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When did your daughter start changing?


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#1 Fillama

Posted 11 January 2013 - 12:30 PM

My daughter is 8 1/2 turning 9 half way through the year. I was just wondering what age other parents started noticing subtle changes in their kids? This is what I've noticed with my daughter, a few months ago she started getting pimples. Mainly in her t-section like on her nose and between her eyebrows, they are not just little spots either some got pretty sore and nasty. Is it too early to introduce a skin care routine do you think? Also in her attitude its not like 'little girl bratty'anymore its more narky and teenage like if that makes sense. Suddenly everything is about her, everything we do is to make her life hard etc. And lastly she is more emotional, she seems so much more sensitive and cries so easily. Well either that or screams! I am starting to slowly get a taste of what it's going to be like parenting a teenager but surely this is coming along way too early! What do you think?

#2 CharliMarley

Posted 11 January 2013 - 12:34 PM

It does seem too early and I am wondering if there could be a hormone imbalance, so a visit to your GP is what I would do.

#3 Ireckon

Posted 11 January 2013 - 12:37 PM

DD just turned 9 . She has needed deodorant for a good year or so. She has been a bit emotional, but is mostly a steady child. When she does have a meltdown, I understand why, but don't accept the behaviour - as in, I get how her brain is processing things. The boys on the other hand, I have no idea what the hell goes on in their thought processes.
DD is starting to get little breast buds, and we have just bought a natural face wash and moisturiser to start a face cleaning routine, cos she is getting more pimples, mostly on the cheeks. She is very good at communicating what she is feeling -as in, can identify if she is upset due to embarrassment, or if she is nearly cos she is tired.

It's a work in progress though. I am doing my best to guide her emotional growth, cos I was given no help and stayed quite immature for a very long time.

Edited by Ireckon, 11 January 2013 - 12:38 PM.


#4 Fillama

Posted 11 January 2013 - 12:41 PM

QUOTE (Ireckon @ 11/01/2013, 10:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
DD just turned 9 . She has needed deodorant for a good year or so. She has been a bit emotional, but is mostly a steady child. When she does have a meltdown, I understand why, but don't accept the behaviour - as in, I get how her brain is processing things. The boys on the other hand, I have no idea what the hell goes on in their thought processes.
DD is starting to get little breast buds, and we have just bought a natural face wash and moisturiser to start a face cleaning routine, cos she is getting more pimples, mostly on the cheeks. She is very good at communicating what she is feeling -as in, can identify if she is upset due to embarrassment, or if she is nearly cos she is tired.

It's a work in progress though. I am doing my best to guide her emotional growth, cos I was given no help and stayed quite immature for a very long time.

Good to know I'm not alone!

#5 JustBeige

Posted 11 January 2013 - 12:51 PM

QUOTE (Jetay @ 11/01/2013, 01:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My daughter is 8 1/2 turning 9 half way through the year. I was just wondering what age other parents started noticing subtle changes in their kids? This is what I've noticed with my daughter, a few months ago she started getting pimples. Mainly in her t-section like on her nose and between her eyebrows, they are not just little spots either some got pretty sore and nasty. Is it too early to introduce a skin care routine do you think? Also in her attitude its not like 'little girl bratty'anymore its more narky and teenage like if that makes sense. Suddenly everything is about her, everything we do is to make her life hard etc. And lastly she is more emotional, she seems so much more sensitive and cries so easily. Well either that or screams! I am starting to slowly get a taste of what it's going to be like parenting a teenager but surely this is coming along way too early! What do you think?

No not too young at all in my experience.   We have found (and seen in friends DDs) that the emotional swings associated with puberty can start at this age.  

I didnt start a skin care routine as such, but got her some skin wash/cleanser to use in the shower of a night.  We also started having lots and lots of conversations about mood swings and puberty and what her body is going through. We also told her that if it was easier for her she was allowed to cry her frustrations out. - she did go through about 12mths of crying at the drop of a hat, but it helped her cope.

We also found that she relished the one on one time with mum, so we started our days out at that age too.

We really did come down hard on her from the start about the way she was talking to us.  She is a lot better now (nearly 13) but still definitely has moments.

It does get slightly better once their period starts regularly.

#6 Hollybaby

Posted 12 January 2013 - 09:53 PM

Hi,
My eldest DD is on the very early side of 'normal'. Which is apperently anywhere from 8 upwards. I was initially concerned that she was developing too early so with a GP referal we went to a specialist. I was told that from the onset of puberty there'll be changes, ie; breast development, pubic hair growth, pimples, body odour, it will be about 2 years after this that she will get her period.
We started a face washing/skincare routine to coincide with showertime. DD likes that she gets her own facewash etc to use.

One thing that we found fantastically helpful was the book 'Girls Only' - All about periods and growing up stuff. (ISBN 0340878282). I wanted my daughter to be prepared wnd not frightened by the changes  happening with her. We read the book together. Never have I known her to be as eager to read as when we read this book. The book itself details the changes that will happen. It is written in a very matter-of-fact way with no fuss answers to problems and situations that may arise.

Good luck with the journey. I hope it's a smooth one :-)

#7 Chchgirl

Posted 12 January 2013 - 09:57 PM

My oldest girl is nearly 15 and by 11.5 years she was fully developed with boobs etc, and got her period..(poor thing!)..

My second daughter is now this age and is exactly as I was at that age-a child! She is tall, thin, has no boobs and hasn't really started changing as yet..no sign of period, I really hope she is a late bloomer like I was! (I got my period at 15!)

#8 Overtherainbow

Posted 21 January 2013 - 09:03 PM

I have a 9 and 11 year old.  I've bought some face cleaner and moisturiser and placed it on the bench near the sink and some more cleanser in shower.  I've shown them how to use it and leave it to them to use or not to use.




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