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Daycare giving 11 month old cake?


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#26 PattiODoors

Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:40 PM

As a pp said it's cake not arsenic.

DD has cake at daycare when it's a birthday celebration. DS will probably enjoy a bit of cake when he goes to daycare in January.

They rarely get sweet stuff at home so I have no issue with them having it now and again at daycare.

#27 EsmeLennox

Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:42 PM

QUOTE (loggedin @ 30/11/2012, 05:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I wouldn't be okay with it.

We start child care soon and our child has an egg allergy, I thought they only gave them the food on the menu?

Now I have something else to worry about!


No you don't, allergy situations are entirely different.

#28 6plus2

Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:47 PM

No, I would not allow my child at that age to eat cake or anything laden with a high fat content.

In daycare, can you tell them what you do not want your child to eat? I would ask if they have a policy on nutrition and ask to see it.

Alteratively, can you provide your own food for your child?



#29 EsmeLennox

Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:56 PM

There doesn't appear to have been any instruction given in this instance?

#30 Soontobegran

Posted 30 November 2012 - 08:03 PM

QUOTE (loggedin @ 30/11/2012, 08:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I wouldn't be okay with it.

We start child care soon and our child has an egg allergy, I thought they only gave them the food on the menu?

Now I have something else to worry about!



The OP's child obviously has no allergies. If they had they would not have been given cake.

Sorry but I think this is making a mountain out of a molehill . If 99% of the time your child receives a healthy well balanced diet then a small amount of cake is not going to ruin your good work.
OP I think you need to ask yourself whether your child is safe, happy and well cared for in their daycare sitting and if the answer is yes then getting angry about what effectively was probably no more than a mouthful of cake is a waste of energy.

#31 Domestic Goddess

Posted 30 November 2012 - 08:14 PM

QUOTE (meplainjanebrain @ 30/11/2012, 07:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
When I was an Uni studying nutrition we were shown a very old, well known study oin actual children that changed my thoughts about my own childrens nutrition.


Hi, is that accessible for the public? Would love to have a read of it.


Our daycare has a 10 page enrollment form. The last 4 pages are about allergies, religions, routines, habits, etc.
They're very strict and the (professional) chef does her utmost best to cook a healthy meal for every child, including those with allergies. The center is part of a large chain though, so they have a reputation to withhold.
DS doesn't have an allergy, but has a condition called "Geographic tongue". Acid foods like pineapple, raw tomato, citrus fruits, etc can really bite and sting his tongue. So they make sure he does not get any of this. He's been going for a year now and so far so good

As for cake, oh well. It happens. There's 16 kids in his room, so there will be a maximum of 16 incidents a year. Yep, I can look beyond that wink.gif
DS is always very happy to inform me that he's had cake lol. Though it's all written down on the menu as well, so parents will always know what the child has eaten and how much.



#32 Carmen02

Posted 30 November 2012 - 08:18 PM

wow a small amount of cake would be the least of my worries...OP i have 3 children 2 with intolerences/allergies. If your child has a healthy well balanced diet who cares about a small amount of cake, I would be very p*ssed off if it was for my 2 with intolerences/allergies but otherwise its not going to do anything

#33 Lainskii

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:04 PM

I'd rather my child ate a piece of cake every now and then at CC then feel excluded.
Like PP have said, it is cake, not something poisonous.



#34 Expelliarmus

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:07 PM

It's just a piece of cake ...  blink.gif

#35 *Finn*

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:10 PM

Wouldn't bother me in the slightest. It's a treat. Ok for every now and again.

#36 libbylu

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:18 PM

QUOTE (Ehill @ 30/11/2012, 06:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I wouldnt be fussed at all.  But I dont think of cake as 'junk'.  Yes, it has sugar but a nice homemade cake has all decent yummy things in it, nothing wrong with butter, eggs, decent quality cocoa and flour imo as long as it is in moderation.  Far less junkie than a muesli bar or even some rubbish bought rice cake or crackers.

I bet he LOVED it!  My DS loves a piece of my homemade banana or chocolate cake!  biggrin.gif


Cake at daycare probably IS 'junk' as you can't usually bring home made cakes.  You have to buy it and have the shop provide an ingredients list.  I made the mistake of ordering a chocolate sponge with chocolate icing and strawberries on it from the Cheesecake Factory for DSs birthday at kinder.  I thought that would be pretty simple. The commercial cake mix had a list of ingredients that went over two pages, most of which were weird additives I had never heard of, and I was so horrified that I nearly refused to pay for it, but didn't really have much choice at that stage.
I wouldn't be happy with my 11 month old consuming something like this. He'd only been fed on breastmilk and organic wholefoods at that point.  Of course he has plenty of 'junk' now, but we tried to be as careful as possible in the first two years.

#37 strawberry blondes

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:19 PM

Wouldn't bother me.

#38 bakesgirls

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:22 PM

It wouldn't bother me at all unless it was something they served every day. Once in while? Meh, wouldn't even register enough to complain.

#39 Expelliarmus

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:25 PM

QUOTE (libbylu @ 30/11/2012, 10:18 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Cake at daycare probably IS 'junk' as you can't usually bring home made cakes.

When my children went to daycare cake was baked in the kitchen using non sugar alternatives and whole grains and all that stuff. They had cake every week.

OP, if you didn't specify cake then how were they to know?

I agree that EB really is a parallel universe ...

#40 TheWanderer

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:30 PM

QUOTE (libbylu @ 30/11/2012, 10:18 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I wouldn't be happy with my 11 month old consuming something like this. He'd only been fed on breastmilk and organic wholefoods at that point.  Of course he has plenty of 'junk' now, but we tried to be as careful as possible in the first two years.


I guess this situation would never have happened to you because you would have filled out the profile form to indicate that you are a pedantic control freak and your kid would have enjoyed watching everyone else eat cake.

#41 bakesgirls

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:34 PM

QUOTE
I guess this situation would never have happened to you because you would have filled out the profile form to indicate that you are a pedantic control freak and your kid would have enjoyed watching everyone else eat cake.


This is the EB version of the begining of a school yard fight. Only difference being there's no one to shout "FIGHT", so everyone can run over to watch....

#42 fairymagic

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:34 PM

I wouldn't be concerned to be honest. Childcare centres particularly those that supply food have very tough policies on nutrition and food. An occasional piece of cake will not hurt your child. The piece he was given was probably miniscule because of his age too - not a normal slice like you might serve up to an adult or older child. I think you have to take on board the level of care he receives there and how happy he is there and put it into perspective. If you choose to have it noted that he can not have cake then that is your perogative as his parent. I for one would allow it provided that it isn't a weekly event - I think for him to be excluded from eating it when other children around him are is not very nice for him - he wouldn't understand why he couldn't have it.

In moderation it is okay. If it were made by the childcare centre it may in fact be a "healthier" cake than other store bought ones. Either way, apart from checking how often they are given cake, I would not be complaining.


#43 iheartu

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:38 PM

Geez people it's a bit of cake not crack

#44 SilverSky

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:38 PM

Yum, I want cake now.

#45 Fright bat

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:39 PM

QUOTE (libbylu @ 30/11/2012, 10:18 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I wouldn't be happy with my 11 month old consuming something like this. He'd only been fed on breastmilk and organic wholefoods at that point.  Of course he has plenty of 'junk' now, but we tried to be as careful as possible in the first two years.


To what purpose? Please explain the rationale behind organic whole foods only until age 2 and then allowing 'junk' food vs 'junk' foods earlier. And point me in the direction of any studies (real studies, not propaganda) which demonstrates that a diet if exclusive organic whole food is better in any way than additional occasional non-organic non-whole food.

I think you'll find there is no logic. I don't much like highly processed food, but who cares if it happens occasionally.

#46 TheWanderer

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:40 PM

QUOTE (bakesgirls @ 30/11/2012, 10:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is the EB version of the begining of a school yard fight. Only difference being there's no one to shout "FIGHT", so everyone can run over to watch....


Lol... Nearly spat wine on my iPad.

#47 glasnost

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:43 PM

I am pretty relaxed about what my kids eat now however had this happened to my first child I would be pretty annoyed. DS1 didn't really have any "junk" food until he was about 2 years old I guess. It wasn't so much that we were precious parents (OK maybe a bit) more that he didn't express any interest in eating cakes, chocolate etc so we didn't offer it to him. I would have been annoyed if someone else did without asking us first. 11 months is just a baby!

#48 Fright bat

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:51 PM

QUOTE (jeska~and~her~secret @ 30/11/2012, 07:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm going to disagree with most, and say that I would mind.
DD is nearly 3 and hardly ever has sugar. In the last year, I have relaxed a bit and allowed her to share whatever it is that we are having, but as we don't eat much sugar either, it's still rare that she would have cake. She doesn't drink juice or eat icecream or anything like that.
My friends who are mothers tend to also restrict sugar, so although DD goes on lots of playdates, she is not offered sugary snacks while there.
I would expect (and do expect) our child-care centre to do the same.

meplainjanebrain - that is a really interesting thought though, that moderation is the key. I don't plan on holding DD to a low-sugar diet forever, I just want her to be filled with non-sugar options for as long as I can manage it. Her birthday and that of many of her friends (through mothers' group) is coming up and I expect the parties to have lots of lollies and chocolate etc, and that is fine. Day-to-day, though (and that includes childcare) I will be trying to use fruit and honey as sweeteners.

ETA: for me if it was a sugar-free cake, I would be fine with it. Wheat-free, even better (I bake with alternatives, mostly).


Again, to what purpose? What bizarre logic leads you to conclude that honey is better than sugar? Or non-wheat grains are better than wheat (given much o humanity has subsisted on wheat for some hundreds of thousands of years).

Good on you and your friends for sticking to your guns, but your daughter will experience sugar, wheat, trans fatty acids and all sorts of things before too long. And how embarrassed will you be when she goes to her first prep birthday party and is so busy stuffing her face with sugar laden party food that she won't even go play (yes, seen it).

FYI - I'm pretty laid back about sugar, as are most of our friends. DS1 who is 3 gets chocolate at least once a week (a square, not a block), ice cream pretty regularly, juice very occasionally, and there's always a cake in the house. But DS never whines for it, might ask for chocolate on occasion at he shops but will shrug if I say no, rarely asks for a piece of cake even when it's sitting on the bench and eats every vegetable under the sun with no dramas. He's lean, strong and fit. All our friends are similar. And there is never 'junk' offered at playdates, unless the adults are having afternoon tea.

So it doesn't have to be an all or nothing approach!

#49 Mamacass2

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:55 PM

I would be annoyed. Both of my children had their first try of cake on their first birthdays, cake that I had made for them. Your child is still a baby and the centre should be respectful that a lot of parent do not feed their babies sugary foods.

#50 Mamacass2

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:58 PM

The Wanderer
QUOTE
I guess this situation would never have happened to you because you would have filled out the profile form to indicate that you are a pedantic control freak and your kid would have enjoyed watching everyone else eat cake.
I'm sorry but are you serious???Since when did ensuring your child has good healthy food at a young age or any age make a parent a control freak ohmy.gif .




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