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HomeSchool in QLD? Help!


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#1 MickeyBoo

Posted 07 May 2013 - 07:53 AM

Hi,
We have made the decision to homeschool our DS1 who is turning 11, he has Aspergers and High Anxiety. This year has basically been a write off with bullying and a school that is happy to blame him for snapping after weeks of torment, but not willing to hold the bullies accountable for their actions.

Can anyone help with what i need to do or provide for him in a homeschooling environment? Or any online forums that I can find info in?

We've been told about Groves Christian College and their Distance Ed, and they seem to be pretty good with what they offer, (although we are not religious so not sure how that will go with them) does anyone know of any others out there? We are in SE QLD.

Any help would be appreciated, especially with resources as I'm trying to set up his lesson plans while we're getting everything sorted.

Thanks

Edited by MickeyBoo, 07 May 2013 - 09:29 AM.


#2 TheFirstNoel

Posted 07 May 2013 - 08:05 AM

Hi MickeyBoo

Sorry to hear that your son has had such a rough time.  It's not fair at all.

First step for homeschooling info is the Home Education Australia website - http://www.hea.edu.au/  Under their 'getting started' tab they have state specific information.  You don't have to go through distance education if you don't want to, and if your son has special needs (& if you're not religious) then I'd probably even advise against it - however that is of course your choice, many people find it comforting to have an umbrella like a distance education school, especially in the beginning.

Also, under the 'support' tab you can look up local home education support groups.  They will be able to give you state specific info about what you need to do.  I'm in Vic so the laws are different.

As for support forums, there is a couple of australian one's that are great - http://www.rockpoolhomeschool.com/
http://aussiehomeschool.com.au/  - this one is great but does have a lot of Christian members.

If you let me know what sort of resources you're after I can most certainly give you some information, what are your son's strengths/weakness' etc.  There are some really fantastic resources out there!

We've been homeschooling from the beginning (my oldest is now grade 3 at home) and love it.  Feel free to PM me if you like.

Good luck!

#3 MickeyBoo

Posted 07 May 2013 - 09:32 AM

Thanks for all the links Leisamd, will check them out today!

Resources would be things like lesson plan outlines for me, maths worksheets, english worksheets, whats expected in the curriculum in year 5 for QLD so that I can create work plans based on what he needs to work towards?

#4 TheFirstNoel

Posted 07 May 2013 - 09:55 AM

Yep, no worries.  The HEA state info should give you contact information.  There should be someone who you can speak to to give you specific information.  I can't get the page to load atm though or I'd find a link!

Actually, here's a link to the qld government site - http://education.qld.gov.au/parents/home-e...tion/index.html - they have contact details for the Home Education Unit (HEU) which is there to provide guidance to parents.  I'd give them a call first.  They should be able to give you more information about what is expected for each grade level.  
They also have a planning page which looks pretty interesting.

As far as lesson plans, there is quite a lot of curriculum written specifically for homeschoolers, so they often include lesson plans/teacher's manuals etc.
Many homeschooler's I know use a maths program of their choice and supplement with an australian one used in schools (having a mental blank at the moment...)

Finding and connecting with other homeschoolers is probably going to be your gold mine for finding resources!  To that end, I'd check out the state groups on the HEA site, & here's an interesting site 'Connecting Qld Homeschoolers' - http://connectinghomeschoolers.ning.com/

One maths option that I can suggest is called 'Mathematics Enhancement Program' - it is a UK developed maths program, is available for free online (lesson plans, copymasters, practice books etc.) and is excellent.  I've used some of it in younger grades and found it really good.  Here's the link for grade 5 http://www.cimt.plymouth.ac.uk/projects/me...fault.htm#year5


Now, not to overwhelm you I'll leave it there!
original.gif

#5 mollybot

Posted 07 May 2013 - 10:09 AM

I'd just like to chime in here and say to check out the Workbox method !! I'm fairly new to homeschooling and I've found it after 7 months, so I thought I'd save you some time biggrin.gif

Its not a curriculum - its a way of organising your daily activities. Its straightforward and helps a child to become more self-directed. It was originally developed for children with Austism, but the homeschooling community has taken it up with gusto as its such a useful way of organising your children's work and encouraging them to work by themselves.

This is a good place to start: http://heartofwisdom.com/blog/workbox-directory/ there are loads of free printables, labels etc on the Internet.

Also - its Coreonos which does the Australian curriculum : http://www.coroneos.com.au/  including their homeschooling series.

What I wouldn't do (which is what I did) is to shell out a huge sum of money for a Curriculum, and then discover that your child hates it and refuses to use it biggrin.gif biggrin.gif

Many places like Maths Mammoth, Singapore Math, Saxon Maths etc have freebies which you can try on your child to see what they like. Math Mammoth is very highly regarded and is the cheapest. She also does a stack of freebies. http://www.mathmammoth.com/

Check out http://www.homeschoolreviews.com/reviews/default.aspx if you want more info on a particular product. Its a really useful little site.

Also; Pinterest, although is a time-sink, is fabulous for ideas and freebies.

Likewise, I'm going to stop here. There's a stack of information out there, but these are the ones I found most useful ! Do PM me if you'd like more info !!

Good luck ! Its great and I'm SO glad I did it biggrin.gif

#6 JJ

Posted 07 May 2013 - 10:47 AM

QUOTE (mollybot @ 07/05/2013, 10:09 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What I wouldn't do (which is what I did) is to shell out a huge sum of money for a Curriculum, and then discover that your child hates it and refuses to use it biggrin.gif biggrin.gif


I agree with this - it's easy to go overboard and get a lot of resources when you first start, only to realise that half of them are not really suited to your needs.

Some trial and error is inevitable though - we've only been HS for a bit over 6 months and we're on our third maths curriculum already. I think we've finally found "the one", but the only way to get to that point was to try the others for a while and then based on that, determine why they didn't work very well.

I like the Coroneos homeschooling series too, although some of their books don't seem to have been proof-read and contain a lot of silly spelling errors, which bugs me a bit. Well, a lot actually, but not enough to ditch them. I've been using them as cautionary examples for DD as to what happens if you don't know your spelling and don't proof-read. tongue.gif

Not much more to add as PPs have already given you a lot of great information. Good luck... HS really is the best option for some kids - my DD has been so much happier ever since we started and it has been a great learning journey for both of us. original.gif

Edited by JJ, 07 May 2013 - 10:54 AM.


#7 MickeyBoo

Posted 07 May 2013 - 04:17 PM

Thanks for the great replies! No info overload, I'm grateful for it! Keep it coming original.gif

QUOTE
What I found helpful was to set aside a room  that she only used for schooling, so she could have a clear devision of  school and home.  She ate in the dining room still but did her school  room in our spare room/office/study area.  It was only ever used as a  bedroom on weekends or school holidays, and had a futon in there, so it  didn't look like a bedroom when not in use as one.


Yep, he has a desk set up right next to mine seeing as I am working from mine most of the day I can keep an eye on what he's up to and help stop any distractions. So far so good!

I guess the only other question I have is what do people do for social interaction? Outings/excursions etc? I'm hesitant to go all in for the curriculum package if I can set something up for myself, but I was interested in their workshops and camps and wondered if there were things like that around the place, he loves his art and I think it would be good if he were able to find a friend or two along the way which is something else he's struggled with.

#8 Acidulous Osprey

Posted 07 May 2013 - 04:31 PM

In Qld you can use a private provider like Groves (v religious), distance education through the BSDE (should be free if you can get a doctor to sign off on the medical reasons for homeschooling) or your own program through the Home Education office.

The third option is the one I would recommend, especially as he recovers from the school experience.  You can set up a program which is directly tailored to his needs, including his emotional needs.  BSDE do have a reasonably high expectation of participation in their program and you have to do quite a lot of schoolwork.  I found them very inflexible and unpleasant to deal with but others have found differently.

You are eligible to apply for the Isolated Child Allowance through centrelink on medical grounds.

Socially?  Have a look at some of the respite programs around you which might run afterschool care or Saturday programs or holidays programs.  You might find a good fit with your local homeschoolers as well.

#9 TheFirstNoel

Posted 07 May 2013 - 05:09 PM

Socially, options will depend on your area.  My kids have made friends through our homeschool group, which meets fortnightly, as well as through their private music lessons.  The HEA site has support group info and so does the connecting queensland homeschoolers link.

Homeschooler's also tend to put a lot of stock in socialising within the community - not just in homeschool only circles - so I'd be looking around at community centres for art classes/clubs and see what's available.  Ditto for sport or music or whatever interests your son has.  I don't know specifically what's in your area, but I'd bet that the people at the HEU can give you some good ideas.


#10 2bundles

Posted 07 May 2013 - 07:27 PM

Good luck with it. Does your DS want to do homeschooling?  Mine didn't. We looked for a new school that would accept him for who he is and we haven't looked back.

Not all schools allow asd kids to be bullied and blamed for their high maintenance behaviours?

#11 MickeyBoo

Posted 07 May 2013 - 10:50 PM

QUOTE (2bundles @ 07/05/2013, 07:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Good luck with it. Does your DS want to do homeschooling?  Mine didn't. We looked for a new school that would accept him for who he is and we haven't looked back.   Not all schools allow asd kids to be bullied and blamed for their high maintenance behaviours?

  
We spoke to him in previous years about homeschooling and he was a bit iffy but at the start of this term when it all reached its breaking point and blew up we gave him the option and he said that he wanted homeschool. I've spent the last two weeks applying to other schools and researching home school options, one was a private school that is in our price range that has a great anti-bullying system but they said they are full. The other public school near me that I have been told has a great spec ed unit told me that due to their Enrolment Management Plan they couldn't take him as he was out of catchment, and they would only make an exception if the guidance counsellor at his current school wrote a letter outlining how the school failed in their duty if care towards him regarding the bullying going unresolved for so long. That is really not going to happen!


We are currently seeing a psych for him too because of the escalation of his behaviours this term, she asked him about homeschooling and how he felt etc and atvthe end she said that she agreed we'd made the right choice for him, so I'm happy with that for now. He's already so much calmer and I feel like I have my little boy back instead of a raging stranger everyday.

Edited by MickeyBoo, 07 May 2013 - 10:51 PM.


#12 2bundles

Posted 08 May 2013 - 06:33 AM

MickeyBoo - great. I also have a 10yr old DS with asd. We are inner city Brisbane if your DS needs/wants a play date.

Sounds like you and your DS are both looking forward to it. We did look at Dist Ed as it is aligned with the school curriculum. I was hoping it would only be for a few years and he would go back to school.  I think your end goal needs to factor into your choice of HS style.



#13 MickeyBoo

Posted 09 May 2013 - 09:35 AM

Thanks 2bundles - might take you up on that offer of a meet up one day!

There is a lot of information to take in thats for sure.

With the registration process, how detailed do you have to make your philosophy statement, and would anyone care to share an example of theirs so that I can get a feel for what is required/acceptable?

I'm still trawling through forums trying to figure out all of the different philosophies, trying to work out what is going to work best for us, does anyone have a brief explanation of each one?

#14 2bundles

Posted 09 May 2013 - 07:48 PM

Any time.

#15 newphase

Posted 09 May 2013 - 08:46 PM

http://education.qld.gov.au/curriculum/distance/

Others have mentioned, but not homeschooling in the traditional sense.

My daughter has just started with BSDE on Monday this week...13, yr 8.

As I work FT out of the home, traditional HS wasn't an option...as a single parent too.

Early days yet to see if I will be happy with them and the ED my daughter will recieve. They have online classes scheduled each day for Maths, Science, English, SOSE, Art and German...my daughter is exempt from languages this yr...as they wanted her to catch up to the start of the yr....meltdown city if that were to be the case, though she wanted to do German.

So far they have been very helpful, and available. Had a few glitches on Monday...passwords being unavailable for online class for one subject, and her not being enrolled in science and trying to get that sorted. And my DD was a tad anxious...but not the meltdown that would surround school...she was a lot calmer and quick to bounce back....hope that continues.

I have also applied for distance ED in VIC which is where I am (Melb) but have to wait for Dr's appts, forms signed, Dept Ed approval pending too...didn't have to wait with BSDE...for a fee, but that is because I am not a QLD resident. May stay with them, time will tell. VIC distance ED a way different set up so depends what will suit my daughter best for the rest of this yr and next. (in VIC I have to reapply every yr for approval too which sux...Dr's visits, forms filled in, dept ed approval).

All the best for your sons journey. Hope it works well for you both. original.gif

Edited by newphase, 09 May 2013 - 09:04 PM.


#16 JJ

Posted 10 May 2013 - 09:18 AM

QUOTE (MickeyBoo @ 09/05/2013, 09:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
With the registration process, how detailed do you have to make your philosophy statement, and would anyone care to share an example of theirs so that I can get a feel for what is required/acceptable?


Have a look on the HEA website - there are quite a few examples on there. I found them very helpful when writing ours. It ended up being quite detailed, but then I do like to ramble (and I enjoyed writing it). tongue.gif I find I don't refer to it very often though - the philosophy changes and evolves over time. You really have to get started and figure out what works best for you and your child as you go along, IYKWIM? So don't restrict yourself too much at the beginning. The nice thing about HS is that you can make adjustments and change your mind to suit your needs.

Re. socialising, I've found that DD has probably done more of that since she left school, as she has more energy (school exhausted her so much that she'd often just come home and spend the rest of the day on the couch, not even wanting to think about seeing friends or doing any kind of activity). Also, it is what I would consider better "quality" socialising, with people she likes and has something in common with, rather than just being part of the same crowd at school day in, day out.

Edited by JJ, 10 May 2013 - 09:25 AM.


#17 MsJadeBenny

Posted 16 August 2014 - 11:18 AM

 MickeyBoo, on 07 May 2013 - 07:53 AM, said:

Hi,
We have made the decision to homeschool our DS1 who is turning 11, he has Aspergers and High Anxiety. This year has basically been a write off with bullying and a school that is happy to blame him for snapping after weeks of torment, but not willing to hold the bullies accountable for their actions.

Can anyone help with what i need to do or provide for him in a homeschooling environment? Or any online forums that I can find info in?

We've been told about Groves Christian College and their Distance Ed, and they seem to be pretty good with what they offer, (although we are not religious so not sure how that will go with them) does anyone know of any others out there? We are in SE QLD.

Any help would be appreciated, especially with resources as I'm trying to set up his lesson plans while we're getting everything sorted.

Thanks

Hello MickeyBoo,

I am sorry to hear that about your son. I am from Queensland and my daughter have online classes scheduled too. Homeschooling is really a big help. All the best for your sons journey. Hope it works well for you both.

Regards,
Jade

#18 just roses

Posted 16 August 2014 - 11:44 AM

I'm not a homeschooling parent, but a number of my friends have done it. Two of them went through a Christian provider (think it was Groves) and were reasonably happy. Both were able to power through lessons in a few hours a day. One of the friends is a former teacher, so supplemented with her own resources/lesson plans.

Another went with a Queensland School of Distance Education for a child in year 2 and a child in prep. She found it really, really full on. The C2C curriculum is absolutely packed. They did it for a year and then found a school they were happy with.

Of course, C2C is only for primary so you'd be out of that before long anyway.

#19 Acidulous Osprey

Posted 16 August 2014 - 12:51 PM

Zombie thread :)

#20 JustBeige

Posted 16 August 2014 - 04:32 PM

 Feral Nicety, on 16 August 2014 - 12:51 PM, said:

Zombie thread :)
Oh lol. It took me aages to figure out what you meant :doh:

I think it fine. it just seems like a newbie and its not too badly out of date Posted Image

#21 just roses

Posted 16 August 2014 - 11:13 PM

 Feral Nicety, on 16 August 2014 - 12:51 PM, said:

Zombie thread Posted Image
Ahhh. D'oh.




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