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I dont get the whole no alcohol and breastfeeding thing


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#126 Soontobegran

Posted 20 October 2012 - 03:25 PM

QUOTE (Madame Catty @ 20/10/2012, 11:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
To the PP who said to 'pump and dump' - there is no reason to do this as the alcohol leaves your milk at the same rate as your blood eg about 1-2 hours after one drink you shouldn't have any alcohol in your blood or milk (depending on your weight, etc, etc)

I would have thought that alcohol would not be in the new milk that we produce once the alcohol has been processed by our body but the milk that had been sitting in the breast since drinking will still have alcohol in it.
After a heavy drinking session it should be pumped and dumped and allow the breasts to produce a fresh uncontaminated batch.
Breast milk does not have the benefit of being filtered by the liver.
That being said I think it is perfectly OK to have a few well timed alcoholic drinks when breastfeeding.



#127 niggles

Posted 20 October 2012 - 03:44 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 20/10/2012, 01:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would have thought that alcohol would not be in the new milk that we produce once the alcohol has been processed by our body but the milk that had been sitting in the breast since drinking will still have alcohol in it.
After a heavy drinking session it should be pumped and dumped and allow the breasts to produce a fresh uncontaminated batch.
Breast milk does not have the benefit of being filtered by the liver.
That being said I think it is perfectly OK to have a few well timed alcoholic drinks when breastfeeding.


That's not what it's said in one of the earlier links I read. Can't remember whose it was (perhaps the ABA link) but I read that alcohol leaves the breastmilk at the same rate it leaves the blood and that there is no need to pump and dump unless it's for comfort, or I guess to maintain supply if you are missing a feed you'd normally give. It's likely that alcohol in the milk can pass out into the bloodstream as the blood concentration drops. That would make sense to me in the highly vascular breast tissue.

#128 seepi

Posted 20 October 2012 - 04:21 PM

Yep - ABA state that the alcohol disappears on it's own from the milk over time. there is no need to pump and dump at all. .

apart from which. unless you have about 6 or more drinks, I dont' think there would even be any measureable level of alcohol in the milk anyway.

Say it takes about 4-6 drinks over a few hours, of 10% alcohol to get to 0.05. so baby drinks something that is 1/200th alcohol, if they have a feed at the worst possible time of about 2 hours after first drink. There would be more alcohol than that in desserts with a splalsh of vanilla essence,or in some cough mixutres but noone freaks out over that.

#129 MrsMammaB

Posted 20 October 2012 - 04:31 PM

Ok, can I ask - If I were to have a glass of wine when is the best time to do it? Ive had a glass with dinner here and there and have done it right after a feed. Is that best? Or during?! Clearly not a great look!

DD feeds every 2-3 hours.

#130 CallMeFeral

Posted 20 October 2012 - 04:38 PM

QUOTE (niggles @ 20/10/2012, 04:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That's not what it's said in one of the earlier links I read. Can't remember whose it was (perhaps the ABA link) but I read that alcohol leaves the breastmilk at the same rate it leaves the blood and that there is no need to pump and dump unless it's for comfort, or I guess to maintain supply if you are missing a feed you'd normally give. It's likely that alcohol in the milk can pass out into the bloodstream as the blood concentration drops. That would make sense to me in the highly vascular breast tissue.


Yes, that's what I've read too. It's not so much like milk sitting in your breast until it's emptied, but like a constant circulatory sort of thing happening with exchanges, such that the milk kind of represents where your body is at NOW.
I mean really if it WAS a first in first out sort of system, then you could get as p*ssed as you like and the first feed you did after that would still have no alcohol in it, because it had been sitting there from before you got drunk...

MammaB during or directly after the feed gives it the best chance of clearing out before the next feed. Depends on the length of the feed - I reckon with a newborn 1.5 hour feeder you'd be better to wait till after - but arguably with say a 10 min feeder then even slightly before the feed would do it!

#131 CallMeFeral

Posted 20 October 2012 - 04:42 PM

QUOTE (knottygirl @ 20/10/2012, 03:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The OP was talking about a blood alcohol level of 0.15%.  thats a lot more than a glass or two with dinner.


She used an extreme figure to give worst case scenario.
If she'd said two drinks, people would have gone "ah but you're assuming they stop at two..."
Can't win!

QUOTE (seepi @ 20/10/2012, 05:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
apart from which. unless you have about 6 or more drinks, I dont' think there would even be any measureable level of alcohol in the milk anyway.

Say it takes about 4-6 drinks over a few hours, of 10% alcohol to get to 0.05. so baby drinks something that is 1/200th alcohol, if they have a feed at the worst possible time of about 2 hours after first drink. There would be more alcohol than that in desserts with a splalsh of vanilla essence,or in some cough mixutres but noone freaks out over that.

No - you should probably go back to the calculation in the OP, to get a good feel of it. You are mixing up pure alcohol percentages with the alcohol content in stuff. Besides the fact that I BELIEVE vanilla essence and cough mixtures no longer contain alcohol... (could be wrong, but regardless cough mixtures are not recommended for kids under 4).

#132 seepi

Posted 20 October 2012 - 04:51 PM

It is confusing.... but the fact remains that the breastmilk level of alcohol is the same as the mother's blood level. Which even if you are tanked as anything is fairly low. 0.09 is not a level any alcoholic drinks are at.

I think directly after a feed is the easiest and safest way to go. IF you try to be clever and have a glass directly before a feed, there is bound to be some delay, or baby will sleep unexpectedly etc.

Straight after, and if you only have one it will be gone in an hour. If you have 2 it will be gone in 2 hours (rough figures, but this is what they say for driving.)





#133 Soontobegran

Posted 20 October 2012 - 07:55 PM

QUOTE (seepi @ 20/10/2012, 05:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yep - ABA state that the alcohol disappears on it's own from the milk over time. there is no need to pump and dump at all. .

apart from which. unless you have about 6 or more drinks, I dont' think there would even be any measureable level of alcohol in the milk anyway.


Things have changed as it used to be recommended to pump and dump before you feed again if you had recently been drinking excessively original.gif


If you can measure alcohol in your blood then you can measure it in the breast milk. It wouldn't take 6 drinks to have a positive BA reading.
Having said that I think that one or two drinks and stopping a few of hours before a feed would see most of the alcohol gone depending on the weight/height of the mum and how well she has eaten and hydrated herself with other than alcohol original.gif

#134 c.sanders

Posted 14 June 2019 - 10:33 PM

View Postwansze82, on 14 June 2019 - 10:06 PM, said:

All these numbers are confusing for breastfeeding mothers. It's easier to use glasses from The Standard Drink Company. Much easier to figure out. Wait 2hrs after consuming a standard drink is the official guidance.



Lol it's Friday so great zombie thread to stir up pp

Edited by c.sanders, 14 June 2019 - 10:34 PM.


#135 Hypnic Jerk

Posted 14 June 2019 - 11:11 PM

I spotted this one on the first page.!  I usually don’t pick up on them till much later.

#136 WaitForMe

Posted 14 June 2019 - 11:16 PM

Oh I'm nostalgic.

EB just doesn't make threads like it used to...

#137 Sincerely

Posted 15 June 2019 - 08:24 AM

Hi OP,
Your calculations assume that ethanol would be the only toxic substance in breastmilk. Ethanol is metabolised to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase.

Acetaldehyde is neurotoxic and readily crosses the blood brain & blood breast barrier.

Both alcohol dehydrogenase & aldehyde dehydrogenase activities are highly variable amongst ethnic groups due to polymorphic gene variants, with up to twenty fold variation between the fastest and slowest metabolisers.

Timing is relevant. There are individuals with extremely rapid alcohol dehydrogenase activity combined with extremely slow aldehyde dehydrogenase, whom I would expect to quickly accummulate an extremely high blood acetaldehyde peak concentration so the next breastfeed would probably be loaded with acetaldehyde.

As PPs have stated, guidelines are aimed at the lowest common denominator, but it's not just about 'common sense' but also because a specific amount of alcohol which represents a safe limit for one mother-infant set may be toxic in another mother-infant set.

(Oops - I didn't notice this was a revived thread. I'll leave my post anyway, for general information)

Edited by Sincerely, 15 June 2019 - 08:50 AM.


#138 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 15 June 2019 - 08:41 AM

View PostFeralZupee, on 19 October 2012 - 02:07 PM, said:

I agree with most of your post, except I have a genuine question, which type of cold and flu tablets are safe to take while breastfeeding?
I've had a few colds while bf and have been to a number of chemists both in Aus and Canada (hoping for different answers!), and they've all told me the same thing, that I can't take cold and flu tablets and need to treat the individual symptoms instead. Which sucks. So if there's a type out there that is ok, would be great to know for next time.

I don't think there is much, unfortunately.

Although my understanding is that the codral type medications aren't actually bad for the baby, as such, its more that they interfere with the supply.

Nurofen or Panadol help with pain, and then just your usual vitamin c, honey drinks etc.

Antihistamines which I take for allergies are oK. Loratidine is the most tested one so I stick to that.

oops zombie thread. The person asking this question's baby must be 7 by now!   It was interesting to read the intelligent reply by Sincerely in any case!

Edited by WannabeMasterchef, 15 June 2019 - 08:48 AM.


#139 littlepickle

Posted 15 June 2019 - 09:52 AM

Because your babies liver is unable to process the alcohol like an adults. Add into that an incapacitated mother who is at high risk of smothering baby when they become unconscious whilst breastfeeding.

Pretty dangerous for the baby..

#140 spr_maiden

Posted 15 June 2019 - 09:54 AM

what's with all the zombie thread revivals?

#141 JustBeige

Posted 15 June 2019 - 09:57 AM

We had a spammer.

They find the zombie threads/  we delete them and ban them. but the thread stays.

lol, someone always comes in for a chat not realising its older than most of our kids! :lol:

#142 spr_maiden

Posted 15 June 2019 - 09:59 AM

Ah....
well, EBers are all about the chats for sure lol




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