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energy saving tips


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#1 JoMarch

Posted 21 November 2012 - 02:45 PM

Hi all,

With electricity bills increasing & trying to be more environmentally friendly I'm looking for some energy saving tips.  I'm trying to be conscious about turning off power points when not in use and using cold washes when washing clothes and shorter dishwasher cycles etc but after some other tips!  So hit me with your best energy saving tips biggrin.gif

#2 Leggy

Posted 21 November 2012 - 02:55 PM

Go through your house and switch any remaining globe lightbulbs to compact fluoros - they use 4-5 times less power than the old incandescents.

If you have more than one fridge or freezer, consider whether you can consolidate the contents into just one and leave the other one off except for when you really need it. We've got gran's old fridge in our garage and we only run it when we've got a party coming up and need to store an unusual amount of food for a few days.

Big flat screen TVs can suck up as much power as a fridge too so if you have one, really only turn it on for things you actually want to watch, not for just surfing looking for something to amuse yourself with. If you're going to replace a TV, consider not getting a massive one and look closely at their energy ratings.

#3 solongsuckers

Posted 21 November 2012 - 03:03 PM

If your appliances are a bit old, consider updating to newer more efficient models. We have a big tv, big freezer and huge fridge and still use far less power than some people we know that have smaller, but older models (with not much other differences in our power using habits)

QUOTE (Leggy @ 21/11/2012, 03:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Big flat screen TVs can suck up as much power as a fridge too so if you have one, really only turn it on for things you actually want to watch, not for just surfing looking for something to amuse yourself with. If you're going to replace a TV, consider not getting a massive one and look closely at their energy ratings.


This really depends on what kind of tv it is. We have an LED tv and they are quite efficient. Plasmas are worse for power consumption I think. Also, rather than just look at their energy rating when choosing appliances (the stars), I would actually be specifically looking at how many watts they use and comparing them that way.


#4 1&Twins

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:12 PM

After receiving a huge electricity bill when starting my maternity leave, apart from being more conscious of what power we were using, we bought a few power saving devices that cuts all standby power on tv, dvd, or your computer set up and the touch of a button.  The only annoying thing is when there is a power failure and we have to set up the tv device again as it's linked to a computer, sound system, dvd.

We bought Belkin ones I think they were $30 each and look like a power board.

Our latest bill was almost halved... so it will be interesting what the next bill is.

#5 ThatsNotMyName

Posted 26 November 2012 - 01:40 PM

Check around doors & windows for any gaps which may leak heated air in winter. I've just sorted our front door with some of that self adhesive foam strip stuff, it was easy to apply & only cost a couple of dollars.

Knock your heating down a couple of degrees & wear a light merino layer, I picked one up from Target for $18.

Time your showers, run them slightly cooler.

Use the clothes line over the dryer as often as possible.



#6 robot sm

Posted 26 November 2012 - 01:44 PM

Set the dishwasher or washing machine to go overnight - I think off-peak rates kick in around 10:30pm.

#7 solongsuckers

Posted 26 November 2012 - 03:45 PM

QUOTE (robotsimone @ 26/11/2012, 02:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Set the dishwasher or washing machine to go overnight - I think off-peak rates kick in around 10:30pm.


Not everybody has off peak rates though. And some people that have off peak only have it for hot water.

#8 Snot stew

Posted 22 February 2013 - 10:32 AM

It might be a minor one but I save a bit of money by washing dishes by hand.  I found with our dishwasher I was having to buy the expensive finish tablets to get clean dishes, and even then it wasn't 100%.  Also handwashing doesn't use electricity.  I have heard that handwashing uses more water but I am not convinced.

Insulation I guess is another one - see if you can upgrade your ceiling insulation.  Some houses have under floor spaces that can also be insulated.  Close windows and curtains at night if you are using heating, glass transmits heat.  I also close windows and curtains on very hot days to help keep inside cooler.

Also - when going to use an electrical appliance, ask yourself, do I really need to use this?  eg I do all my beating (when cooking) by hand.  It's all little things that add up.



#9 libbylu

Posted 22 February 2013 - 10:41 AM

QUOTE (Leggy @ 21/11/2012, 03:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Go through your house and switch any remaining globe lightbulbs to compact fluoros - they use 4-5 times less power than the old incandescents.


We did this about 5 years ago and it immediately cut our bill by more than 25%.

Also, check if you are on a peak/off peak tariff - that means your power usage at off peak times will be half price, so use the washing machine, dishwasher, vacuum cleaner at off peak times when possible.

If you use airconditioning, make sure you have insulation in your roof, and even put in some whirly birds (roof vents) to keep the roof temp down.  Then your house will stay cooler for longer without needing to turn it on.

#10 KirstenMc

Posted 23 February 2013 - 08:36 AM

Everything everyone else has said, plus

What sort of hot water system do you have? An old fashioned electric one will typically account for around 1/3 of your energy bill. So if you have one or those, switching to instant gas or solar hot water can pay for itself relatively quickly. Or, if you can't afford to do that, wrap an insulating blanket around your hot water tank.

Do you have a pool? They are also a huge energy suck, typically. See if you can run the pump for less time (just test it for less and less time until you get the point when it goes green - then you know you've gone too far!) - or get a floatron ("portable, floating solar powered swimming pool purifier, ionizer and water purifier").

Consider doing a full home power audit to figure out which appliances are using more energy, how much they use in standby etc. You can get a power metre in a kit from your library in a lot of parts of Australia. On the Canberra library catalogue it's called a 'Home energy action kit'. In SA it's the H'ome Energy Toolkit'.

#11 kpingitquiet

Posted 23 February 2013 - 08:44 AM

Chest freezers are typically more energy-efficient than upright freezers. If your chest freezer is not full, fill washed milk bottles with water and put them in the freezer. When frozen, they help maintain the temperature and keep cooling costs lower. Added bonus, you have spare drinking water in an emergency.

#12 naturalgoodness

Posted 23 February 2013 - 08:45 AM

If you are an Origin Energy customer you can call and request a home audit be completed. A person will come out and do a complete inspection of your house and energy usage. They have energy saving things that they can give you (shower heads, lightbulbs etc) and give you suggestions on how to reduce your consumption.

Otherwise, everything that everyone else said + if you have a/c system the apparent cheapest running temperature for cooling is around 25 degrees, anything cooler than that starts costing a lot more - I am sure there is an optimum for heating too.

Also shop around providers, there can be substantial savings between providers and being on market or contract rates. There are various websites that complete comparisons that are independent.

#13 shannonhill

Posted 20 May 2016 - 09:12 PM

Here's my 2 cents:

Switch everything to LEDs- TVs, bulbs, and even electric torches

Use a Flush Toilet water saving system - You can save a ton of water too this way

Use solar panels for all the outdoor lighting. This works great for us.

#14 hills mum bec

Posted 20 May 2016 - 09:15 PM

We noticed a huge difference in our power bill when we changed all our halogen down lights to LED and our Plasma TV to an LED model.




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