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The teacher put....
eyedrops in my sons eyes


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#1 SushiLover

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:31 PM

DS has had irritated looking eyes for the last week and a half which I have been treating with eyedrops and oral antihistamines.

His eyes have started to look much better in the last few days.

Anyway I went to put drops in his eyes tonight when DS said oh no, you don't need to do that tonight my teacher did it today. I asked DS to repeat what he had just said and he told me the exact same thing. Now as I don't know what sort of drop they are I can't put the eyedrops in tonight in case they interact.

I questioned DS further and he told me another little boy had eyedrops put in his eyes today too.

I ended up messaging the other mother (who also knew nothing about it) and she asked her son who stated that the teacher puts  eyedrops in there eyes when they are dry.

I just feel the teacher has no right to do this without permission from the parents. If its just a sterile water flush I can accept that - but the thing is she still needs permission.

WDYT, am I over reacting or do I have a right to approach the teacher in the morning and see what her side of the story is.

#2 Soontobegran

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:37 PM

I would imagine they are sterile saline drops and not actual prescription or over the counter antibiotic drops.
I doubt that a teacher would use anything else in a child's eye unless they are instructed to but I do know teachers who use a saline flush when eyes have been irritated.
I'd double check tomorrow, original.gif

#3 i-candi

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:37 PM

Oh gosh soooooo not right. What state?

Not allowed in NSW !!!!!!!

#4 Fr0g

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:40 PM

Sounds like an odd thing to do! Overreacting would be sending off a letter to the Minister, demanding this teacher be sacked immediately! It's definitely worth clarifying with the teacher, especially as it has prevented you from using (what I presume may be) a medicated eye drop.

AFAIK, schools are loathe to administer anything other than a cold compress or band-aid without signed permission... Eye drops are certainly things which would fall under the 'permission' category.



#5 sarahec

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:41 PM

That's so unhygienic. I'm a nurse and pts have their own eye drops to prevent cross contamination. I would be mega sh*tty!

#6 Cath42

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:42 PM

QUOTE (SushiLover @ 14/11/2012, 09:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
DS has had irritated looking eyes for the last week and a half which I have been treating with eyedrops and oral antihistamines.

His eyes have started to look much better in the last few days.

Anyway I went to put drops in his eyes tonight when DS said oh no, you don't need to do that tonight my teacher did it today. I asked DS to repeat what he had just said and he told me the exact same thing. Now as I don't know what sort of drop they are I can't put the eyedrops in tonight in case they interact.

I questioned DS further and he told me another little boy had eyedrops put in his eyes today too.

I ended up messaging the other mother (who also knew nothing about it) and she asked her son who stated that the teacher puts  eyedrops in there eyes when they are dry.

I just feel the teacher has no right to do this without permission from the parents. If its just a sterile water flush I can accept that - but the thing is she still needs permission.

WDYT, am I over reacting or do I have a right to approach the teacher in the morning and see what her side of the story is.


This seems odd to me. I have 4 kids - two in primary school, one at preschool and one at family day care. I have NEVER known a teacher or a carer to give a child any kind of medication unless an authority has been signed which specifies what the medication is, how much is to be given and when. I have NO idea why a teacher would be giving kids eye drops without a directive from parents or guardians. It sounds as though these are drops for dry or sore eyes, such as Murine which you can get without a prescription, but even so a teacher should not be putting these drops into kids' eyes without parental authority. I think you have every right to ask what's going on here.

#7 SushiLover

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:43 PM

QUOTE (i-candi @ 14/11/2012, 08:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Oh gosh soooooo not right. What state?

Not allowed in NSW !!!!!!!


QLD

QUOTE (sarahec @ 14/11/2012, 08:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That's so unhygienic. I'm a nurse and pts have their own eye drops to prevent cross contamination. I would be mega sh*tty!


Yes I am a nurse to and the cross contamination came straight to mind for me.

#8 Soontobegran

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:43 PM

I think that we need to establish whether they were eye drops or not.

Saline single use eye wash is often used as first aid if the eye looks irritated.

#9 SushiLover

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:45 PM

I have spoken to a third mother who's daughter has clarified that she has had eyedrops too. Will definitely be find out what they are tomorrow and why????

#10 Sambambino

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:46 PM

I worked in a school in VIC and parents signed a permission form for their children to be given first aid. We had individual 'one use' vials of sterile saline that we would use if necessary, usually if the eye needed flushing for grit/dirt. If we did use the drops we would inform the parent - if we couldn't reach them by phone then by a note in the diary.

#11 d├ęsir d'amour

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:46 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 14/11/2012, 08:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think that we need to establish whether they were eye drops or not.

Saline single use eye wash is often used as first aid if the eye looks irritated.



It might have been the individual use saline tubes.  If he was complaining of sore or itchy eyes, or having something in his eye, this might have been the teacher's way of dealing with it quickly and without fuss.

I would certainly be checking, though

#12 B.feral3

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:47 PM

Probably saline, who cares. You're over reacting big time.
I never could quite understand but I'm learning though EB exactly why my sister chooses to manage a fast food outlet rather than use her degree and experience and teach. She says she loved the kids, hated the parents.

#13 Expelliarmus

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:48 PM

Saline flush - ok it's first aid. I can't think of any reason why this would be a regular occurrence however, it would only be if there was an irritant and IME that wouldn't be done by the teacher in the classroom, but at the first aid room by the first aid person. Hope you can sort it out tomorrow, OP.

#14 .Jerry.

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:50 PM

We use saline to flush sand from eyes if necessary.
Just ask tomorrow to clarify.

#15 Soontobegran

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:51 PM

QUOTE (Sambambino @ 14/11/2012, 09:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I worked in a school in VIC and parents signed a permission form for their children to be given first aid. We had individual 'one use' vials of sterile saline that we would use if necessary, usually if the eye needed flushing for grit/dirt. If we did use the drops we would inform the parent - if we couldn't reach them by phone then by a note in the diary.


A decade or more ago our kid's school had these vials in the bum bag first aid kit that the teacher on yard duty wore.
No specific extra permission was needed and parents but the parents were called/notified if they didn't seem to improve the problem.

#16 howdoyoudoit

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:52 PM

Hope you sort it but I would bet money there were saline probably because so many kids suffer from hayfever at this time of year...can't imagine anything else would be used.

#17 Cath42

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:55 PM

QUOTE (Bek+3 @ 14/11/2012, 09:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Probably saline, who cares. You're over reacting big time.
I never could quite understand but I'm learning though EB exactly why my sister chooses to manage a fast food outlet rather than use her degree and experience and teach. She says she loved the kids, hated the parents.


Okay. I'm about as rational as they come. I'm the parent who says, "You probably deserved it" when one of my kids tells me they were roused on at school. But if one of your kids came home from school and said they'd been getting eye drops and so had their friends, you wouldn't want to know why? I would.

#18 mickya

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:55 PM

I bet you will discover its just a saline single use drop that has been used, and most schools dont have a nurse/first aid person anymore and its either teachers or office staff who administer any first aid.

If your child had sand/dirt in their eye you would hope the teacher would wash it out (ie use saline drops to wash it out), I see this as exactly the same, the teacher was concerned enough for your child to actually try to sooth their discomfort to which I would be thanking my teacher for careing enough to notice and do something for my child!

#19 Chelli

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:56 PM

I would imagine it would be saline as sand is often in children's eyes. Definitely ask the question though and hopefully you'll receive a satisfactory response.

#20 Fr0g

Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:58 PM

Have you searched the deep, dark recesses of your son's school bag for a medical slip from school? Wouldn't even a saline wash warrant notifying the parent? That might solve the mystery tonight.

I get the blerdy things every time my daughter squeezes out a tear and the first aid is listed as 'cold compress + sympathy' original.gif Sometimes I find them screwed up in her pockets in the wash!

#21 B.feral3

Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:04 PM

QUOTE (Cath42 @ 14/11/2012, 08:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
But if one of your kids came home from school and said they'd been getting eye drops and so had their friends, you wouldn't want to know why? I would.


You already know why. His eyes have been sore and irritated, you said so yourself. I'd either let it go (I wouldn't have given it a second thought in first place though) or thank her next time I saw her.  original.gif

#22 LynnyP

Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:09 PM

Ask if it is worrying you but I would be very surprised if it is anything but saline.  I wouldn't be concerned.  I certainly wouldn't expect to need to sign a permission form for it!

#23 FeralLIfeHacker

Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:14 PM

It probably was saline.  They keep little plastic containers of it at our kindy to use if the kids get sand or something in the eyes, they also have a "little sucker thigny" (dd's description) which they put in the corner of the eyes to suck out sand/dirt etc.
Just ask!

#24 Soontobegran

Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:16 PM

I would expect anyone, anywhere who was looking after my children to wash their eye/eyes out with saline if the child was complaining they were irritated and I had not specified previously that they were on some type of prescribed medication.
It is first aid, it will not harm them. I'd be more upset that the teacher did nothing and allowed the child to suffer the irritation and possibly make it worse by rubbing them.

I know it is not established what they were but in the couple of decades my children were at school they were never given prescription medication of any kids that they were not ordered.
I actually give the teachers a little more credit than that....I think it would be a rare finding to have a teacher do this.

If by some chance they were chlorsig or the like then I would definitely make an issue of it.

#25 SushiLover

Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:24 PM

I am hoping that it is just Saline... this I can deal with.

DS told me she uses a container that is fat....




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