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Obstetricians charge so much!
proffessional care


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#26 Nepheline

Posted 10 April 2013 - 09:11 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 10/04/2013, 07:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Have never ever done this? Can I ask where this was?


I got asked the questions at the RHW in Randwick (NSW). She apologised, said she had to ask them and then rattled them all off quickly...

#27 cinnabubble

Posted 10 April 2013 - 09:17 PM

I had them at two Sydney public hospitals (not Blacktown). They're just part of the standard checklist of first visit things.

#28 Soontobegran

Posted 10 April 2013 - 09:18 PM

Interesting that the presumption seems to be that if you are private then you are not at risk......how wrong is that. huh.gif


#29 Guest_bottle~rocket_*

Posted 10 April 2013 - 09:20 PM

QUOTE (wannabe30 @ 10/04/2013, 09:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Nor me.  I was a private patient, though.

I wonder if there's an assumption that if you show up for your extremely expensive appointment with hubby in a suit, etc, that you're not an "at risk" category.  Sounds like a massively big assumption to me!


Yes it sounds like it is public hospital procedure only.  There was nothing like that discussed at my OB appointments, it was very much just a medical focus.  It seems midwives in antenatal appointments are much better at covering the psychosocial stuff such as mental health and DV which is also extremely important.

Edited by bottle~rocket, 10 April 2013 - 09:20 PM.


#30 SplashingRainbows

Posted 10 April 2013 - 09:24 PM

I'm sure I was asked by my OB and at the hospital and I went private.

I suspect the variation in private experiences is that the Ob answers to themselves whereas hospital midwives answer to a large publicly run organization overseen by state based health policy.

#31 Slootsky

Posted 10 April 2013 - 09:37 PM

Depending on your health needs and bir
th you're seeking, perhaps also consider a private midwife instead? You may be able to organise antenatal appointments that suit both you & your partner, possibly discharge early from hospital early and receive continuous support at home...
					
					

#32 lucky 2

Posted 10 April 2013 - 09:44 PM

QUOTE
I suspect the variation in private experiences is that the Ob answers to themselves whereas hospital midwives answer to a large publicly run organization overseen by state based health policy.

The OB answers to her/him self, her/his patient, the Hospital, his insurance company and the registering body that allows her/him to practice.
It's not as simple as it appears to be.
There are many controls on the care provided by both OB's and MW's (scope of practice, codes of ethics, codes of conduct as well as all of the clinical and medico-legal considerations etc).


#33 louisejacqui

Posted 10 April 2013 - 09:52 PM

Given your financial situation look at the other options.

Take your partner to first appointment, leave him in the room, go in the room and confirm no domestic violence issues and would like partner in the room
Complain like someone else said
Consider if you can get into Windsor public hospital. People have made comments on here before that the care is better because there is a better midwife to patient ratio/less births per year.
http://www.hdhs.com.au/Public-Hospital/default


If you cant afford something, you cant afford it, consider the above

#34 eachschoolholidays

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:01 PM

I used an OB for both pregnancies but it did not cause us financial difficulty to do so.

Save your money.

Someone I work with is seriously struggling financially, maxed out credit cards, high home loan etc.   A couple of us tried to suggest that in most cases, it was not worth getting into financial difficuty with a baby on the way.  Don't forget that you could also be up for the cost of an anaethetist and asst surgeon if you end up with an emergency c-section.  In addition to the cost of the OB, there were probably about another $2000 in costs.   He is just hoping that that doesn't happen because he literally won't have the money to pay for it.   ohmy.gif

#35 Freddie'sMum

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:09 PM

Firstly OP - congrats on your pregnancy.

It is very exciting - esp your first original.gif

If you can't afford private health cover - and as you are already pregnant - most private health cover you have a 12 month waiting period - then you will probably be excluded.

Save your money and see if you can go to a birth centre attached to a hospital / with hopefully seeing the same midwives for the duration of your pregnancy.

I will say I went private both times with my pregnancies (we could afford it and had saved for years beforehand) and was never asked about DV, so I learnt something new today.



#36 Lokum

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:16 PM

QUOTE (nlman @ 10/04/2013, 10:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I used an OB for both pregnancies but it did not cause us financial difficulty to do so.

Save your money.

...  In addition to the cost of the OB, there were probably about another $2000 in costs.


My pregnancy included my OB fee ($3500), first appointment ($240-ish), 3 scans (approx $200 each. )
A little back from Medicare for each of these.

PLUS - around $800 in endocrinologist fees (most back from Medicare as we had reached the safety net.)
PLUS - around $200 in insulin, diabetic test strips, battery for BGL monitor and needles etc even with NDSS

PLUS - $3500 anaesthetist fees, with Medicare/Medibank covering only $980 of this.
PLUS - $800 in paediatrician fees (most of this back from Medicare.)

If we had gone public, I would have paid almost none of the above. And almost certainly have received the same level of care. I might have even ended up with the same OB doing my surgery. It's a very expensive luxury, esp if you can't afford it.

#37 Guest_Wyn99_*

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:17 PM

I was asked the DV / previous pregnancies question at Royal North Shore in Sydney. My mum was with me and they asked her to leave the room - I had no idea why at the time. I then moved to regional NSW and was asked the same question, so must be standard practice in NSW public hospitals. I have had 3 children through the public system and would definitely recommend it. Even with thryoid issues I saw the hospital obsetrician at no cost. DP was with me for all labours. All my children were born between 5-7am so DP went home for a sleep when I left the birth suite for my room. I do not see the need for fathers to 'stay' with new mums 24/7 post birth, besides if there are no complications you are back home pretty soon.

#38 Riotproof

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:20 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 10/04/2013, 07:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Have never ever done this? Can I ask where this was?

In nsw, they ask that any accompanying adults stay outside for the DV part of the interview, but they don't tell you why.

I would never bother getting dh to come another first appointment.. It's all family history stuff, and generally based of the mother.

#39 Jingleflea

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:29 PM

I went private in the ACT for my birth and wasn't asked about DV, but my OB was also my gyno and I'd known her for a few years by then, plus she'd seen me with my husband and met him etc so possibly she'd already got a feel for the relationship already.
Or maybe it's not asked here...



#40 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:37 PM

QUOTE (Wyn99 @ 10/04/2013, 10:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was asked the DV / previous pregnancies question at Royal North Shore in Sydney. My mum was with me and they asked her to leave the room - I had no idea why at the time. I then moved to regional NSW and was asked the same question, so must be standard practice in NSW public hospitals.

I suspect they do this to assist women to answer without pressure, coercion or intimidation by other people who may be present - partners, parents or children.

#41 FeralHez

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:49 PM

I am in the same geographical area as op and was never asked the DV questions by gp, OB, midwives, clinic nurse, anyone.

Some of those caregivers were public system but my OB and hospital were private. Dh was not present at mot appointments due to his work.

No it is not cheap. Even in the private hospital there was no bed for dh in birth suite and he was not able to stay with us overnight.

My OB with dd was over $1500 but under $2k (2 years ago), if we can get the pms to work op I will give you his name. But note due to his personality/bedside manner I have sought a different OB for my second pregnancy.

#42 FeralFemboside

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:49 PM

I did get asked DV/support/mental health questions going public in NSW at RPA.

I didn't get asked going private in QLD.

#43 angelinaballerina

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:54 PM

It is a standard form to fill in at your hospital appt in WA at the public maternity hospital here. But they only ask you to fill it out when your partner/or family members are not present. Usually done at your 20week visit. And then again at around 36 weeks.

#44 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:56 PM

Ive had two appointments in WA through the public system here and so far and been asked twice about DV. I was alone at the appointment so not sure if they would have asked DH to leave had he been with me.

#45 MoonPie

Posted 10 April 2013 - 11:02 PM

I can't really comment on the DV question, but I can on the private system.

An obstetrician is on call all. the. time. Literally, any hour of any day or night, they are duty bound to answer the phone and come to the hospital if needed. They could be in the office 100m down the corridor, or they could be at dinner with their kids, in bed with their partner, cycling, at the movies, etc etc. If they want to be 'off call' for any time, be it an afternoon or 2 weeks, they need to get one of the other obs to cover their phone calls and patients for that time. Which means at some point, they will have double the patient load (and double the call ins etc) while they cover someone else.

What's more, the responsibility for the health of you and your baby is solely and completely on them.

I have a lot of criticism towards the private system and private obs, but their rate of pay is NOT one of them.

#46 GenWhy

Posted 10 April 2013 - 11:21 PM

I've had a child at a public hospital and 2 at private in WA. I've never been asked anything. I also had a stillborn and surgery to remove a caesarean ectopic at the maternity hospital in WA and never been asked.

I've had to fill out the multi answer form for the Edinburgh scale at a public hospital with DD1. No one ever spoke to me about my answers though. Interesting.

Congrats on your pregnancy OP! I went private with my 1st then transferred to public at 8 months pregnant due to work no longer covering obstetrics. I then went private with the next 2 and used a GP for my appt and for delivery at the hospital. I didn't pay anything out of pocket as I had no gap cover. With the 3rd I did have a payment for the anaesthetist as I had a c/s. But it was only around $270. Maybe using a GP at a private hospital would eliminate costs?

I don't know much about other states but personally if it were WA I'd go to KEMH public if I ever had another baby.

#47 feralangel

Posted 10 April 2013 - 11:25 PM

Hi OP,

My sister gave birth to her 2 children at blacktown hospital and both birthing experiences were very positive.

Because both of her pregnancies were considered low risk, she gave birth in the midwife-led birthing suites.

The rooms, from memory, were quite lovely, just like a hotel room, including double bed and spa bath, and her DP stayed with her throughout the labour and birth and for 2 days after.

Both of my sister's labours were natural (that is, no pain relieving drugs were allowed to be admistered).

However, the hospital also has a regular labour war where drugs, amongst other things, are administered if need be.I imagine that your Dp would be allowed to stay with you during labour and birth I a regular ward, but would otherwise have to restrict his visits to set times.

Anyway, congratulations and good luck. I wish you well.








#48 Justaduck

Posted 10 April 2013 - 11:33 PM

QUOTE (Steggles @ 10/04/2013, 07:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yes the DV questions are also standard in QLD original.gif


I didn't get asked this - my discharge sheet said "Unable to ask"


#49 Soontobegran

Posted 10 April 2013 - 11:44 PM

QUOTE (Riotproof @ 10/04/2013, 10:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
In nsw, they ask that any accompanying adults stay outside for the DV part of the interview, but they don't tell you why.

I would never bother getting dh to come another first appointment.. It's all family history stuff, and generally based of the mother.


Many women do bring their partners to every visit though and I honestly think the chances of a women answering anything about DV whilst their partner is waiting outside the door is remote. I'd support the mother being given a phone number which would allow her to call at a time that was comfortable to her to reveal any personal issues rather than being expected to do so on request.
It seems that as it is only policy at some places and only asked at the discretion of the obstetrician it can't be mandatory?

I am aware of MCHN's asking this question though.




#50 Princess.cranky.pants

Posted 10 April 2013 - 11:47 PM

QUOTE
It makes sense but it must be hospital specific perhaps. Just did a whip around of DD's and none were asked.


I asked about DV with each of my pregnancies and I went though two different QLD hospitals. I was also asked about finances, was DH happy we were having a baby, what support I had, history of depression..

OP I had 3 babies in the public system and medical staff always involved my DH. He was just as important as I was in the whole process.




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