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considering studying teaching
online?


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#1 bokchok

Posted 22 February 2013 - 12:38 PM

hi there

I have always wanted to do teaching as well which is very diff to my work and qualifications in management consulting

I am wondering about best places online to do it, what the study is like and costs - wondering basically if it would be worthwhile or manageable to do

thanks

#2 OneDayDreamer

Posted 22 February 2013 - 01:49 PM

I'm finishing off my 4 year teaching degree at the moment. I have heard from teachers and principals in both the Catholic and Public system that online is not as highly regarded as actually attending uni itself.
That being said, i've also heard that many principals are not fans of the year/2 year masters degrees as at times the quality of teachers is not the same stadards as the 4 year degree.
Those are the two things I'd probably suggest you consider.
I attend ACU physically, so I can't tell you the best online place to study. The costs may be different for online study, but my HECS is charged around $2500 per semester for my degree. Again, if you do the Masters one/two year course, the charges might bedifferent.

Going back to uni is definately the bset thing I ever did, and I love teaching every day.  
Schools love 'mature age' students, as we have life experience and a better appreciation for the job. It's definately a managable course, but I'd urge you to physically attend uni if it is viable for you to do so - I can't imagine trying to do this degree online as it's so very involved, and there is so much peer learning and group work.

#3 tenar

Posted 22 February 2013 - 01:58 PM


I studied part time and by distance at Monash.  If you are interested in learning about that let me know and I'll PM you.  My experience was that people studying by distance had a very different experience to those doing the same subjects on campus.  

To be honest the first thing you need to work out is what specialisms you would do (if secondary), or whether you would qualify as a primary teacher.  Then work out whether there are actual jobs available in your area in those fields.   It's all very well to be passionate about teaching but if you can't get an ongoing job in the next decade then the shine will well and truly have rubbed off before then.

Then think about how you could fit in the study.  

I chose to study part time and by distance because I could fit that in alongside being a SAHM.  I did have to arrange childcare for 10 weeks of school placements each year, but the rest I could do during the evenings and weekends.  The cost was similar to the PP - worked out to about $5000/year.


#4 newphase

Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:07 PM

Some distance options for ED are thru UNE, Murdoch, OUA/Curtin..

#5 kerryhi

Posted 24 February 2013 - 09:15 AM

I did a Graduate Diploma of Education through Charles Darwin Uni and finished in June last year.  I was offered a contract for last year by my mentor school just as my course was finishing.  So I went straight from my final prac into a full time job.  This year the same school has given me a full year contract.
They were not bothered by the fact my degree was online, they were impressed with the work that I completed and my classroom practices.
Now that I am working, no one would know who did which degree or did them online/on campus.  I think it is a bit of a myth that schools care so much.  
I worked in retail/communications before so it's totally different to the type of work I was used to!  Oh, and I am OLD...lol...I was 42 when I finished my Grad Dip.
Good luck with your decision.  If its what you want to do then go for it!

Kerry

#6 EsmeLennox

Posted 24 February 2013 - 09:23 AM

I would not do my initial training as a teacher via distance ed if I could possibly help it. Teaching is one of those careers where you genuinely learn enormous amounts by training with other people. Well, you continue learning as a teacher from your peers all the time. The sharing and discussions about pedagogy, curriculum and strategy are worth their weight in gold. I've been teaching 16 years and I still learn new things on a regular basis from talking to other teachers. I would however, consider my masters via distance.

#7 PatG

Posted 24 February 2013 - 09:37 AM

Make sure you take into account that you will have to do full time prac blocks.  

Are you planning to do a Grad Dip or an Education degree?

#8 bokchok

Posted 24 February 2013 - 02:45 PM

thanks everyone for your awesome input all good points to take in.

im still looking into the options and what I would be interested in doing and it depends on what happens with my work situation - working is not an option hence the "distance" option

there is a lot to consider that's for sure

#9 Atomac

Posted 24 February 2013 - 03:16 PM

I am doing my degree in primary teaching through OUA/ Curtin and it is fantastic. You still get to have the discussions with your peers, except it is done via the computer.

#10 BlondieUK

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:50 AM

QUOTE (tenar @ 22/02/2013, 12:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I studied part time and by distance at Monash.  If you are interested in learning about that let me know and I'll PM you.  My experience was that people studying by distance had a very different experience to those doing the same subjects on campus.  

To be honest the first thing you need to work out is what specialisms you would do (if secondary), or whether you would qualify as a primary teacher.  Then work out whether there are actual jobs available in your area in those fields.   It's all very well to be passionate about teaching but if you can't get an ongoing job in the next decade then the shine will well and truly have rubbed off before then.


Agree with tenar on both these counts. I did my GradDipEd thourgh Monash, part time and distance. To be brief - we got done. But, I also know that the lecturer who was the most problematic (not giving adequate time to distance students; setting a syllabus based on her research interests rather than on focusing on training teachers etc etc) no longer works there after a myriad of complaints from students. I also know that the Ed Faculty has had quite a shake up since then. I chose to go back to Monash for a distance ed, PT Masters, and it's been great. Like tenar, PM me if you want details.

And about the jobs - if you can do your training in Maths, Science or a foreign language, then go for it. Any other subject area is going to require some pretty careful research and thinking.


#11 twinsmom

Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:49 PM

Can I join in and ask whether the online masters will enable you to be registered as a primary/pre-primary teacher?  

Thank you

#12 Beancat

Posted 01 March 2013 - 06:23 AM

QUOTE (tenar @ 22/02/2013, 02:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I studied part time and by distance at Monash.  If you are interested in learning about that let me know and I'll PM you.  My experience was that people studying by distance had a very different experience to those doing the same subjects on campus.  

To be honest the first thing you need to work out is what specialisms you would do (if secondary), or whether you would qualify as a primary teacher.  Then work out whether there are actual jobs available in your area in those fields.   It's all very well to be passionate about teaching but if you can't get an ongoing job in the next decade then the shine will well and truly have rubbed off before then.

Then think about how you could fit in the study.  

I chose to study part time and by distance because I could fit that in alongside being a SAHM.  I did have to arrange childcare for 10 weeks of school placements each year, but the rest I could do during the evenings and weekends.  The cost was similar to the PP - worked out to about $5000/year.


This was course I did too, I just finished last year.  I did it for similar reasons. For the first year I worked and the second year I had a baby 6 weeks before the start of semester 2.  I am not sure if it was just me as a mature age student, but I found the course somewhat lacking in several areas.  I understand this course (via the Churchill campus) is moving under the administration of Ballarat University from 2014.

You have not mentioned if you'll be doing primary or secondary.  As PP said the job prospects for some secondary specialisations is pretty ordinary. There seems to be far more opportunities for Primary teachers.

#13 Chchgirl

Posted 01 March 2013 - 06:55 AM

Many people do it now. Curtin is good, I did two years through that (not doing anymore due to family circumstances) but I liked them. My study buddies are all finishing this year!

Good luck either way!

#14 bokchok

Posted 09 March 2013 - 11:40 AM

thanks all

I was thinking of primary studies

do any of you utilise vet fee help or whatever for the fees and is it ok and manageable?

#15 jm3

Posted 10 March 2013 - 10:12 PM

I graduated from the OUA/Curtin Primary degree last year and I take exception at the comment that teaching is best studied face to face.  As mature age students studying a four year full time degree online we had to demonstrate incredible commitment, resilience and motivation to get through it.  I graduated with HD average and completed 19 weeks of full time placements as an "online" student.



#16 hiddensecrets

Posted 15 March 2013 - 01:27 AM

QUOTE (jm3 @ 10/03/2013, 08:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I graduated from the OUA/Curtin Primary degree last year and I take exception at the comment that teaching is best studied face to face.  As mature age students studying a four year full time degree online we had to demonstrate incredible commitment, resilience and motivation to get through it.  I graduated with HD average and completed 19 weeks of full time placements as an "online" student.


I am glad someone else has come out and said this

#17 Chchgirl

Posted 15 March 2013 - 06:48 AM

QUOTE (jm3 @ 10/03/2013, 11:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I graduated from the OUA/Curtin Primary degree last year and I take exception at the comment that teaching is best studied face to face.  As mature age students studying a four year full time degree online we had to demonstrate incredible commitment, resilience and motivation to get through it.  I graduated with HD average and completed 19 weeks of full time placements as an "online" student.


Congratulations!

I agree and have done plenty of online study (am doing more again at the moment!) and in the past did my childcare diploma online and my training at various centres, no different to tafe which do it all online now too..I prefer it and am more focused personally. I remember all the people saying I wouldn't be able to get a job as I did it online, my boss at the time said it didn't matter as long as the qualification was nationally recognised.

I checked about registration when I started the Curtin in 2009 so I do know you can register as a teacher..

#18 ♥believer♥

Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:10 PM

I have done a B.Bus online through OUA and am finishing off my Grad.Dip.Ed. online through UNE.

OUA was a get-it-done job. I felt that the study time was too short, not enough support, and flipping from uni to uni with different online systems lead to me constantly trying to catch up. It could also have been that the unit that did my major was particularly poor?

I cannot recommend UNE highly enough. They have been competent, resourceful, engaging and thorough. I work hard and get good results. My prac supervisors have said that I am well taught and have already been offered a teaching job (sadly not in an area that I now live).

The decision between primary and secondary was difficult for me, and still plays on my mind. I chose secondary because I've previously taught at TAFE and felt that I could transfer my skills better, and could more fully enjoy the aspects of teaching that I loved - facilitation of peer to peer learning and engagement. Added to that, my children are both ASD and require significant amounts of my time. I spoke to many teachers and felt confident that secondary teaching would allow for part time or casual work in a way that I know I could not do well if I was job-sharing in a primary teaching position.

Good luck original.gif

#19 roses99

Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:20 PM

I was a full-time journalist who studied my Grad Dip Ed by distance (through UNE), part-time over two years.

I only had to do 2 x four week pracs, and I took annual leave to do this.

Could my course have been more comprehensive? Of course. A four year Bachelor degree really can't compare with a one year Grad Dip. But I have followed it up with five years of supply teaching and I am pretty confident I have build up some really solid experience as a teacher.

These days you're unlikely to find a one year grad dip as they're all being replaced by two year programs. And that's probably not a bad thing.

I'd seriously consider a university that specialises in distance education. UNE is one, USQ (disclaimer: I work for USQ's Faculty of Education) is another. Both offer great courses.

#20 BlondieUK

Posted 17 March 2013 - 06:11 PM

Whichever course you choose, make sure that they are covering the Australian National Curriculum, rather than a state based approach - or, at least a mix of the two.

#21 axiomae

Posted 17 March 2013 - 06:21 PM

Don't stress about it. As a teacher with 10 years experience I can tell you that your real education starts in the classroom. Nothing you learn from coursework will be as valuable as what you learn from your pracs and your first year teaching.

#22 lottiebobs

Posted 14 June 2013 - 08:03 PM

I'm currently thinking about enrolling in the Grad Dip or Masters in Primary Teaching through Swinburne Online.. does anyone have any experience (good or bad!) of this course?  I've been thinking about changing career to teaching for quite some time now and am only now in a financial position to make the move.  would love to hear about other people's experiences of balancing online study and parenting!  My 2 are both at primary school and I am planning to eventually quit my 4 day a week job to focus on study but might try to do it all for a short time to save some cash.




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