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Thoughts creeping up to quit Bfing.. already


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#51 TobiasFLK

Posted 11 May 2013 - 04:01 PM

Babies died from formula???

Bulls#*t.  Ffs that is ridiculous.

Op it is really tough at the beginning. I hated bf at the beginning and set myself small goals. 3 months only, this pushed back to 6. At the end ds self weaned around 15 months.

I also understand bf in public is hard. Took me months to feel comfortable and even then I had multiple shawls over me.

I suggest you aim for 12 weeks. Then reassess how it is all going. My guess is you will find a rhythm and baby will have a more predictable routine.

Good luck.

#52 Freddie'sMum

Posted 11 May 2013 - 04:16 PM

Hi OP

As baby is only 1 week old - and it latching on easily - I would stick to it.

I had problems with both my 2 x DDs - and couldn't get them to latch on properly - lead to a lot of tears and frustrations.

Your SOLE focus right now is the baby - absolutely everything else can wait - your DH needs to step up and get the housework / cleaning / grocery shopping under control.  Hire a cleaner for the first few months of baby's life - ask family and friends to pop round with a home cooked meal - get takeaways.

Again, your SOLE focus is the baby - sleep when she sleeps - feed on demand and just let the day drift by.

Don't worry about a routine / pattern right now - there really isn't one.  She is only 1 week old - she has just been born and simply needs you - and your DH.  Once you finish a breastfeed - physically give him the baby and go to bed.  He can bath baby, cuddle baby, change nappies, dress her and put her down for a sleep - even if "down for a sleep" is he puts the baby sling on and walks around the house with her sleeping on his chest !!

I am not going to bother answering the "formula feed babies (correct spelling) die".  It is simply not relevant here in Australia with access to clean water and formula.


#53 lucky 2

Posted 11 May 2013 - 05:43 PM

Go Koobie, I'm giving you a cheer of encouragement (I've just returned from watching a Cheer competition so I'm shaking pom-poms biggrin.gif ).
I'm glad you felt better after reading the replies prior to your post.

Off thread but responding to some posts about babies dying  sad.gif  .
It is unfortunately true that babies have died from a lack of breastmilk and from formula itself.
This is a problem that doesn't usually affect us here in our lucky country.
If you want to find out more about infant mortality (death) and morbidity (illness) then the WHO website is the place to go.
Bfing ("if you can") has recently been added as the 6th recommendation in preventing SIDS along with sleeping on the back, head uncovered etc.

#54 Maggueful

Posted 11 May 2013 - 05:58 PM

QUOTE (Jenflea @ 11/05/2013, 02:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
i don't want this to turn into a breast versus formula bunfight, but the baby DOESN'T get everything they need from formula.

So you think you know more than a pediatrician? I think I would be more likely to go with an educated, experienced professional for their experienced opinion.

QUOTE (knottygirl @ 11/05/2013, 03:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
to me, all the people saying they forumla fed and their kids turned out fine are lucky.  Its been proven that there are numerous babys die each year who wouldnt have died had they been breastfed.


Some real life Western Society examples of this please? You can't just say something so ignorant and not give some examples.

Edited by Maggueful, 11 May 2013 - 05:58 PM.


#55 Froger

Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:17 PM

Hi OP. It seems your main concern is breastfeeding in public? This does take a little getting used to. It is something that IME gets a lot easier with practice.


QUOTE (Maggueful @ 11/05/2013, 05:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Some real life Western Society examples of this please? You can't just say something so ignorant and not give some examples.


While I don't want to get into an arguement, this is the breastfeeding support section, and surely we are allowed to discuss stuff here about breastfeeding without people coming in and trying disrupt the forum? If you are upset by discussions about breastfeeding, perhaps stay out of the breastfeeding forum, intstead of coming in and trying to shout other people down. Because the truth is that formula feeding, even in a developed country, does carry some amount of risk. That is the simple truth of the matter. I mean, for instance, breastfeeding is now the sixth recommendation for reducingt the risk of SIDS. This is in Australia, a developed country. http://www.sidsandkids.org/safe-sleeping/


Anyway, here is a study, from the USA which outlines the increased risk of death from formula feeding in the USA. It suggests that in the USA around 700 deaths of babies could be prevented each year by breastfeeding.

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cont...5.full.pdf+html

Here is another one which outlines some of the risks of not breastfeeding in developed countries. This includes deaths from necrotising enterocolitis and higher risk of SIDS, diabetes etc. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2812877/

Edited by SarahM72, 11 May 2013 - 06:19 PM.


#56 F.E.B.E

Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:29 PM

Congratulations on making it through the first week!

In the early days, wearing the 'right' clothes to breastfeed can make all the difference, as well as discovering cafes etc which are more breastfeeding friendly  - e.g have comfortable couches in quiet areas.

In cooler temps I'd wear a breastfeeding singlet + cardigan + lightweight scarf with pants or a skirt. That would cover everything I wanted covered and provide easy access.

In a month or two you'll find that bub has settled in to somewhat of a predictable routine and you'll be able to leave them with your partner and duck up to the shops or whatever before the next feed.

Unfortunately I found formula inconvenient as well (I have done both). You have to remember to pack enough bottles, formula and water for how long you're going to be out, find somewhere to warm it etc. Making up bottles in the middle of a winter's night is also unfun.

There are pros and cons, and as it does seem like you and bub are doing well it's worth taking it day by day and re-evaluating as you go.

Be easy on yourself and don't expect to get too much done in a day. At this stage your main job is to just feed, feed and feed.

#57 Pooks Combusted

Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:30 PM

The interesting thing about this thread is that OP came back, thanked everyone for their support and is going to continue persevering to breastfeed. Even without being told formula was gonna kill her baby. It's remarkable how balanced, caring advice worked.

But carry on. I'm off to poison my kid again.

#58 Froger

Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:40 PM

QUOTE (Pooks*potters @ 11/05/2013, 06:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The interesting thing about this thread is that OP came back, thanked everyone for their support and is going to continue persevering to breastfeed. Even without being told formula was gonna kill her baby. It's remarkable how balanced, caring advice worked.

But carry on. I'm off to poison my kid again.


Look, that was my first post in this thread. I was only replying to the PP who came in here and specifically demanded evidence. This is not the "What do you think section". This is the breastfeeding section. Is it really necessary for people who seem to be against breastfeeding to come in and start carrying on? And if people don't want "real life Western examples" then don't come in and ask for them.

#59 Maggueful

Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:54 PM

QUOTE (SarahM72 @ 11/05/2013, 06:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Look, that was my first post in this thread. I was only replying to the PP who came in here and specifically demanded evidence. This is not the "What do you think section". This is the breastfeeding section. Is it really necessary for people who seem to be against breastfeeding to come in and start carrying on? And if people don't want "real life Western examples" then don't come in and ask for them.


I didn't say anything about being against breastfeeding. It is the best food for the baby and I BF my babies for as long as I wanted to but there are also a lot of options out there in our society that can help either to continue with BFing or to try other options. The main thing is that the baby is fed is given the best start in life.

And I asked knottygirl for examples not SarahM72. Those examples do not prove that formula kills babies.

Good luck OP. I hope it all goes well. It's always difficult for the first few weeks until you get into a routine. Do what is right for you.

Edited by Maggueful, 11 May 2013 - 07:01 PM.


#60 knottygirl

Posted 11 May 2013 - 08:11 PM

They die from diseases ect that they wouldnt have died from if they were breastfed.  It was based on a big study in america.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/h...0217-2ela0.html

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-f...90403-9mlh.html

http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap...+No+local+token
QUOTE
This recommendation is supported by the health outcomes of exclusively breastfed infants and infants who never or only partially breastfed. Breastfeeding provides a protective effect against respiratory illnesses, ear infections, gastrointestinal diseases, and allergies including asthma, eczema and atopic dermatitis. The rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is reduced by over a third in breastfed babies, and there is a 15 percent to 30 percent reduction in adolescent and adult obesity in breastfed vs. non-breastfed infants. Approximately 75 percent of newborn infants initiate breastfeeding. Hospital routines more and more attempt to accommodate the breastfeeding mother. Pediatricians promote the advantages of breastfeeding to mothers and infants, as well as the health risks of not breastfeeding. As such, choosing to breastfeed should be considered an investment in the short- and long-term health of the infant, rather than a lifestyle choice.


#61 knottygirl

Posted 11 May 2013 - 08:13 PM

I think a 1/3 reduction in the rate of SIDS is enough to convince me, let alone everything else.



#62 asignatureofthings

Posted 11 May 2013 - 08:35 PM

Hang in there OP, it does get easier. Good luck!

#63 Jenflea

Posted 11 May 2013 - 09:26 PM

PP, the reason formula does NOT provide everything breast milk does, is because it does not increase a baby's resistance to disease and illness, it does not contain any of the mother's antibodies, it does not lessen the chance of allergies and food intolerances.
Breast milk DOES.

Breast feeding lowers the mother's risk of cancer.
it also helps your uterus to return to normal after  the birth.

Breast fed babies have been found to have a higher IQ. I think by about 5 pts from what I remember from when I was pregnant.

Breast fed babies have a reduced risk of SIDS as mentioned above.


So no, formula does not provide the same things as breast milk.


#64 Moulla

Posted 11 May 2013 - 09:44 PM

Breast is best... If you can BF then rejoice in this and the multiple advantages you will provide for your little one, emotionally, physically and mentally.

#65 B0612

Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:36 PM

The main thing that matters op is your child. If you have a happy and contented baby with breastfeeding and breastmilk then try and persevere as long as you can. If it gets to a point where it is too much for you then maybe look at other options such as pumping to give you a break and your partner can feed your dd. The way you feed your child does not make you a better mother, what makes you a good mother is ensuring all your child's needs are met and you surround your child in a living and nurturing environment.



#66 Duck-o-lah

Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:44 PM

No one is trying to disrupt the forum, just because the forum is dedicated to BFing it doesn't mean people should be allowed to come in and say 'you are lucky if you feed your baby formula and it doesn't die.' I don't give a rats if you can support that with evidence, it's a horrid thing to say. Those of us who have FFed our babies may feel bad enough about it without being spoken to like that.

There are many ways of explaining the benefits of BFing without being insensitive.
QUOTE
The interesting thing about this thread is that OP came back, thanked everyone for their support and is going to continue persevering to breastfeed. Even without being told formula was gonna kill her baby. It's remarkable how balanced, caring advice worked.
Exactly.

#67 6plus2

Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:44 PM

Stick with it as they start to feed a lot more quickly once their sucking reflex Really kicks in. It is very early days.

Formula feeding is just as time poor because you have to sterlise, boil, cool the water, wash all the bottles and make up gizillions of bottles.

It will be much easier to stick with feeding and less expensive. Formula is very pricey and you may find you will have to try A few brands to find one the hub will take



#68 Soontobegran

Posted 11 May 2013 - 11:22 PM


Glad to see you are going to stick to it Koobie, it really does improve in every single way over the first few weeks.
I hated BF my first for the first few weeks but by about 6 weeks everything slotted into place. Try and enlist some support and help from those who will encourage you without judgement.
Keep up the good work. original.gif






QUOTE (*mylittleprince* @ 10/05/2013, 08:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm going to go against the grain and give you some tough love.

Seriously... suck it up. Early days and you are considering giving it up because you don't like to feed in public and want some time to yourself. Motherhood is demanding. They only feed often for the first few months and then it stretches out. Get a breastfeeding cover and/or wear a b/f singlet under a normal top and/or feed in the car, at home, whatever.

I'm exclusively feeding twins on demand plus have an older child and no help as my family live overseas.

If you were having major issues I would say consider introducing formula but there is no reason to in your case.

If latching is a problem you can stay home for a few days/weeks (or only go to places you feel comfortable) while you master the art of b/f.

Good luck


You win the empathy award for the day! sad.gif


QUOTE (knottygirl @ 11/05/2013, 03:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
to me, all the people saying they forumla fed and their kids turned out fine are lucky.  Its been proven that there are numerous babys die each year who wouldnt have died had they been breastfed.

I think its like saying, 'well i drove to the shops with no seatbelt on and i got there ok' yes, you may have but thats not to say that if there was an accident you would have been worse off than if you had a seat belt on.

I wouldnt switch to formula for a week old, just stick with it.

I get that alot of people stop breastfeeding for valid reasons.  But ive also heard lots of invalid reasons.  Like a woman i know who tried every type of bottle on the market, every day, trying to force her son onto a bottle when he didnt want it.  Finally, he took one.  she had no problems with attaching or supply or anything.   Within a couple weeks he was on formula only, and she could go back to having a couple of drinks each night and going out and stuff.  

I also know people who stopped feeding at 6 months cause they wanted to get pregnant again.  To me thats not a valid reason to stop a child breastfeeding.


knottygirl... not really where to start with this charming contribution other than to say that the only breast feeding attempt you should be judging is your own. I am struggling with the concept that you think it is okay to  judge as to what is a 'valid  reason' for giving up breast feeding.
I hope that you have not appointed yourself the go to girl for breast feeding women...they'd clearly find it hard to meet up to your ideals.

We live in Australia, breast feeding is the best form of feeding for most babies but you know what? Formula will more than suffice for many others and I'd love some stats on the number of Australian babies who hade died but wouldn't have if they had been breast fed.

FTR--I have trained as a LC, have extended and tandem fed my children but I have never lost my ability to understand that what was easy for me is not always the case for others.
Shaming and scaremongering a mother into breastfeeding is NOT the way to encourage BF rates.




#69 B0612

Posted 11 May 2013 - 11:26 PM

The main thing that matters op is your child. If you have a happy and contented baby with breastfeeding and breastmilk then try and persevere as long as you can. If it gets to a point where it is too much for you then maybe look at other options such as pumping to give you a break and your partner can feed your dd. The way you feed your child does not make you a better mother, what makes you a good mother is ensuring all your child's needs are met and you surround your child in a living and nurturing environment.



#70 Sassenach2

Posted 12 May 2013 - 11:26 AM

QUOTE (deedee15 @ 10/05/2013, 06:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Are you able to express, to give your DH a chance to do the feeds too, and give yourself some time??


If you really want to make breastfeeding work, don't introduce bottles at an early age, in fact IMO no bottles ever. They have a different suction to breastfeeding and the baby needs to suckle the breast to get the most milk out. They can get nipple confusion and may not go back to breastfeeding and then you are committed to bottles - which are a pain to look after and carry around with you and get them heated.

Try and hang in there for your own health and your baby's well being and I always let my mums know, that breastfeeding babies for a cumulative time of 2 years (one baby or more than one) gives you a lower risk of contracting breast cancer at a late age. Oncologists ask that question when they see women with breast cancer.

Could you contact your local ABA group and go along to their meetings and talk to like-minded women who will be able to help you with advice and friendship.

Edited by Winterdanceparty, 12 May 2013 - 11:30 AM.


#71 Kay1

Posted 12 May 2013 - 11:34 AM

I would also say hang in there, at least until 6 weeks. It get SO much easier. And BFing at night is way easier than getting up in the dark and cold to make bottles, then there's all the washing etc. It might feel like FF will make everything much easier but tbh I don't think that's true.

I know its confronting BFing in public but honestly it gets easier. You realise that no one is remotely interested in you, except maybe other mums who can relate. It IS the best thing for your baby and it IS working well. Its just a difficult stage and you can get through it.

I am by no means anti FF but I loved being able to dash out of the house with nothing for my babies except nappies. I knew I always had milk on hand for them and never got caught short. Once that first, hard bit settles down it is easy. Good luck.

#72 I'mBeachedAs

Posted 12 May 2013 - 07:10 PM

https://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bfinfo/cup-feeding

Bottle feeding your baby EBM is not the only option. Look at this link for another option.




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