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Teacher telling children that Santa is not real?
How to respond.


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347 replies to this topic

#1 PurpleWitch

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:06 PM

So,

A teachers aide has told a handful of students in year 3 that Santa is not real.

Understandably a few very sad little 8 year olds. Not to mention a very unimpressed few mums.

Would you go down to the school and have stern words with the twit who said this? Or let it slide?



#2 TenOfSwords

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:08 PM

Absolutely I'd be having some thing to say about it!

#3 la di dah

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:08 PM

I would think it would depend why and how they said it?

They can't very well say he's real, can they? I would be angry with them if they did.

Edited by la di dah, 05 November 2012 - 08:09 PM.


#4 countrymel

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:09 PM

QUOTE (la di dah @ 05/11/2012, 09:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would think it would depend why and how they said it?



This for me as well.

#5 Carmen02

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:10 PM

I would actually go higher in my kids school deputy principal for problems definitely not right my 8yr old would be devastated

#6 casime

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:10 PM

I'd ram a christmas tree so far up her that she'd be my new tree fairy.

#7 agnodice

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:11 PM

BINGO! Although I can't remember if this was on the list... But it should be!

#8 soontobegran

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:12 PM

It is absolutely not a teacher's place to reveal that to any child under any circumstances. They need to know how to avoid and evade the question if it comes up in a discussion between young children.
I would not let it slide.

#9 WaitForIt

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:13 PM

Yep! Not the place of the teacher. Although I'm surprised at 8 the kids didn't already know or at least suspect. At that age I used to pretend I believed in Santa in fear of the gifts drying up original.gif

#10 Broxie

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:13 PM

QUOTE (casime @ 05/11/2012, 09:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'd ram a christmas tree so far up her that she'd be my new tree fairy.


That.

I agree she can't insist Santa is real, but she shouldn't say he isn't either. Just 'I don't know', or 'ask your parents' would be acceptable.

#11 agnodice

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:13 PM

ETA - maybe I'd understand all the anger of it was a prep class... But EIGHT year olds? I agree with the above comment, they could hardly say that Santa IS real to that age group, could they?

#12 Unatheowl

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:13 PM

QUOTE (la di dah @ 05/11/2012, 09:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would think it would depend why and how they said it?

They can't very well say he's real, can they? I would be angry with them if they did.


I agree with this.  I wouldn't mind.  I think my four year old doesn't really believe in Santa anyway.  Certainly if he asked me if he wasn't real I wouldn't lie to him.  I suppose I never had Santa as a child myself so I'm a bit meh about it.

#13 Therese

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:14 PM

I would go down and say something.

#14 ILBB

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:14 PM

And you respond "well Santa wont be visiting Mrs XXX house if she doesnt think he is real - will he" then make light hearted joke - end of story.  

As to my children coming to me and asking if Santa is real - I just say "what do you think"?  Hardly the end of the world - most 8 year olds at least have those niggling doubts over the veracity of the Santa Clause thing - so why the big deal??

#15 BetteBoop

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:15 PM

Was she supposed to lie?

#16 matildasmummy

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:15 PM

I would let it slide - Santa is not about the magic of Christmas for the children in this house. What it means here, is that from when the Christmas decos come out in the shops until we take our own tree down at home, I can say" Remember, Santa is watching all little girls to make sure they are being good!" and then one child suddenly forgets she was about to thump the other one.

I would love to know why it was said though

#17 ubermum

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:15 PM

QUOTE (casime @ 05/11/2012, 09:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'd ram a christmas tree so far up her that she'd be my new tree fairy.

This.
It's not a parents place to answer questions about unreal beings a child may believe in. Imagine if an atheist told a kid that their god wasn't real.

#18 A Tiny Hedgehog

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:15 PM

While it's probably not really the teacher's place to talk about Santa in any capacity, I couldn't honestly find a whole lot to cry about. It's not a public servant's job to perpetuate your lies to your child, especially not at eight years old.

#19 casime

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:16 PM

QUOTE
ETA - maybe I'd understand all the anger of it was a prep class... But EIGHT year olds? I agree with the above comment, they could hardly say that Santa IS real to that age group, could they?


They need to say "ask your parents".  If a child came to you and said "MsN, what's oral sex?" do you give them a 'blow by blow' ( wink.gif ) account of what it is, or do you tell them to speak to their parents?

#20 Lyn29

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:16 PM

QUOTE (la di dah @ 05/11/2012, 09:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
They can't very well say he's real, can they?

Whyever not? I do and have done for years.

Once, when the RE teacher told my grade that Santa wasn't real, I told them (after he left) that he was wrong. I was furious with him for saying it.

In this case, I'd just do the standard, "Well, if you don't believe in him then he doesn't come to your house. So some people think he's not real, but we know better." I would also tell the aide that it's not her place to destroy my child's beliefs with her own and please cease and desist in future.

#21 Lady Garden

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:16 PM

QUOTE (Broxie @ 05/11/2012, 09:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I agree she can't insist Santa is real, but she shouldn't say he isn't either. Just 'I don't know', or 'ask your parents' would be acceptable.

A good teacher would respond with "and what do you think?".

#22 agnodice

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:17 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 05/11/2012, 09:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It is absolutely not a teacher's place to reveal that to any child under any circumstances. They need to know how to avoid and evade the question if it comes up in a discussion between young children.
I would not let it slide.


Are we really arguing that it is not a teachers place to speak the truth? In GRADE 3?! Really? They are meant to be evasive about the nature of a mythical jolly fat man who supposedly bring commercial crap and drops in down a non existent chimney? In grade 3?!

#23 ubermum

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:17 PM

QUOTE (BetteBoop @ 05/11/2012, 09:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Was she supposed to lie?

No, a "what do you think" or "ask your parents" would be fine.

#24 Peanut212

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:17 PM

This happened to my friends at school in year two. Pretty sure it's not up to teachers to point this one out - Last time I checked it wasn't on the curriculum. I would be so angry and would bring it up with the school.

#25 WaitForIt

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:17 PM

QUOTE (la di dah @ 05/11/2012, 09:08 PM)
15053721[/url]']
I would think it would depend why and how they said it?

They can't very well say he's real, can they? I would be angry with them if they did.


What about if it's God not Santa?
I don't actually believe in God and have no idea if you do, but surely you don't think it's the teachers place to discuss this?





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