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#1 morgansacre

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:28 AM

Ok, I have edited this, because as I said I was wrong....

Edited by morgansacre, 09 November 2012 - 11:39 AM.


#2 FiveAus

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:36 AM

Ummm no, it doesn't go up. It no longer reduces to the base rate as it used to before the rules changed.

If she wants her own income, she should get a part time job.

#3 ~benita~

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:40 AM

Why on earth should the Gvt be giving teenagers money.  Surely their parents are still supporting them?

#4 emmafg

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:41 AM

QUOTE
Why on earth should the Gvt be giving teenagers money. Surely their parents are still supporting them?


Or they are getting weekend jobs?

#5 Littleone84

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:42 AM

QUOTE (FiveAus @ 09/11/2012, 11:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If she wants her own income, she should get a part time job.


I was under the impression youth allowance was an allowance paid to assist with things like school books, uniforms etc if still at school because FTB ceased or reduced once 16??? (please correct me if i am wrong), and not as a disposal income for your daughter.

#6 JillyJellyBean

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:42 AM

I got my first job at 16. I cant see why we should be encouraging young people to take handouts, but to be self sufficient.


#7 PrincessPeach

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:43 AM

Because the government is trying to encourage more people to work & not live off benefits.

I know when I went through school most parents were whinging because the kids got centrelink & they lost their payments, but they still had to pay for their food & education expenses, the kids didn't.

#8 cme

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:43 AM

I guess I'm missing the point too. Why should your daughter be given money from the government while she is studying and you are supporting her (and receiving FTB) so she can save for a car?

#9 morgansacre

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:43 AM

I'm only saying what the two ladies told me separately at Centrelink.

Ok, sorry I'm wrong, I thought the Youth Allowance was for the kids to buy school stuff, to help with TAFE while still at school, etc etc. My other children managed to save a bit to pay for a cheap first car as well.

Lynn

Edited by morgansacre, 09 November 2012 - 10:48 AM.


#10 Froger

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:44 AM

I agree with the government stance. A child doesn't need a government allowance of their own if they are living with parents, especially not for things like buying a car. Seriously, that is what a job is for.

#11 Propaganda

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:46 AM

It wasn't automatically mine when I was younger either. My mother could decide to have it placed in my bank account, but it wasn't automatically given to me, but her.

Perhaps she could apply for a job instead? If you can help get to and from if public transport is unreasonable or the hours are quite late, I'm sure she'd learn more from that than getting money from Centrelink. It will look better on a resume too, for when she becomes an adult and actually has to work.  original.gif I regret that my parents didn't support me in getting a part-time job as a teenager.

#12 Mumsyto2

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:46 AM

Not sure why you would expect the govnt to give a teenager money to buy a car  ohmy.gif

Unless things have changed drastically from when I was a teenager you get a casual mind numbing job whilst still at school and uni to get the money to do this.

I think the basic expectation is that parents would support a teenager at school in regards to roof over their head, food, basic clothing and if the teenager wanted stuff above and beyond this then they get a casual job around school hours in order to pay for any 'extras' they want.

#13 MrsLexiK

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:46 AM

QUOTE (FiveAus @ 09/11/2012, 11:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ummm no, it doesn't go up. It no longer reduces to the base rate as it used to before the rules changed.

If she wants her own income, she should get a part time job.


I was under the impression that youth allowence was paid to the "youth" as over 16 was for some reason at centrelink seen as dependant.  Meaning it was actually money meant for the parents but because 16 was dependant the parents family tax cut out for that child so the child had to be paid the money.  

I do agree if she wants money she gets a job.

ETA: I worked some minding numbing borning jobs - mostly durning the school holidays - but I also did a vet subject in yr 11 (along with my normally yr 11 studies) which ahd me at Tafe for an afternoon a week until about 5 or 6 pm so ate into actual other study time as well.  Guess what I still manged to fit in work, boyfriends, friends, driving lessons etc.

Edited by MrsLexiK, 09 November 2012 - 10:50 AM.


#14 Red Cabbage

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:47 AM

I'm glad they have. We still need to feed our kids and put a roof over their heads despite them turning 16. Plus pay for the education. Its ridiculous to start paying teens money. They soon get into their head that they don't need parents because they have money.

Mine get part time jobs to pay for the extra things they might like.

#15 Littleone84

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:48 AM

QUOTE (morgansacre @ 09/11/2012, 11:43 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm only saying what the two ladies told me separately at Centrelink.

I'd like to know how she can get a job PT with all the homework from Yr10 she gets, plus next year she will be doing a TAFE course too.

I don't understand it....they change it all the time sad.gif

Lynn


Alot of teenagers manage part time jobs as well as study and extra curricula activities, its called time management.

Goverment assistance isnt designed to help people buy cars, its to help with basic necessities.

#16 Feral Becky

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:50 AM

I thought Youth allowance was for kids at school whos parents are on VERY low incomes, or ones that have moved out of home. My 18 and 21 YO don't get it and I am fine with that. They both get Health care Cards and that's it.

Morgansacre, they will never get a job of they get Youth Allowance and live at home. It's friggin hard enough to get them to get a job anyway.
BTW, the kid who won last years highest year 12 score in WA came from a very modest background and worked about 20 hours a week in fast food.

They'll spin you the line every time about how much study they have and in some ways its true but don't fall for it all the time as half their time on the computer is spent on FB.

Congrats on your DD passing her practical license too.

#17 ~Jodama_Feral~

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:51 AM

QUOTE (morgansacre @ 09/11/2012, 11:43 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm only saying what the two ladies told me separately at Centrelink.

I'd like to know how she can get a job PT with all the homework from Yr10 she gets, plus next year she will be doing a TAFE course too.

I don't understand it....they change it all the time sad.gif

Lynn


Plenty of teenagers manage to all this with a part time job. Work nights or weekend. Or if you both feel she cant then you continue to support her.

ETA I have reread the OP and it blows me away that you encouraged her to think of youth allowance as her regular income instead of encouraging her to get a job.

Edited by kriattica, 09 November 2012 - 11:00 AM.


#18 Mumsyto2

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:52 AM

QUOTE (morgansacre @ 09/11/2012, 11:43 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ok, sorry I'm wrong, I thought the Youth Allowance was for the kids to buy school stuff, to help with TAFE while still at school, etc etc. My other children managed to save a bit to pay for a cheap first car as well.

Unless I'm mistaken you would get some additional money (if the govnt determines you need it) to pay for the school/TAFE stuff and the teenager gets a job to pay for the car they want.  Teenagers have been doing this for ever in addition to going to school and uni and fitting in lots of homework and the HSC and uni exams etc. It sounds as though your other children did not which is a little perplexing.

#19 PrincessPeach

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:52 AM

As for how, you only usually work casual - so it's one or two shifts per week & you can limit the days you work. I started off working at Big W & foudn they wanted soo much, so I swapped to working at Prouds - much better as I had the same shifts each week & had loads of holiday work. Then when I was at uni I could work a full weekday or two - to suit my timetable.

With you saying she is doing TAFE next year in what I assume it's a school based apprentiship. If so, I was under the impression they got paid for the hours they worked whilst doing these.

#20 Nataliah

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:53 AM

I think it makes total sense and is in line with other government policy.  The idea is that children are dependant on their parents until they are 25 (is this still the age?) or until they prove independance.  I am not against welfare by any means, I think it is a completely necessary part of a civilised society.  I certainly recieved it on turning 16 and would not have gotten the education I did without it.  However, it is not supposed to just be teenagers spending money.  I used mine in year 12 for room and board, clothes, shoes, school books.

#21 Feral Becky

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:54 AM

QUOTE (Mumsyto2 @ 09/11/2012, 10:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Unless I'm mistaken you would get some additional money (if the govnt determines you need it) to pay for the school/TAFE stuff and the teenager gets a job to pay for the car they want.  Teenagers have been doing this for ever in addition to going to school and uni and fitting in lots of homework and the HSC and uni exams etc. It sounds as though your other children did not which is a little perplexing.



My DD started out at TAFE before uni and yes, you get a huge chuck of the TAFE fees back.

#22 CheekyBuggers

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:56 AM

I used to get $160 fn I had to give $140 to mum for board.

I did yr 10 + tafe as well and worked casually. It's not that hard long as you time manage properly. TBH I think it would be better for her to save up for her car from her working, it teachers her how much you have to work for a dollar in the first place and will give her more pride that she's bought it herself and thus take care of it better.

#23 tothebeach

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:56 AM

I wondered how people on EB ended up with such an entitled attitude to getting government money and now I know!  I can't believe that a checklist for a 16 year old would include: 'go get money from the government to buy a car', rather than: 'go and apply to McDonalds and KFC to earn money to buy a car'

#24 FeralDancesHere

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:57 AM

QUOTE (morgansacre @ 09/11/2012, 11:28 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I know a couple of parents that would be over the moon about getting more money. But unless the parent gives the child some of it, the child gets nothing....how on earth is this fair?



Lynn mad.gif


Using this theory centrelink should classify 16 year olds independant across the board. I mean it would be unfair if parents earning 100k+ didn't give there kids enough to save for a car.

It would cost a fortune. Costs don't go up the second someone turns 16, nothing has changed from yesterday. Why would centrelink pay an allowance to someone to cover what are very optional items.

#25 Froger

Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:58 AM

Seriously, when you are living at home with your parents, with no children of your own, this is the easiest time of your life to study and have a part time job.

If a child living with parents can't manage a job and study, then they need to think about how to organise themselves better and maybe some reprioritising might be in order.




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