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About disabled toilets...


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#1 podg

Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:50 PM

I am just finishing my first period since #4. I also have a copper IUD, and there was a heavy day there when I was overflowing/changing protection every half hour. I use a menstrual cup so get my hands bloody during the change.

I was at a (beach)toilet where the mens and womens cubicles are both across from the basins, which are shared. Because of the bloodiness situation I used the disabled cubicle so I could wash my hands without displaying them to anyone.

When I walked out a party of people with visible disabilities and their carers were going by and I was consumed with guilt.

Did I do the wrong thing, EB?

#2 missjoads1234

Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:55 PM

Not really sure why you're asking. Do you want criticism or praise or?

I dont see why it matters what EB thinks.

FTR - if its an emergency as it clearly was and you were quick - there is nothing wrong with what you did.

#3 PixieVee

Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:57 PM

I think what you did under the circumstances is fine.

#4 Stellajoy

Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:57 PM

Pretty sure that having your period isn't a disability.



#5 Halcyon~

Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:58 PM

Was there a sign saying you MUST be disabled to use these loo? And is so did they have a criteria on what they class as disabled?

#6 Roy G Biv

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:00 PM

I think it's ok too.

#7 Pompol

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:00 PM

Ive been in exactly the same situation and done the same thing. In fact i did it at seaworld last year during a badly timed overly heavy period and a carer had words with me about it. I apologised but didn't explain, I mean, really - the guy was right, his disabled client/friend/lover/relative's needs are why the loo is there, even if i had explained, my menstrual disfunction is pretty irrelevant to him. There is also a baby change room in the shopping centre in this town where the "parent's" toilet is a lot smaller than a regular cubicle (!!!!) and I've used the disabled toilet across the hall instead, so I don't have to chose between locking my kids on the other side of the cubicle and shutting the door while I go!'

Look, the toilets are there for the disabled. I suspect morally we are in the wrong on this but in practice I'm not exactly sure what else we can do?

#8 Kitty Fantastico

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:00 PM

Does it matter now? What's done is done. If you feel guilty, try not to do it again. If you felt it was an "emergency" then you had to do what you had to do. I'd forget about it.

eta: I've never used a menstural cup, but couldn't you have wiped your hands clean with toilet paper before washing them?

Edited by Kitty Fantastico, 09 January 2013 - 07:03 PM.


#9 Cat People

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:01 PM

QUOTE (podg @ 09/01/2013, 06:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Did I do the wrong thing, EB?


No.

#10 ubermum

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:02 PM

I am pretty sure some people on here will lynch you for that. As far as those waiting are concerned, they don't know if genuinely needed that toilet or not. For all they know, you could have been changing your colostomy bag. As far as I'm concerned, you needed it, you used it. Why feel guilty?

#11 Expelliarmus

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:02 PM

*looks for popcorn icon*

#12 la di dah

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:02 PM

QUOTE (Halcyon~ @ 09/01/2013, 07:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Was there a sign saying you MUST be disabled to use these loo?


Really?  unsure.gif Would it say "don't be a scumbucket"?

Anyway, OP, I can understand your embarrassment but I like to think I would have used a regular toilet and then just wiped my hands with toilet tissue so any blood was less obvious before washing them in the sink. Admittedly, I have only ever used pads so I have no idea what happens when you change a cup - please forgive me for picturing you looking like Sissy Spacek in Carrie.

#13 AnnBB

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:03 PM

I think it is fine that you used them. Don't worry about it.

#14 76 feral others

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:04 PM

Off topic, but to the poster who said that the carer had words with you, that surprises me. You hear a lot on here about invisible disabilities and the carer does not know your situation at all.

#15 76 feral others

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:06 PM

QUOTE (la di dah @ 09/01/2013, 08:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Really?  unsure.gif Would it say "don't be a scumbucket"?

Anyway, OP, I can understand your embarrassment but I like to think I would have used a regular toilet and then just wiped my hands with toilet tissue so any blood was less obvious before washing them in the sink. Admittedly, I have only ever used pads so I have no idea what happens when you change a cup - please forgive me for picturing you looking like Sissy Spacek in Carrie.


I use a cup and you can get a bit of blood on your fingers, but it isn't as though you couldn't wipe and wash when outside as you said.

#16 Rach_V

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:11 PM

Off topic, but WHAT is a menstrual cup??????

#17 Feral Nicety

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:11 PM

Were the people with disabilities waiting to use the toilets?  

I'm really hoping a scheme I read about recently does begin to roll out--if you have a disability and a need for the toilets, you get a universal key to the toilets which can be used Australia-wide.  That would be win-win as we never again would have a thread about people justifying using a disability toilet and people who need the toilets will have access.

#18 76 feral others

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:14 PM

QUOTE (Rach_V @ 09/01/2013, 08:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Off topic, but WHAT is a menstrual cup??????


The best thing ever. I have used mine for about  a year and a half and they sound gross but they are truly awesome. I think they are less gross than tampons and I forget I have my period with it and my periods aren't painful anymore.
This is the one I use and it's probably the most well known http://divacup.com/products/the-divacup/

#19 BetteBoop

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:14 PM

QUOTE (Balzac @ 09/01/2013, 07:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Were the people with disabilities waiting to use the toilets?  

I'm really hoping a scheme I read about recently does begin to roll out--if you have a disability and a need for the toilets, you get a universal key to the toilets which can be used Australia-wide.  That would be win-win as we never again would have a thread about people justifying using a disability toilet and people who need the toilets will have access.


Oh but then what on earth will people do? If they didn't have accessible toilets, the world would end.

#20 podg

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:16 PM

I ask because people here hold strong views on this, and I want to know for next time in case I was in the moral wrong.

The loo is just a disabled one, you know the drill, bars to hold, wide entry, basin in the cubicle, room to manoeuvre. Labeled with a blue wheelchair and indication it is unisex. Pretty obviously not for just anyone who needs a standard toilet visit. The change table is not in there.

I don't think a period is a disability either, but I think walking out of a cubicle into a public handwashing area with a hand covered in blood is pretty poor form if I can avoid it.

#21 Angelot

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:18 PM

How would that scheme work in all the places where the baby change facilities are in the disabled toilets (which seems to be most of them)?  Or would they not be fitted for the universal key thingy?

#22 Feral Nicety

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:23 PM

Ange those are not dedicated disability toilets so, no, they would not be fitted with the lock.

OP, honestly?  Do you need to keep asking?  I think you will find that people who don't need the toilets will generally support you and people who need the toilets or are carers are just over here in the corner with our eyes spinning while we rock and chant.

What would you have done if the disability toilet was not available for your menstrual emergency?

#23 sparassidae

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:26 PM

Just wipe your hands with toilet paper before going out of the cubicle- that's what I do. I wouldn't think to use the accessible toilet for that reason.

#24 1975ladybug

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:33 PM


The mlk scheme I think it is, is the universal key is not widely supported, and further it discriminates those who do not have access to the key or left it at home. For instance a person with a disability traveling from overseas would be discriminated as they would not have a key or have to make additional arrangements

Further accessible facilites facilities are not for the use of a person with a disability  only, that would be discriminatory towards able body persons where the only is installed is one that is accessible.

#25 podg

Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:33 PM

Thanks for responses. I was going to the toilet in trepidation each time, not sure just how messy it would be as it was still on the increase.

I wanted to know from EB, as a sample of responsible considerate society, whether I should regard it as justifiable or never do it again.

I think I know now. Thanks.










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