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Do you think you represent your workplace when wearing a uniform?
Even when not at work.


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15 replies to this topic

#1 FeralDancesHere

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:01 PM

So this is going to be a judgemental post.

Tonight we went to Maccas for dinner. While we were there a man with (I assume) his two daughters was also there.

He was obviously not having the best day. A small sample of what he said to the girls was "If you don't f**king sit down and shut up, I'll f**king hit you", "I don't want to hear your f**king whiney voice again" and he threatened in similar terms to leave them behind.

One of the kids (about 7yo) also wanted to argue with me when I took DS to the toilet because boys aren't allowed in the girls. She had come out of the parents room rant.gif .

Now I accept there are people who talk to their kids like this, as horrible as it is, but what made it worse for me is the guy was wearing his work uniform and worked at a local health/disability services organisation.

I always took the attitude that when I was in work clothing I was representing the company so was on "good" behavior. Do others feel that way or do you think the representation ends when you leave the workplace?

#2 JRA

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:05 PM

Of course you do.

Or driving a work car. People who drive badly or dangerously while driving a work car are doubly idiots. DH loves to ring the company and let the company know that he will never buy/use their product etc as a person was driving dangerously in the car. Of course they take details of when it happened.

#3 75etd

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:05 PM

You definately represent your workplace when wearing a uniform, just as you are anytime you drive an identifiable vehicle.

#4 luke's mummu

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:06 PM

Oh my goodness yes you do. I know for Maccas (at least in this area) the staff aren't allowed to wear their uniform out of the store - they have to have a jacket or t-shirt over it so you don't see where they work. I think NSW police are the same.

I used to have a work shirt that was very similar to the Coles uniform. Whenever I went into Coles after work, people would ask for directions.assistance etc. Drove me nuts trying to explain that I didn't work there!

#5 Boys Rock

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:10 PM

Yes I think you do , for that reason I will only ever go to the grocery store in mine after work. Anywhere else I change.

#6 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:13 PM

Absolutely you do.

#7 Funnington

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:14 PM

QUOTE
Of course you do.


Yes, definitely x 2.

My operational unit (within higher education) have gone all corporate and introduced uniforms.  It's very clear where I work when I'm out and about - which happens often, supermarket on the way home, lunch breaks etc.  

Not that there's anything in my job description that states you must uphold the values of the organisation in the wider community, it's just common sense.  I know it's not wise to sit in a shopping mall drinking a Wild Turkey can in my uniform.  

I think the guy was feral.  It goes against my grain, i.e. swearing at children and behaving like a neanderthal while effectively representing an organisation (outside of work hours in uniform).

#8 Coffeegirl

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:27 PM

DH represents his company AT ALL TIMES.

It's in his contract that he is expected to behave in a way that is becoming of his title and company that he  works for.  This includes work functions, work trips and personal time.

If he gets caught doing anything illegal - drugs, robbery even a low range DUi, he risks a severe reprimand, or even sacking.

He holds a high title in a global corporation and wears a suit and tie as his uniform, so his actual workplace isn't even easily identifiable.





#9 MrsLexiK

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:29 PM

Yup but I had it drummed into my head at school so it had stuck. original.gif

#10 jayskette

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:37 PM

When you wear your school uniform going to and from school you are still representing the school. Same should extend to work uniforms, but I mostly ignore the tradies after work - surely not ALL tradie companies are this horrible  biggrin.gif

#11 Angelot

Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:04 PM

QUOTE (WinterDancesHere @ 18/12/2012, 10:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I always took the attitude that when I was in work clothing I was representing the company so was on "good" behavior. Do others feel that way or do you think the representation ends when you leave the workplace?


Yes, I do.

I think it has limits, though.  One employer I worked for tried to dictate that its staff couldn't smoke on their breaks, because it would tarnish their image.  I'm not a smoker and never have been, but I thought it was harsh that they effectively tried to control the legal behaviour of their staff off their premises during time for which said staff were not paid.

#12 Feral_Pooks

Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:27 PM

Yes. That's why you bring a change of clothes and drive your own car original.gif

#13 FeralProudSwahili

Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:31 PM

Of course. That man sounds like a vile fecker.

#14 JECJEC

Posted 19 December 2012 - 07:03 AM

QUOTE (MrsLexiK @ 18/12/2012, 10:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yup but I had it drummed into my head at school so it had stuck. original.gif


This.

#15 steppy

Posted 19 December 2012 - 07:13 AM

Yes of course.

#16 JustBeige

Posted 19 December 2012 - 07:16 AM

QUOTE (Coffeegirl @ 18/12/2012, 10:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
DH represents his company AT ALL TIMES.

It's in his contract that he is expected to behave in a way that is becoming of his title and company that he  works for.  This includes work functions, work trips and personal time.

If he gets caught doing anything illegal - drugs, robbery even a low range DUi, he risks a severe reprimand, or even sacking.

He holds a high title in a global corporation and wears a suit and tie as his uniform, so his actual workplace isn't even easily identifiable.

Same.  DH has a corporate shirt and the colours of the pants and shirts are set down by the company.

When I worked in the bank, it was actually a part of our contract.


OP - lets home this guy doesnt deal with clients.  Lets hope he's a cleaner or IT person* and not someone who has public based customer interaction.

*apologies to any cleaners or IT persons.







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