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Perfect Roast Potatoes? UPDATED with question post 32


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#1 Allie_D

Posted 23 December 2012 - 08:54 AM

Just as Unatheowl has difficulty getting pork crackling right, I have the same issue with roast potatoes.

I've done them every way possible!

* Boiling them and then finishing them off in the oven
* Coating them with olive oil and salt and baking them
* Cooking them in dripping
* Cooking them in duck fat

All are ok, but have been nothing magical.

So how do you make perfect roast potatoes?

Edited by Allie_D, 24 December 2012 - 01:09 PM.


#2 amabanana

Posted 23 December 2012 - 09:00 AM

I do them like this:

Boil first for about 10 mins.
Drain and let the steam off for about 15 mins. (You want to get rid of as much moisture as possible.)
Gently toss with some butter, olive oil (or duck fat), a dusting of finely milled flour and salt (and maybe some ground rosemary if eating with lamb, sage for pork, garlic etc).
Cook in the oven at 170-180 until golden, turning a couple of times during cooking.

#3 CharliMarley

Posted 23 December 2012 - 09:01 AM

I have just discovered Jamie Oliver's roast potatoes and I am going to cook them like this on Christmas Day:

Par-boil the potatoes first and this gives them a "scrappy" surface.
Place in a baking dish and sprinkle Olive Oil and any herbs you may have e.g. rosemary.
Cook in a hot oven to what you would do ordinary roast potatoes.
Take them out of the oven and squash every one of the potatoes with a masher to flatten them out and this gives them more of a crunchy surface.
Turn them over once and when cooked place on an ordinary oven proof plate and keep warm in the oven.

I found this recipe amazing and I have been cooking for 50 years. roll2.gif

#4 nicknick

Posted 23 December 2012 - 09:01 AM

Vegetable oil, salt & pepper, garlic - yum

#5 greengoddess

Posted 23 December 2012 - 10:13 AM

After you've parboiled them and let them sit to lose some of the moisture, put them in a colander and toss them around to sort of fluff up the edges, then coat in whatever oil/fat you're using. The fluffed up edges makes for a crispier roast potato.

#6 NotBitzerMaloney

Posted 23 December 2012 - 10:25 AM

Another one who says boil them, smash them, put them in a HOT oven with oil/fat/butter of your choice

#7 Azadel

Posted 23 December 2012 - 10:34 AM

Which potatoes are you using, some roast better than others. Russet makes lovely mash but doesn't roast well I find.

#8 FiveAus

Posted 23 December 2012 - 10:37 AM

I cook them in the oven, 180 C, from raw, in some oil and sprinkled with salt. Turn occasionally.
When they are cooked through, put them on a raised rack, turn the oven to 230 C, and blast them with heat for a few minutes. The outside will be lovely and crispy and the inside will be light and fluffy.

#9 *CalamityJane*

Posted 23 December 2012 - 10:45 AM

QUOTE (Azadel @ 23/12/2012, 08:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Which potatoes are you using, some roast better than others. Russet makes lovely mash but doesn't roast well I find.


Agreed.  I use Royal (the dark purple ones).  I roast them on a rack after tossing them in olive oil and salt.  Not too much oil, and make sure they are not touching each other if possible.


#10 davalli

Posted 23 December 2012 - 10:47 AM

try Hasselback Potatoes...make sure you get the seasoning all the way down into the slits...works a treat!

#11 oneplusabun

Posted 23 December 2012 - 11:31 AM

Whilst we are on the subject..... can I parboil the potatoes in advance and store them in the fridge over night? Just wondering whether they would discolour or anything?

#12 Allie_D

Posted 23 December 2012 - 11:56 AM

Sounds like a lot of EBers pre-boil them.  I didn't know about letting the steam die down before putting them in the oven.  Maybe I'll try that.

QUOTE (Azadel @ 23/12/2012, 11:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Which potatoes are you using, some roast better than others. Russet makes lovely mash but doesn't roast well I find.

I normally use brushed potatoes (not sure of the specific name!) because they seem to cook up the nicest in the middle.  But they do collapse quickly if you over cook them when boiling.

QUOTE (oneplusabun @ 23/12/2012, 12:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Whilst we are on the subject..... can I parboil the potatoes in advance and store them in the fridge over night? Just wondering whether they would discolour or anything?

Good question!

#13 tick

Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:07 PM

I don't think par-boiling would work a day in advance personally..... but if I was time-poor I'd par-boil in the microwave.  Skins on, wet the potatoes and put them in a brown paper bag then do them for a few minutes .... depends on the size and number of potatoes of course.

I used to par-boil then smash the potatoes and do in oil and salt/herbs .... they were good but I can't be bothered these days..... I now just buy baby red delight potatoes and find they're absolutely delicious just thrown in the oven with some oil and salt.  They're lovely and creamy and cook quite quickly!

#14 NotBitzerMaloney

Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:11 PM

That's only how I make "special" roast potatoes and only when I can be bothered.

My normal approach involves cutting in quaters wihout peeling them, nuking them to cook them and then shoving them in the oven at a million degrees to make them as crispy as possible in 10-15 mins!

#15 Hence

Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:13 PM

I've seen it done where the oil / duck or goose fat is heated up in the roasting pan first, then the potatoes chucked in and then cooked - kind of like a yorkshire pudding

#16 ubermum

Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:16 PM

Pop a roasting dish into the oven. Par boil peeled potatoes, drain and put back on the heat to dry them out. Shake the pot to rough up the outside of the potatoes, or rub them with a fork. Add a generous dollop of duck fat and make sure all the potatoes are very well coated. Season with salt and pepper. Tip into heated roasting dish and bake until golden.

That's my method for perfect roasted potatoes. My family said they had never had potatoes that good at last years Christmas. I think you can't beat duck or goose fat for the perfect roast spud.

Oh and it is important that you use the right type of potato. Waxy potatoes will never give you the perfect spud, no matter what you do.

Edited by ubermum, 23 December 2012 - 12:17 PM.


#17 Escapin

Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:26 PM

I would it add, after parboiling, you need to leave them for a while to really dry out. Soggy potatoes are going to take a looooong time to get crisp. Also, you do need quite a bit of salt. Salt helping the browning/crimping process. I also like to parboil mine with a peeled clove of garlic and a rosemary sprig, I think the oils from the garlic and rosemary help too.

#18 Glowworm80

Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:40 PM

I chop and boil the potatoes without peeling them. Once cooked drain them in a colander and shake them up a bit to roughen them. Dredge them with flour and seasoning. Then I 'roast' them in the electric frying pan. Not strictly roasting but they come out crunchy on the outside and fluffy in the middle. Plus I have extra space in the oven then. Sometimes I also roast the meat in the electric frying pan as well.

#19 Mousky

Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:49 PM

QUOTE (oneplusabun @ 23/12/2012, 12:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Whilst we are on the subject..... can I parboil the potatoes in advance and store them in the fridge over night? Just wondering whether they would discolour or anything?


Yes. Leave them out to cool down one layer in the roasting tray. Cover with a tea towel and place in fridge overnight. They will form a lovely crust that crisps up nicely (yhis is actually the bedt way to make chips and wedges).

#20 Feralmummacat

Posted 23 December 2012 - 01:10 PM

I peal then, cut my potatoes (I always use smallish potatoes) in half and score the tops of the potatoes. In a little bit of water I microwave the 4 to 5 potatoes ( so 8 to 10 halves) for approximately 6 minutes in a covered container.

I then place the potatoes on a airing rack, brush them over with oil and dust over with seasoning salt.

They then go into a hot oven at around 190 for 45 minutes (fan forced oven). Each oven is different so you may have to vary the temp or time

I have always managed to get crunchy on the outside with soft in the centre.

Edited by mummacat, 23 December 2012 - 01:11 PM.


#21 rileys-mum

Posted 23 December 2012 - 01:16 PM

Par boil, dry then coat in olive oil and salt.

Have a hot oven, put the baking dish on the stove top to get hot. Put a little oil in the base of the baking dish with Rosemary and garlic cloves. Add the potatoes. Turn really quickly. Turn about four times. The outside is then coated in hot oil. Put in the oven.



#22 naturalgoodness

Posted 23 December 2012 - 01:28 PM

I peel and quarter whatever roast friendly potato I have. When the roast has 1/2 hour to go, I put the potatoes in the roasting tray with it. Then when the roast is finished, I remove it for standing and whack the temperature up ensuring they are completely coated with the juices/fat/oil (whatever I used). Then I roast them until they are brown and crispy. I always get comments that they are delicious.

If I have more than what the roasting pan will hold, I make sure that I pour some of the meat juices into the second pan. In my opinion, this is what makes the difference to the end taste.

#23 Missmarymack

Posted 23 December 2012 - 02:10 PM

QUOTE (Winterdanceparty @ 23/12/2012, 10:01 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have just discovered Jamie Oliver's roast potatoes and I am going to cook them like this on Christmas Day:

Par-boil the potatoes first and this gives them a "scrappy" surface.
Place in a baking dish and sprinkle Olive Oil and any herbs you may have e.g. rosemary.
Cook in a hot oven to what you would do ordinary roast potatoes.
Take them out of the oven and squash every one of the potatoes with a masher to flatten them out and this gives them more of a crunchy surface.
Turn them over once and when cooked place on an ordinary oven proof plate and keep warm in the oven.

I found this recipe amazing and I have been cooking for 50 years. roll2.gif


Are they peeled or with skin?
And for those who use duck fat - how much do you use?

#24 sammyv

Posted 23 December 2012 - 02:28 PM

QUOTE (Winterdanceparty @ 23/12/2012, 09:01 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have just discovered Jamie Oliver's roast potatoes and I am going to cook them like this on Christmas Day:

Par-boil the potatoes first and this gives them a "scrappy" surface.
Place in a baking dish and sprinkle Olive Oil and any herbs you may have e.g. rosemary.
Cook in a hot oven to what you would do ordinary roast potatoes.
Take them out of the oven and squash every one of the potatoes with a masher to flatten them out and this gives them more of a crunchy surface.
Turn them over once and when cooked place on an ordinary oven proof plate and keep warm in the oven.

I found this recipe amazing and I have been cooking for 50 years. roll2.gif



I use Jamie Olivers roast potatoe recipe and find they are great!

#25 noi'mnot

Posted 23 December 2012 - 08:17 PM

The key really is to get the right type of potato. Not just any old potato - my favourite at the moment is King Edward. Freaking unreal. There are several good types, though.

As others said - parboil, let steam, preheat the fat in tray in the oven, season toss and roast. Perfect every time, as long as you're using the right type of potato.








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