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Fair or not?
abiding by school policies


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#1 bakesgirls

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:49 PM

Just interested in others thoughts on this. Do you think it's fair that this boy has to cut of his rat's tail or have detention everyday?

I personally think his mother enrolled him knowing the schools policy on 'extreme' hairstyles, so it shouldn't have come as a shock that he isn't allowed to keep his rat's tail if he wishes to remain at the school.

Do you think he has the right to keep it? Do you think (as his mother has said) that if girls can have long hair, then so can boys?

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/year-...6-1226526115951

#2 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:54 PM

Rules are rules, so I think it is fair in that regard.

However, I think it's ridiculous that schools dictate to children how they should wear their hair and I do think if boys want to grow their hair they should be permitted to without consequence the same as girls. Imagine the outrage if a girl child was given detention because she had cut her hair short and the rule was girls must have long hair.

People need to get over giving a sh*t about other people's hair styles.

#3 EsmeLennox

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:54 PM

If they enrolled at the school knowing full well the policy then they should abide by it.

Generally though, I think policy re hairstyles for kids in schools is stupid and highly irrelevant to educational outcomes.

#4 akkiandmalli

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:55 PM

its a pretty clear policy. he is not following it. he suffers the consequences. no brainer from me

#5 Cat People

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:55 PM

So it's a state school?

I don't think it's fair at all.  It's a state school.  Surely that would be discrimination?

#6 FeralHez

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:55 PM

Imho a rats tail is different to a full head ponytail. A rats tail on a girl would also be "extreme" so I don't think she can play the gender  card

#7 Feral Grey Mare

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:56 PM

QUOTE (akkiandmalli @ 30/11/2012, 04:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
its a pretty clear policy. he is not following it. he suffers the consequences. no brainer from me



What she said....

#8 Jane F. Jetson

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:02 PM

If it was up to me everyone in the country would get detention until they chop those stupid things off  laugh.gif

In all honesty though, I can't see what's so wrong about being expected to adhere to a school uniform. And I don't think it's as clear-cut as demanding that girls have long hair (or boys short), it's no different to mohawks being banned when I was at high school.

#9 SeaPrincess

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:03 PM

QUOTE (Sunnycat @ 30/11/2012, 01:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Imagine the outrage if a girl child was given detention because she had cut her hair short and the rule was girls must have long hair.

Girls at my school did get sent home if their hair was what they deemed "inappropriate".  But parents knew that when they enrolled them, as did this child's mother. Not newsworthy IMO.

#10 CountryFeral

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:05 PM

This is rather embarrassing to admit but back in 1984 I had a rat tail.

I came back from the school holidays with it and it went un-noticed for a week or so as I tied a ribbon at the top (in school approved colours) and because of the extreme curliness of my hair it looked like a big fat ringlet.

It was only after visiting my big sister in hospital where she had plaited it into 5 tiny plaits and tied five tiny ribbons on each (in school approved colours) that it caught the attention of the staff.

A letter was dispatched to my home and even though Mum hadn't signed a specific 'no rat tail' clause as this boy's mother HAD done she just read it and said "Oh well, off it comes darling!" and that was it.

This child's mother is a twit.

#11 kuhla

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:08 PM

I just think it's terrible that everything in this story is about the rats tail.  What about the boys education?  Is a rats tail worth not attending school over?  Chop it off or change schools but get back to what you're there for.

#12 Poss and Soss

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:09 PM

I can not believe rats tails are back 'in'. How disgusting.

As for detention? Absolutely!

The article seems to suggest the child is in detention in class time? I suspect that might be a beat up, though. More likely he is detained at lunch time and not allowed to play with other kids.

I might change my mind about it were it proven he was being excluded from classes.

#13 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:09 PM

QUOTE (SeaPrincess @ 30/11/2012, 04:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Girls at my school did get sent home if their hair was what they deemed "inappropriate".  But parents knew that when they enrolled them, as did this child's mother. Not newsworthy IMO.


I was referring specifically to the rule in the news article that boys must wear their hair short vs a rule saying girls must wear their hair long. I'm not talking about "inappropriate" hair styles like Mohawks or rats tails.

#14 Hattie

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:11 PM

The mother is an idiot. She signed her agreement to the no rat tail policy, and now has kept her kid out of school for two weeks in protest.

Julie

#15 NunSoFeral

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:15 PM

I find it odd that she is willing to potentially damage his reputation and his education (with the two weeks off school) etc to make a point.

Poor kid.



#16 bakesgirls

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:16 PM

QUOTE (Jane Jetson @ 30/11/2012, 04:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If it was up to me everyone in the country would get detention until they chop those stupid things off  laugh.gif


Absolutely! They're hideous IMO.

I was listening to the radio in my car today and it was a hot topic of discussion. Apparently the mother said that she will keep him out of school if he's not allowed to keep the hairstyle.

I find it more concerning, if what they said about keeping him out of school is true, that his hair is more important than his education.

#17 GoneWithTheWhinge

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:19 PM

I think she is doolally. Its hair, cut it off and stop making an issue over nothing. If he wants long hair then grow the lot long, the handbook doesn't seem to ban that.

I would say that equally if it were a girl kept in detention for having purple dreadlocks. The school has a policy. They are not following what they signed up for so there are consequences. Respect and compliance are valuable lessons for people to learn, I think this family could do with taking heed of them instead of thinking the right to the child looking ridiculous trumps that.

#18 rabbit hyde

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:21 PM

The policy was in place and made available to view, the parent chose to allow her child to disobey the policy and these are the consequences.

I don't agree with the policy.  I never liked the restrictions school placed on appearances when I was in school and I don't like it now.

#19 feralangel

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:23 PM

The 80s was a great time to experiment with hairstyles. My friends and I wore a menagerie of styles in keeping with new romantics/post punk trends.  I went to a state school so it wasn't considered completely outrageous.  My teens were a great time for experimenting with fashion, especially as most of us had to tone it down once we joined the workforce (except those who found employment in the creative fields).  It''s a shame teens can't express themselves without causing a moral panic.

#20 LambChop

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:23 PM

QUOTE
Imagine the outrage if a girl child was given detention because she had cut her hair short and the rule was girls must have long hair.


If she had an extreme cut then it would be same....  boys can have long hair, they just need to wear it tied back.

School policy is clear, no rats tail, kid has one... parenting fail for not following school rules.

Ands whats with 'kid refuses to go to school for 2 weeks' comment from parents.... far out, who is the parent ?

Just ridiculous example of an 'issue', I suspect there would be a whole lot more poor examples at that school too given it feels the need to have to state those sorts of rules.

#21 Cat People

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:28 PM

But why no rat's tail?  If they can have long hair, what's the difference?

Because society has deemed the rat's tail too bogan?  

Discrimination I tells ya!  

And it's a state school.  This mum may have had no choice where to send her kid.  She would have been forced to sign the policy.

#22 Ferelsmegz

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:43 PM

QUOTE (Jane Jetson @ 30/11/2012, 02:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If it was up to me everyone in the country would get detention until they chop those stupid things off  laugh.gif


This!!

They are disgusting... get over it and send him to school.

Good luck when he wants a job.

#23 miinii

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:48 PM

Its in the childs best interest to cut it off.....IT LOOKS RIDICULOUS!!!

#24 rainycat

Posted 30 November 2012 - 06:22 PM

Rats tails are awful, they have always been awful. (sorry countrymel)

The boys mother is not doing him any favours by showing him he doesn't have to follow rules.
Cut the stupid thing off.  Mum signed off on the paperwork, she sounds as if she is arguing for the sake of arguing.

Edited for spelling.

Edited by rainycat, 30 November 2012 - 06:23 PM.


#25 CallMeFeral

Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:14 PM

I had a rats tail when I was about 10 I think... can't remember if I managed to wear it at school or not!

I think it's a stupid policy, but I also think that if it's policy, it's policy, and they should just back down.

However if she had no choice where to send her son, I do think it's unfortunate that she would have been forced to sign a stupid policy.




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