Jump to content

Abolish 'set' school holidays
Let families choose when to take their kids out of school


  • Please log in to reply
55 replies to this topic

#1 Snot stew

Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:43 AM

I heard this on the radio recently, proposed by someone (yes, I was listening very well - and I can't find info on it on Google).

The idea would be that schools would operate year-round, and parents would nominate when they wanted to take their kids out of school for holidays.  

WDYT?  Would you support this idea?


#2 cinnabubble

Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:45 AM

Not unless there were spectacularly good and very affordable year-round school holiday programs.

#3 PixieVee

Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:46 AM

It doesn't really sounds practical at all to me.

#4 unicorn

Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:47 AM

For our family it would work,  would be a bit if a logistical challenge for schools though.

#5 amabanana

Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:47 AM

And what about missed curriculum?  Or are schools going to teach differently too?

#6 Peppery

Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:49 AM

Wouldn't it be a nightmare for teachers??!

#7 niggles

Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:50 AM

Sounds completely loony. What do the students do when the teacher takes their holidays? How does the teacher plan with no idea or influence over which students will be present when?

#8 Mpjp is feral

Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:52 AM

Eltham College melbourne campus does exactly this (I think the school is called something else now).

My DS went to their ELC and we looked very closely at the school for that reason, and that reason alone!!! Pity we didnt warm to teh staff or Principal....maybe its because they hate their working rosters!



#9 Feral Grey Mare

Posted 13 February 2013 - 11:52 AM

I have a friend who works in the English education system where individual schools can program their own holidays. My friend and her husband teach in secondary schools  and both have different holidays to each other and their primary school aged daughter. For cases like this the pick-your-own-holiday could work but it just seems too disruptive to me.

#10 Julie3Girls

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:01 PM

I'd imagine in most cases it would be very disruptive to learning. While most schools will say that they plan to the individual children, fact is, the majority of work is taught to the class as a whole, with then additional allowances/effort/teaching to meet the needs of the individuals.

If you had kids dropping out any time during the year, it would mean the teacher who have to be tracking and repeating a lot of work.

Also, have you seen kids at the end of term?  A lot of kids get ratty, you can tell when the term is a long one, you can see that some of the kids simply need a break.
By letting parents simply pick and choose, you are taking away that even spacing of breaks that currently exist.  And what about parents who can't be bothered to sort out holidays.

Vacation care would be impossible, because it runs based on numbers, often in the school grounds. Working parents only get 4 weeks a year, what should they do the rest of the time?

Basically, not practical in my opinion.

#11 steppy

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:03 PM

No. Too hard on the teachers and the kids. Lots of parents would never give their kids a break.

#12 steppy

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:04 PM

Plus which, you can do this anyway as long as you're prepared to help the kids catch up.

#13 Jane Jetson

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:26 PM

I'd be concerned about vacation care accessibility, and about what the kids would miss during their chosen holidays - this way, everybody would miss *something*.

#14 FeralBob!

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:29 PM

Have I dropped into a time warp and woken up to discover it's actually April 1?  unsure.gif

Because that's were that loopy idea belongs....

#15 LambChop

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:34 PM

It depends on the teaching approach doesn't it, I mean, it would be fine for the most part in the Montessori School my children attend.

Where the approach is lesson plans and a consistent lesson for all children at the same time, then this would be trickier to juggle.

#16 KT1978

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:34 PM

I don't think that would work.  Possibly for senior students where you can work on a segment/module method, where they have several classes for each HSC unit, it could be a viable option.

ie everyone needs to study A, B and C in maths.  We are running these in Week 1, 5, 7. YOu must nominate the one you will attend... and so on.... so that the senior students can work to the pace that suits them (they already have free periods and time off before exams anyway).

It might also be good if schools/school districts could set their holidays, if they wanted to have them slightly different to the rest of the state.  Some areas have extreme heat, snow, harvest and other seasonal factors that might be unique to their area and being able to move holidays might be a good thing.  I'm not sure if some religious schools already do this for religious events?



#17 opethmum

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:54 PM

I think it will complicate a number of things,

Teachers and allowing times to programme their classes, pressure to not take holidays and placing them on contracts and rosters that make their family life suffer. Also if their children have different holidays additional economic burden to find care and programmes or the school not approving leave to take their child on holidays.

Children not getting breaks because their parents can't afford holidays normally and creating an us and them mentality in the school.

Creating a budgeting nightmare and could possibly create problems in funding school programmes and placing more stringent conditions on the money e.g. bums on seats rules etc and possibly state governments could use this an an excuse to strip away funding from schools.


#18 BadCat

Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:55 PM

It's a stupid idea.



#19 Sif

Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:01 PM

QUOTE
And what about missed curriculum? Or are schools going to teach differently too?


At my son's high school, they are implementing a curriculum where the students have online units they work through at home, and then in class they do collaborative work based on those units. Students have the opportunity to work 'ahead' if they wish and even do VCE from year 8 onwards if they are up to the challenge, they can also repeat units they want to improve their marks on.

This could be extended to primary school levels, I'm sure!

There was a school in Melbourne's CBD which runs year round so parents can take their children out to suit their work holidays.  It started this program maybe 2-3 years ago (I saw it on the news and thought it was quite innovative). I'm not sure if the school is still operating in this fashion or not, maybe an EB member has a child there and can let us know?

ETA: This would be the place I heard about... http://www.abc.net.au/news/2008-06-16/new-...ar-long/2472528

Edited by Sif, 13 February 2013 - 01:03 PM.


#20 vintage.blue

Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:04 PM

I don't think it's a good idea.

#21 cward

Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:07 PM

QUOTE
There was a school in Melbourne's CBD which runs year round so parents can take their children out to suit their work holidays. It started this program maybe 2-3 years ago (I saw it on the news and thought it was quite innovative). I'm not sure if the school is still operating in this fashion or not, maybe an EB member has a child there and can let us know?
  i would imagine in this scenario that teachers would be working on some sort of roster system and only taking 4 weeks annual leave so that would enable the school to be open all the time.  

I personally don't think it would work but my youngest DD would love it as she doesnt think there should be school holidays anyway, she wants to go to school all the time!

#22 FeralZombieMum

Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:08 PM

Whoever suggested it is obviously lacking in the ability to think about the consequences that would occur if this was ever implemented.

There are just so many things that would be affected.

#23 Sif

Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:17 PM

QUOTE
There are just so many things that would be affected.


Okay, like what? You have obviously thought about it, so tells us what would be affected.

This discussion is quite important because the current education system is not particularly user-friendly, and it is not efficiently use the technological innovations which are available to us. It's a 150 year old system working in time which has far removed from it's origins.

The current school system is not keeping up with the life style demands of families with working parents (being they sole parent families or dual employment families).

So, why not try to find a better way instead of just accepting the status quo - with have the tools to have a far more flexible education system, but we are not employing those tools.

#24 Bluenomi

Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:21 PM

If you want to pick when your child has school holidays, home school them. Otherwise just deal with the holidays set by the schools and government.

It would be a nightmare if they allowed. Can you imagine how many parents who end up suing school because little Johnny failed because of the parents stuffing around with holidays and missing school?

#25 Heather11

Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:27 PM

In effect a teacher could be teaching a class of 5 kids if all the others decide to take holidays at the same time.

Do you have to have your holidays approved? Do they have to be evenly spread?

What happens if I decide to take my kids out for 12 weeks at the end of the year?  

Vacation care would be a nightmare as it would have to be constantly being run.  It would have operate totally separate to the school and more like a daycare centre.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
  • The Boxtrolls is due for release September 18.

    Movie review: The Boxtrolls

    Alan Snow?s bestselling novel, Here Be Monsters, offered the creators of Coraline and ParaNorman the perfect tale for their latest stop-motion animation film about a family of box-dwelling trolls who live under the streets of Cheesebridge.

  • Lah-Lah's Adventures airs on the Cbeebies channel on Foxtel and Austar.

    'Lah-Lah's Adventures' a musical treat for young and old

    Sydney-siders with tiny tots have been loyal followers of the Lah-Lah band for many years but the boisterous children?s music group from the inner-west continue to grow their following with their own television series.

  • ek-houseofmagic-thumb

    Win a House of Magic prize pack

    To celebrate the release of the new movie House of Magic, we have 10 double passes and magic sets to give away just in time for these school holidays. Enter Now for a chance to win!

  • quotes-320

    Wise words from kids movies

    The movies we watched as kids had a lot more to offer than just entertainment. Here's ten wise quotes from kids movies.

  • yoda

    31 iconic family films from the 1980s

    If you grew up in the 1980s there will be a number of films that are close to your heart. Here are 31 of the most iconic for you to watch with your own kids.

  • cruella

    10 live-action remakes of famous animations

    After the success of "Maleficent" at the box office Disney is opening their vault to re-work the classics into live-action movies, and a number of other film studios are following suit. Here are ten live-action remakes to look forward to.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.