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What's Taroona Primary School like?


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#1 Zastler

Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:56 AM

Hi, we would like to move to Taroona and have a few last minute wobbles because we don't know if the school is what we're after (v tempted by the Cottage School for instance, but would rather live close to water & hills).  I'd love to hear from anyone with kids there what Taroona PS is like (year one)!

things that I like in schooling are: play-based approach, not too much emphasis on achievement (letting kids achieve at their own pace), concern for group dynamics and how kids fit in with others, building relationships, self directed learning...  ok,ok the Cottage School is all that, but is this also in some way part of public schooling?

Thanks for any insights!! biggrin.gif

#2 tassiemumto4boys

Posted 31 January 2013 - 06:33 PM

QUOTE
things that I like in schooling are: play-based approach, not too much emphasis on achievement (letting kids achieve at their own pace), concern for group dynamics and how kids fit in with others, building relationships, self directed learning... ok,ok the Cottage School is all that, but is this also in some way part of public schooling?


Both of my kids attend Taroona Primary School. It's a really lovely school community. Great teachers, good principal, and generally a well regarded school in Southern Tasmania.

As for what you're looking for, all I can really say is that if you're looking for those qualities in a school - you're probably best looking at a Cottage School or Steiner or something like that. Taroona is like all public schools - it's not a play based approach, there is some emphasis on achievement but it is more about personal achievement (doing your best, playing fair, respect for others and the environment, that kind of thing), and little, if any, self directed learning. The school does encourage building relationships, particularly with the community at large, the environment, and within the school itself (it has a buddy system where grade 3 student are 'buddied' with Kinders, and each year after that - grade 4's with preps, grade 5's with grade 1's, grade 6's with grade 2's).

If you're like to know more, feel free to respond and I can do my best to answer any questions you have ( of course, this will only be my opinion/experience of the school) :-)

Hope this helps you make up your mind. We've been very happy with the school and have no plans to change the kids out of there any time soon.



#3 HRH Countrymel

Posted 31 January 2013 - 06:37 PM

And you can grow up to be a princess!


#4 Goblin Face

Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:02 PM

I work in Taroona.  It is such a lovely community.  Very close-knit and friendly.  Beautiful people too.  We'd like to move here too one day.

My girls go to Fahan School (well, my eldest so far) which is 2 mins up the road from Taroona.  They adopt the Regio-Emilia philosophy of play based learning in the Infant grades.  It is a private school though, and expensive by Tassie standards.  We love it there though, my eldest is fitting in so well.  It's a beautiful school and has exceeded our already high expectations in terms of community, quality teaching, pastoral care, academics and extra curricular.  We are so pleased we chose this school.

Taroona primary has a good reputation as far as I am aware.  It is on a very big grounds though, along with the Taroona high school which is very big in terms of enrollments.  Most of the public primary schools in the Sandy Bay area are excellent; Princes St; Waimea; Albuera; Sandy Bay Infant.

I know very little about the cottage school.  I'd be mindful of travel time from Taroona to Bellerive in peak hour.  It is certainly not something I'd be willing to do crossing the bridge every morning and afternoon, given it takes me 20 mins just to get to town from Taroona.  I'm a timid driver though, and the peak hour lane alterations on the bridge scare the hell out of me!  If you like the cottage school, you should consider living on the eastern shore maybe.

Good luck with your decision, and feel free to PM me if you need more details.

#5 tassiemumto4boys

Posted 08 February 2013 - 01:03 PM

Taroona Primary School's student population is approximately 340. The High School is around 650 or so, I believe. The grounds are not as extensive as you may think. I would deem it to be a middle sized school - not a large school - as this was one of the reasons we chose it. Kingston Primary has over 600 children attending - THAT is a big school.

#6 liveworkplay

Posted 09 February 2013 - 10:31 AM

QUOTE
I'd be mindful of travel time from Taroona to Bellerive in peak hour. It is certainly not something I'd be willing to do crossing the bridge every morning and afternoon, given it takes me 20 mins just to get to town from Taroona.


You are going against the traffic so once through the city, you would have a clear run. I can make it from Bellerive to the Huntingfield in peak hour with the traffic in 25 minutes.

The cottage school has a wonderful reputation and outcomes. It currently has 65 students from K-6.

Edited by liveworkplay, 09 February 2013 - 10:32 AM.


#7 Spa Gonk

Posted 09 February 2013 - 11:37 AM

According to the myschool website, Kingston Primary has 411 students.  So not that much bigger than Taroona.

#8 CocobeanLillylove

Posted 09 February 2013 - 11:45 AM

QUOTE (countrymel @ 31/01/2013, 07:37 PM)
15288995[/url]']
And you can grow up to be a princess!


Hehe

#9 tassiemumto4boys

Posted 11 February 2013 - 08:16 PM

Spotted Giraffe: its a difference of 70 students. That is at least 4 classes. Taroona would never be able to accommodate that many more students without compromising on playground space or the environment/surrounds. But thanks for filling me in, I thought it was more than that. When I spoke to the Principal some 3 -4 years ago, he certainly gave me the indication they plan on increasing their students numbers in time.

#10 Fire_fly

Posted 11 February 2013 - 08:22 PM

I don't have any productive advice but I wish I lived in Hobart so that my daughter could attend the Cottage School. It's what I compare all other schools with.

#11 Zastler

Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:03 AM

Thanks a lot for your insights!  We are actually thinking of sending our little son to Fahan eary years as there is currently no space in Taroona, and I love the school's approach too.  
And Taroona does sound like a lovely school as far as public schools are concerned.  I was relieved to hear about the buddy system - my main concern is that our daughter can fit in and build relationships with kids and teachers, especially as she is joining the existing group in July.  With a kind of play-based approach this is easier, but ultimately it'll depend on the support of the teacher I think.  she is a normal kid, a little shy to start with as most are, but has a tendency to withdraw a bit (on her own planet!) if she can't quite fit in with those around her.  She has just had a year in Finland where she loves her nursery (kids start school at 7!) but doesn't speak enough Finnish yet to play with others through language - and so really misses having 'proper' friends.  I so wish that things will be a lot easier for her in Tasmania which is why I'm fretting more about the school than I usually would!

Having said that, Taroona sounds like such a lovely place, friendly and open, and I think we'll be very happy there!

I'll PM a couple of you a bit later when life's less hectic.  Thanks again




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