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Sent to school earlier rather than later
almost 5 versus almost 6


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#1 newphase

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:23 PM

Has anyone, or know of anyone, who has had the option of when to send their child to school because of when they were born (so in VIC Jan-April children) and sent them earlier rather than later not because they were ready so much but because of things like child care costs not needed anymore etc...and this is a big factor in things??

And that is not saying that said child should definately have been held back (due to developmental delays, or due to social intergration issues etc), though perhaps in may have been more benefical for another yr at kinder etc.

Any one toyed with the decision and done this....not done this in the end??

Curious is all.

TIA

#2 EBeditor

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:27 PM

I am not exactly sure of what you are asking but I sent my son earlier (March birthday) as he was ready for it as well as it being easier logistically.

ETA: In his first year he has done very well academically as well as making lots of friends. He is one of the youngest in his class though, definitely.

I also thought of it as sending him 'on time' rather than early.

#3 Glr-r

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:28 PM

You don't get a choice in WA, if they were born before 1 July they go, I think under extreme circumstances you can delay by one year but it is certainly not the norm like it seems to be over east, I've got a April baby (so 2 months before the cut off) and a February baby (4 months before cut off) and both have been fine.

#4 Chocolate Addict

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:29 PM

I know two boys from two families that started school at an earlier age than their classmates.

They are about to start grade 2 and one turned 7 last week, the other turns 7 in February. All their classmates are about to start turning 8.

Both boys are a bit behind the classmates. The one just turned 7yo is struggling big time with no social skills and is well behind the others.

I think it depends on the individual child but if my child was that young I would not have sent him to school early. My son was born the end of May so he is one of the older kids in his class. original.gif

#5 Bbtimes2

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:32 PM

I do know someone that did this about 5 years ago. Her son was born in March and would have benefitted from another year but she just didn't want to pay for another year of child care.
So,what she did was send him to the local public primary school for a year and then the next year moved him to the school that her older children went to where he did Prep again. I felt really sad for her son because he spent a year learning and making friends but all along his mum had the intention of using that year as "cheap childcare".
My younger son is a late Feb baby and could go to school next year but for various reasons won't be going. I am doing what is best for him, not what is best for me.

#6 newphase

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:34 PM

Well, in VIC in seems the norm to send children to school the yr they turn 6 (not 5) if they are born Jan-April (the cut off being 30th April), especially for boys, and especially if born March or April. Not exclusively so, but more often than not!

So has anyone sent their child to school more out of necessaity due to childcare costs, or work logistics or any other reason apart from your thought they were 100% just ready to go no questions asked. Or in questioning readiness, did any of these factors influence the final decision to send to school earlier, starting at 5, rather than wait another yr...as is the norm to do it seems in my experience!

#7 No girls here

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:36 PM

I sent a child to school young (May birthday, NSW) but childcare costs did not come into the decision.  I know many others who have sent children young, and am not aware of any where cost was a deciding factor.

#8 EBeditor

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:39 PM

I would have only kept my son back if 4-5 days pre-school had been available, as he could not have done another year of free play at daycare without being seriously frustrated and bored out of his mind. It wasn't, so that did influence our decision a bit, but his teachers all thought he was ready for school.

I don't know anyone who has made the decision just on financial grounds.

#9 tait

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:44 PM

My youngest son started full time scool this year. His birthday is in June and met the cut off date by a week. Most of his friends were/are turning 6 while he is 5.

I was a SAHM before he started FT school, so freeing up child care money wasn't an issue. We decided he was ready for school. He has had a good year, lots of friends and learning wise, he is middle of the class.

I think, like a PP, that it depends on the child.

#10 bmieke

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:48 PM

I do know of a couple of boys in my son's Kindy class (first year of school in NSW) last year that were sent to school to save on daycare. My son and those 2 boys were June birthdays (NSW the cutoff is end July), however my son was a full year older than the other 2. We held DS back due to his ability to throw some massive tantrums for me.... of course once he was at school it was never an issue  wacko.gif

Anyway, my son slotted right in and has taken off at school. The other 2 boys have struggled. For the first term or so, they were falling asleep in class after lunch. Now this year (year 1) one has had to go into reading recovery and the other desperately needs it, but can't get a spot.

Obviously, this is just my limited experience with boys close to the cut off.

#11 Ice Queen

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:50 PM

My BF's DD is an April baby and she sent her to school at 4 (so was turning 5 that April).  She was the youngest in her class.  It turns out that she has a slight learning disability (nothing major and overcome now with diagnosis and some additional resources) but it was too early to pick up at that stage and noone really picked that she was not even close to being ready for school.  She struggled, really struggled for that 1st year and then probably another year.  My BF regrets the decision to start her early so much.  

Their decision had nothing to do with childcare, just that is what the school encouraged I think and what they thought was best at the time.

#12 Lady Garden

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:50 PM

My SIL sent her Feb-born daughter to school at 4 turning 5, she is doing well.

I was an April baby and also started at 4. I did well and remember all the teachers loving me as I was the youngest!

I know of two mothers who held their Feb babies back for an extra year, and both of them have been complaining about how advanced their children are and how the school doesn't extend them enough. It annoys me because their children should be in the year ahead, and it is not the fault of the school or the teacher that the parent has made this decision.

There was a March-born boy in my daughter's class this year whose mother had decided to send him at 4 rather than do the 3yo-kinder-twice trick and watching him develop over the year as been really lovely, he really blossomed in the school environment and I think that had his mother kept him home for another year a lot of his behavioural issues (just related to age, not developmental issues) would have become quite entrenched. Plus she is delighted that her son won't be driving or legally drinking in Year 12.

#13 mumandboys

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:54 PM

DS3 is March born, so he can go to school in 2013 (4 turning 5), or the following year (5 turning 6).

I tossed and turned about whether or not to send him, I think I always knew he wasn't ready, but wanted him to be (for financial and logistical reasons).

I've had 2 in daycare for the past 6 years, and it does get tedious working your first 2-3 days in the week for nothing!  I was also looking forward to scaling down the school run to 2 destinations instead of 3.  Small things, yes, but they do wear on you over time.

I enrolled him, bought the uniforms, started psyching him up... then, at orientation, it became very obvious he's not ready (well, obvious to others - I think it was always obvious to me).

In retrospect, I wish I had never started the ball rolling... then again, it could have been worse - I could have continued to ignore my instincts and started him, and then would have had to pull him out.

Like everyone else on here, I want what's best for my kids.  But I will absolutely admit that financial and logistical considerations were a huge factor in my decision, and initially, almost blinded me to the right decision.



#14 mum850

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:58 PM

Of course kids with developmental delays should be held back if it would help them, but not kids without issues. FYOS is MEANT to be for young kids!
I wonder if often kids are held back for the reason of the parent not being ready, rather than the child?
My first two kids went at 5 1/2 due to when their birthdays were, but I would have sent them at 4 1/2 had  I been allowed. They found FYOS quite a frustrating experience.
My third child is going at 4 1/2.

TBH the driving  of the younger kids to different places was more of a problem than the cost. I am not sorry about saving a whole year of full time child care fees though.... really looking forward to the 2 younger kids being at the same school.

Kids born jan to april in Vic who go at 4 turning 5 are not being sent early, they are being sent on time.

Friends of my daughter's were both held back (no diagnosis, they just wanted their kids to be older and more advanced) and again their parents are complaining that they are not being extended enough, and both girls  are doing a bit of bullying. Yep, well they should be in the year above!!!



#15 mez70

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:59 PM

I think in Vic there always has been a huge difference as well in the dif between Kinder and School. I know of kids who were more than ready for more than 12 hrs a week of kinder but the full time program of school proved to much. I have seen kids start at 4 who you would never guess were the youngest in the class just as I have seen others who even at the end of the year were still very much younger than there peers socially, emotionally and other ways.

TBH Childcare costs SHOULD not be the reason for sending a child before they are ready and you will find that you may still need to access before and after school programs as well which also cost as well.

It really is a case of if a child is ready. In Vic some schools are running Pre Prep programs which are basically a program where the child "repeats prep" It is designed for kids who are school age, need more than what they get from kinder but not quiet ready for big school and essentially the kids get exposed to all the same work etc as the preps and if they surpase the expectation they jump into grade 1 or they then have the second prep year.

It is UNFAIR on both the Child and teacher to send a child to school based on Childcare costs alone regardless of if they are an April 29 baby or a May 01 (the prev year) baby...... To start when they are not ready does have impacts and they can be long term.... I regret sending my Sept DD when I did and if I had my time again I would have held her back in kinder as holding her back in grade 1 was the hardest thing (It was also the best decision we made) it took her ages to re group, make new connections and disconnect from her prev grade

#16 TeaTimeTreat

Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:06 PM

We could have sent DS to school this year starting at 4yrs 8m in Feb but we decided to apply for an extra year of kindy (through C&K/Qld Gov) and then confirm with the school he could start prep a year later (prep is non compulsory here in QLD), the reason we decided to do this was that back when he turned 4 he still had some developmental delays and his lung function was not great through winter (he is a former 29 weeker), we decided he needed the extra year to catch up and get stronger physically which his paediatrician and kindy teachers agreed with.

It has not been a cheap year but it has been worth it.

I do have a friend who decided to send her developmentally normal, big 4 year old to state school for FYOS for free and then repeat the year at the private school she will be staying at so that she could make sure her DD was not the youngest in her year at private school without having to pay for an extra year of childcare, not something I would do but quite a few do.

#17 JRA

Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:38 PM

QUOTE (Chocolate Addict @ 29/12/2012, 08:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I know two boys from two families that started school at an earlier age than their classmates.

They are about to start grade 2 and one turned 7 last week, the other turns 7 in February. All their classmates are about to start turning 8.

Both boys are a bit behind the classmates. The one just turned 7yo is struggling big time with no social skills and is well behind the others.

I think it depends on the individual child but if my child was that young I would not have sent him to school early. My son was born the end of May so he is one of the older kids in his class. original.gif

Are you in Vic? Is your friend in Vic
This is when I get p*ssed off. The child started school  5 mths before cut off, assuming he is in Vic. ie turned 5 in Dec, when cut off is 5 in April. Why is that classed as starting "early".

If your child is May birthday and oldest in his class, that suggests there are lots of kids who have started with Dec-Apr birthdays turning 5, not turning 6.

#18 EBeditor

Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:43 PM

The fact is, somebody has to be the youngest!

#19 B-B-M

Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:53 PM

DD is an April baby and was 4 when she started (NSW).

She was ready, she has taken to school like a duck to water. She is top of her class academically and is quite popular with her peers.

Keeping her back didn't really cross my mind as i knew she was ready. She would have been so bored if she wasn't sent to school this year.

#20 Bbtimes2

Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:53 PM

My oldest DS is a May baby (Vic). When he started school I was sure he would be the oldest in the class as he missed the April cut off by 4 days. He is actually around the middle age wise.
I guess there are a lot of reasons behind why people send their kids to school when they do. I don't think there are any hard and fast rules as to when to send them and really I'm sure all parents think the decision they are making is the right one.
No one wants to see their child struggle, whether it be socially or academically.



#21 Fossy

Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:58 PM

Dd is march 25 birthday, we are in Vic so the official cut off is April 30, but her school has a blanket policy that each child must be 5 on the first day of school, so the decision is out of our hands. Kind of happy about that to be honest!

I can see why people would send their child to school rather than daycare, our daycare fees next year for 2 kids part time will be $36k, crazy!

#22 Elemenopee

Posted 29 December 2012 - 10:00 PM

In SA here, which currently does rolling intakes, going to one intake per year in 2014.
My girls are both March babies, started in tern 2, have done 3 terms of reception and went into yr 1 the following year. Both do very well.
My boys, also March babies, will start at 4yrs 10 months, and do 4 terms of reception. I have no qualms about this at all, I don't consider it starting early but starting on time. The classroom they go into will be largely play-based, with lots of collaboration with the local preschool. If they are overly tired, they will have a day home with me, as my girls were able to do (but rarely did - they hated having to stay home).

#23 *maddierose*

Posted 29 December 2012 - 10:02 PM

I am a preschool educator and see way to many parents send children who are not ready just so they can save on childcare.

Many who were sent this year are repeating kindergarten next year (FYOS in nsw).

I even had parents tell me that they knew their child was not ready but didn't want to pay childcare so would repeat next year. This child went to school with my ds and was not ready emotionally, socially or academically and took up a lot of the teachers time.

Edited by belnryan, 29 December 2012 - 10:04 PM.


#24 alison7304

Posted 29 December 2012 - 10:09 PM

In our Tassie public school Kinder is for the year they turn 5. which means that in my sons class there were some children who turned 5 in January, along with those who didn't turn 5 until December! I like the sound of your June/July cutoffs, it sounds much fairer to me. I am trying to decide whether to buck the system with Shayley (November 14), then Kiraley (Dec 29). The boys are both mid year so haven't had any trouble.

    I think some children are still not coping a few years later, each child is so different. And each classroom/teacher/other students situation can affect how they are coping. I think half a year can make a big difference in their development when our little ones are so young.

#25 -Moxie-

Posted 29 December 2012 - 10:21 PM

Honestly, Ive never thought about it. I send themm the year they are suppose to go. For DD1 that was year she turned 6 (Sept birthday) and DD2 the year she turns 5 (March birthday.) My next 2 are March and June birthdays and they will go the year they turn 5.

DD1 has twin girls with June birthdays in her class, they (IMO) are not ready for year 1 academically or socially but may do better if the were in different classes.

DD2 has twin boys with June birthdays in her kindy class and they have blossomed and grown to be on par with the average.

We are in WA and I dont think you get a choice. You start when they say you can.




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