 AM

For DS1 I too had thrush on my breasts, probably caught from him being on anitbiotics and had thrush in his mouth and it took ages to clear. Ouch! Attachment issues, cracked nipples, bleeding, oh it was horrible with the thrush... and it was seriously hard work and tear worthy.

For DS2 (4 weeks now) has been a dream, no problems and enjoyable from the beginning

Whether or not to persist or give up is really a personal choice... I think you've worked so hard in a way giving up now would be silly, but its your boobs and your sanity we are talking about...

Good luck with whatever you do, do what feels right for you and don't worry about other opinions, its your body and your baby you're looking after

#30 winkywonkeydonkey

Posted 22 September 2012 - 07:16 AM

I got thrush at 6 weeks and almost quit breastfeeding. It was so painful i was in tears every feed! It took 3 weeks to completly get rid of it. How long did you do thrush treatment for?
I also had to wash all my bras in canestan laundry wash and i also cut out all sugar from my diet . Also i stopped using lansinoh and i would air dry after every feed and that how i eventually beat it!
To be honest red nipples and white spots sounds like thrush? maybe keep doing the treatment it can take weeks to get rid of it.

Edited by winkywonkeydonkey, 22 September 2012 - 07:18 AM.


#31 winkywonkeydonkey

Posted 22 September 2012 - 07:16 AM

dp

Edited by winkywonkeydonkey, 22 September 2012 - 07:16 AM.


#32 minidiamond

Posted 22 September 2012 - 07:22 AM

Thanks again everyone there are some really tough experiences ppl have been through.

Sadly last night was horrible.  I tried the shields (small as I have relatively small nipples but I'm not sure if they were right). He bit down so hard I screamed and just sat there crying from pain and frustration for 5 minutes while DH comforted DS.

I had about 60mls of ebm so I gave him that then opened the formula tin  :and comped him then expressed.  I fed him that expressed ebm this morning and some more top up and now in this little pattern, wondering if I should stick with that for a day.
We are supposed to go to a wedding today arrrgh
Soooo sore.

#33 Mummy fab

Posted 22 September 2012 - 07:32 AM

Dd1- was being tube fed in hospital breast milk topped up with formula and breast feeding her was an absolute nightmare. She was so little and didn't know which way her milk was coming by day 8 I was expressing and the bottle was full of blood I cried and cried and all I wanted was for someone to tell me it was ok to give her a bottle after all I had heard in hospital was breast feeding, breast feeding, breast feeding. She was formula fed from day 8 and that worked for her.

Dd2- again breastfed for around three weeks and the same things started happening really sore nipples etc so again switched to formula.

Dd3- 5 years later I had dd3 and after previous breast feeding problems I didn't have high hopes of it working but to my surprise it did, maybe I was more relaxed I have no idea but she has just turned 1 and I have just weaned her to one breastfed a day and switched to formula in the hopes it makes her sleep longer at night. I have never had sore breasts or sore nipples never any issues whatsoever this time around even now my milk supply has just become less and have never had any pain.

I don't know what the answer is but I think each child is different if you are in pain and have given it a shot don't feel guilty for changing to formula. Good luck!

#34 librablonde

Posted 22 September 2012 - 07:43 AM

Oh Liltuss, I'm so sorry you're going through this sad.gif As you know, I have no personal experience with BFing, but I watched my DP BF her son and I seem to remember it being really difficult for her up until about 3 months when it all just "clicked" for both of them. She BF him really well then up until 12 months when he decided to wean himself. I remember she always massaged BM into her nipples before and after each feed, and spent a great deal of time airing or massaging her nipples to strengthen them. She also expressed sometimes, but it was difficult. She mostly expressed in the shower to release the pressure in her breasts so DS could latch-on without a jet-stream hitting him in the face.

If comp feeding is what you have to do to get through this, then so be it. Don't feel guilty. You worked so hard to get your DS, he is so loved and wanted and adored, BF or FF or comp feeding will be a distant memory in a few years.

Have you read Ina May Gaskin's Guide To Breastfeeding? I have a copy and it looks like a great book, but of course, I can only speak in hypotheticals for myself right now. If you're anything like me, you've probably researched this issue to death anyways  wink.gif  Again, I wish it was smooth sailing for you and I hope it gets better soon xoxoxo You're in my thoughts, hon xoxoxox

#35 DM. 2012

Posted 22 September 2012 - 08:13 AM

I had blocked ducts a couple of times at about 5 and 7 weeks, only on 1 side. From memory, they coincided with when bub dropped a feed and went for a longer stretch between night feeds; and therefore the milk built up (your body learns to adjust to the reduced feeds) but wasn't getting drank for longer. It was very painful.
I managed to get it to clear up by massaging all over while having a hot shower and expressing some milk out. In between feeds I would use a heated wheat pack. The first time it lasted about 3 days and the 2nd lasted about 4. The 2nd time was worse than the first and On the last night I had 2 anti-inflamatory tablets (neurophin) and a hot bath, during the bath I massaged and tried to squeeze the blockage out. If you are using breast pads be sure to change them if they feel too moist.
Blocked ducts may lead to mastitis, so be sure to see a GP who can probably give you a course of anti-biotics because it seems as though you have done all the right things to try and clear it up without medication.
It's good that you are expressing even though you have given him some formula so that when you are feeling better he can go back to breast feeding.

Edited by Dylan's Mummu, 25 September 2012 - 11:28 PM.


#36 thorneth

Posted 22 September 2012 - 08:16 AM

Hi I wanted to share what happened to me with my ds at around 20 months. We had early issues with thrush but had been fine from around 4 months. Then at 20 months I had painful red nipples with flaking skin that were very easily cracked. It took a while to work out what was happening (at first I thought it was thrush again) but it turned out I had nipple psoriasis. I treated it with steroid cream for a while but couldn't do that for long periods. Lansinoh actually made it worse. I have ended up using breast shells to allow them to air and prevent rubbing and sweet almond oil applied after every feed to keep them moisturised (which is safe for bub so don't have to wash it off ). I'm still feeding him at 28 months now despite still having the psoriasis. Midnight be worth asking your lc about it?

#37 blessina

Posted 22 September 2012 - 08:29 AM

Hi,

It sounds like this is a really hard patch for you.  I hope it improves soon.

I see that until recently you haven't had a problem with attachment.  Has anything changed?  I just wondered if maybe you introduced a dummy or bottle before the nipple soreness started?  Maybe there is a degree of nipple confusion?

It's really tough.  After initial problems with badly cracked nipples with DD1, breastfeeding went smoothly.  Feeding DD2 was a breeze.  DD3 was prem, and I didn't have a pain free feed til she was 6 months corrected.  That said, it was more discomfort, rather than toe-curling pain, but it didn't settle down for a loooong time.  I considered weaning her several times, and TBH, still consider it on a fairly regular basis.  But breastfeeding is important to me, and she has allergies which make it a bit more complicated.

I hope you find a solution that works for you.

#38 lady lady

Posted 22 September 2012 - 08:41 AM

Hi OP - not sure if you are interested but this thread is pinned, but to answer your question - I found breastfeeding "challenging" for about the first 3-4 months ... http://www.essentialbaby.com.au/forums/ind...956018&st=0

I highly recommend an LC (if you have access to one),  they are the specialist in this area and are happy to help with all ages and stages of BF (not just the "early days") ...

#39 Pooks Combusted

Posted 22 September 2012 - 09:48 AM

QUOTE (Georgette47 @ 21/09/2012, 11:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I lose it. I am bereft. Lactation consultant admits that we will never have a normal BF relationship but that I could express for bub's first 12 months. I think to myself: shoot me now, please.


Oh Georgette. I got there for different reasons, and my supply went down to nothing in a matter of weeks, but this was exactly the same for me. Just couldn't do it.

OP, here's the thing. Some people could express full time. In fact, I've met women who've done it by choice, and others who've faced the challenge head on, and then there are people like me who find it not only horrible but ultimately fruitless as expressing just doesn't result in much milk. Well, not enough for my son to live off anyway.

What I'm trying to say is that for some people, something will be horrible, for others easy; there is a spectrum of quite understandable responses to any human experience. Only you know what is right for you- only you have the ability to truly weigh up pros and cons in your situation. I wish you all the best. I think the suggestion of taking it day by day is a really good one, and please make sure you're taking care of yourself because I know how stressful this can be.

#40 Fright bat

Posted 22 September 2012 - 10:05 AM

I wish there was a happy medium in which we (as a society) could encourage and support breastfeeding and it always be considered the first option, but also not push it to the point where women feel horrible and guilty at the very thought of stopping and twist themselves into knots and tolerate severe pain and emotional turmoil to try and keep it up.

This is just a musing. I understand that at a population level we shouldn't be saying 'oh just give up if its a bit hard and put babies on formula' because then we risk reverting to the days when formula was the first option. And lots of women (like me) did push through some discomfort and are really happy we did (if I had been given than message 5 months ago, I wouldn't still be breastfeeding DS2, and I am genuinely glad I persisted). But for some people it never gets better, or that period of pain is intolerable for whatever reason; they are the ones should should be able to stop guilt free before they end up with PND etc.

I honestly don''t know how you pitch a public health message at the challenging middle ground.

Anyway, OP, as others have said, its your choice, and ony you know how much you can tolerate. I was ready to lose it with cracked nipples and thrush; we worked on attachment, took meds, and I asked on here if we got it right, how long it would take for my nipples to heal - I was told 2 weeks. So I set myself that time period, telling myself that if it hadn't gotten better in two weeks, then I would stop and put bub on formula (it wasn't good for me or our relationship that I would cry just about every time he needed to feed). I got rapidly better after working on our attachment, and in about 10 days I was healed, so we kept feeding. But I knew I couldn't have done it another six weeks to get to that point, if that makes sense.

Maybe set yourself a similar time period, whatever you feel you can manage (1 week? 3 weeks? whatever) - that way the idea of this dragging on for months doesn't make you despair.

#41 StopTheGoats

Posted 22 September 2012 - 10:16 AM

I want to give you a hug OP sad.gif
Breastfeeding was very difficult for me. I had large cysts in my breasts and recurring mastitis which interrupted supply. I had supply issues from day 1. At five months I realised I was spending so much time in specialists offices, I was dreading every feed, I was basically feeding every waking moment (breastfeeding up to 40 mins, pumping for 30 mins, topping up, washing equipment, drinking tea, making cookies attending meetings) and doing this every 2.5-3 hours) that I was neglecting to nurture the rest of my son and I'd given up on myself. I've never been one to accept failure and it really got me down. At 5 months I'd had enough and started to comp feed. I stopped using the pump completely at 6 months and my final breastfeed was the day he turned 7 months. It was awful and I regret not switching to formula sooner.

#42 JoMarch

Posted 22 September 2012 - 10:41 AM

You are not alone!  I have had/am still having feelings of "is this worth it?" "Should I move on..." at 8 weeks.  But in saying that, it is getting easier (slowly)!  I am setting myself really short goals, eg my goal at the moment is to make it to 3 months, so only another 4 weeks.  If at that point I'm still getting blocked ducts/thrush/mastitis/am feeling unhappy, we will switch to formula.  I am battling thrush at the moment and for me it goes between pain and itching.  We are using Daktarin gel.  Do you get "needle" type pain shooting through your boobs after a feed?  Cos this is one of the symptoms of thrush, which I have also been getting.  

It is completely up to you if you persist with BFing, but seeing as you say you haven't had troubles right from the start, maybe once you get the thrush (or whatever it is) under control you might be able to keep going? If not, DON'T beat yourself up, you have given it a really good go!! To get to 6 weeks is such a great job and you say your little one has had their 6 week immunisations, so I think you should be really proud to have made it this far.  I do agree that "breast is best", but the message it sends to new mums trying to give BFing a go can make us so hard on ourselves, and put ourselves through absolute hell just for the sake of BFing.  Being a happy/nurturing mum to our babies should be our number 1 goal, not putting ourselves through the ringer to breastfeed.  Great if it works out, but not the end of the world if it doesn't.  original.gif  

Hope you can get a definate diagnosis of what's going on with the pain...

Good luck! original.gif

#43 minidiamond

Posted 22 September 2012 - 11:31 AM

Thank you so much to everyone

I promise I won't turn this into a running commentary of every feed but for his 9am feed I just laid down with him in bed skin to skin and decided to grit my teeth. It hurt, but it was bearable and he had a nice feed, no fussing and the relief afterwards was massive. Boobs themselves (as opposed to nipples) feel so much better than expressing which makes them all over the shop.

I'll try to use my bigger morning supply to express and build up an emergency stash of ebm and plan on going to my local health area drop in clinic first thing Monday. Then will be finding myself a proper LC to sit down and watch me feed.

A good BF session is so good, a bad one is horrid but I'm going to keep persisting for now.  As the gorgeous librablonde said, Dh and I fought hard to have this little monkey, with 9 IVF transfers, so I'm determined not going to give up too easily.

Sitting outside on a gorgeous day, bathing my nipples in breastmilk and sunlight and thanks many of your responses, feeling a lot better

Edited by Liltuss, 22 September 2012 - 12:45 PM.


#44 lucky 2

Posted 22 September 2012 - 12:32 PM

QUOTE (Liltuss @ 22/09/2012, 07:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks again everyone there are some really tough experiences ppl have been through.

Sadly last night was horrible.  I tried the shields (small as I have relatively small nipples but I'm not sure if they were right). He bit down so hard I screamed and just sat there crying from pain and frustration for 5 minutes while DH comforted DS.

I had about 60mls of ebm so I gave him that then opened the formula tin  :and comped him then expressed.  I fed him that expressed ebm this morning and some more top up and now in this little pattern, wondering if I should stick with that for a day.
We are supposed to go to a wedding today arrrgh
Soooo sore.

I have read the next feed was better, yay, and you are feeling a little bit better.
And btw, you can give us a blow by blow account of each feed if you want, no rule against it original.gif.
As you can see many pp's relate.
I'd forgotten that it did take about 3 months before bfing was "easy".

But in regards to the nipple shield, your nipple needs to have some space to move into the shield and bring the areola with it otherwise your nipple will not be deep in the mouth and baby can not suckle normally and removed milk. I cant see that happening with a small shield.
There is abit of art and skill to their use, hence best used with a LC or other knowledgeable person.
I've only used a small with a prem and very rarely.
I'm not convinced a shield will "value add" in your situation but if you try it again consider medium and most often large is used.
But again, shields work best for women with short or inverted/retracted nipples and not so much with usual length nipples, ie babies can usually grasp the breast better when nipples are everted and they are not needed.
All the best..



#45 Franny Glass

Posted 22 September 2012 - 12:34 PM

Sounds like a great plan OP, hope the clinic on Monday is helpful and best of luck with the LC.

#46 bambiigrrl

Posted 22 September 2012 - 12:42 PM

oh sweetie i know how your feeling!! i had the exact same problem for the first two weeks of my dd life and it was sooo hard! i dreaded it too. but my friends insisted i keep trying and i finally got it right and my nipples healed and i loved it sooo much, its definatly worth it babe keep trying!

its sounds to me like your not getting the attatchment right, and dont forget your nipples really have to be worn in and toughened up, and they will!

id keep working on your positioning and attchment and it will get better eventually then you will love breastfeeding. i found the best position for me was laying down on my side to feed, if you havnt tried that i def reccomend. trust me bottle feeding at that age is a pain in the ass compared to breastfeeding, i had to for a few week and i hated it and was glad once i could reintroduce the breast again, it really is better for mum and bubs espeshally in the first 6 months. good luck!!!!!
bbighug.gif

#47 ~katiez~

Posted 22 September 2012 - 12:45 PM

Please do give us a feed by feed account if it helps in any way - 200 years ago we all would have been helping you by the camp fire so embrace this virtual mummy village original.gif

I found small goals helped me - like, maybe make a goal to keep breastfeeding until Monday? If you do, then celebrate on Monday and regroup and make another goal. Keep them small though - 2 days seems way more manageable than 2 months. Also have you tried taking a Panadol before a feed? If it takes the edge off the pain it is worth it!

#48 lucky 2

Posted 22 September 2012 - 12:47 PM

QUOTE (~katiez~ @ 22/09/2012, 12:45 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Please do give us a feed by feed account if it helps in any way - 200 years ago we all would have been helping you by the camp fire so embrace this virtual mummy village original.gif

I hadn't thought of it like that, what a great way to look at it original.gif .


#49 livvie7586

Posted 22 September 2012 - 12:53 PM

OP, i'm with MsN on this one.  if you can work out the issues, great, but if it comes down to happily bottlefeeding your baby and building a great relationship with him, or breastfeeding and dreading every times he cries for a feed, then go for the bottle.  Breastfeeding is important, but a happy mum and a happy, well fed baby is more important.

(and sometimes it does get easier, at other times it doesn't.  i had pain on and off for my entire 17 months of feeding DD, and i can still remember dreading feed time.  DS things got easier around 4 months)

#50 minidiamond

Posted 22 September 2012 - 04:00 PM

QUOTE (bambiigrrl @ 22/09/2012, 12:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
id keep working on your positioning and attchment and it will get better eventually then you will love breastfeeding. i found the best position for me was laying down on my side to feed, if you havnt tried that i def reccomend. trust me bottle feeding at that age is a pain in the ass compared to breastfeeding, i had to for a few week and i hated it and was glad once i could reintroduce the breast again, it really is better for mum and bubs espeshally in the first 6 months. good luck!!!!!
bbighug.gif

Yes, this was our two feeds this morning, not only is it more comfortable, he was very relaxed and not fussy.  I think I will aim to wake him just before he's due (feeds every 4 hours) so he's nice and sleepy attaches in a completely relaxed way.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.