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Rugby league and kids


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Poll: Rugby league and kids (126 member(s) have cast votes)

Would you let your kids play rugby league?

  1. Yes (44 votes [34.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 34.92%

  2. No (82 votes [65.08%])

    Percentage of vote: 65.08%

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#1 F.E.B.E

Posted 06 June 2013 - 06:36 PM

We're interested in doing a story on rugby league and kids after the State of Origin.

In addition to the above poll, what are your thoughts on the on-field rugby league fights? all part of the entertainment or a very bad example? And how old is old enough for contact sports?

#2 Hedgoth

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:17 PM

QUOTE
I voted no as I think rugby union is a better game and has less of the feral ness that league has associated with it.


You must be watching different rugby union to me then.

There is fighting like this in most contact sports. I don't believe one is worse than the other and am not sure why league has been singled out.

Next someone will be coming in saying cricket players never behave in a manner thats rude/disgusting/offensive.



#3 vanessa71

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:19 PM

I can't stand rugby, league or union.


#4 Guest_JaneDoe2010_*

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:22 PM

I will strongly discourage my children from playing any football codes. I loathe the football culture and, of course, the physical risks.

#5 Justaduck

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:23 PM

I think the actions of Paul Gallen were disgusting coming from a captain of a team. It sends a bad message to kids playing at local club level.

There is so much media attention to the One Punch Can Kill campaign (set up by a father of a boy in our local area who was killed from being punched) yet he can do this and just miss one game (and not a representative game) and play again.


#6 StopTheGoats

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:30 PM

Tennis or soccer here. He's built like an AFL player but the culture of thuggery & misogyny in league, union and AFL aren't for me.

#7 DEVOCEAN

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:42 PM

My 19 & 14yr old DD's have both played it at high school. They won't play it outside school because their first love(soccer) comes first, but at school they did/do everything they can except swimming.

#8 DEVOCEAN

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:46 PM

QUOTE (Canberra chick @ 06/06/2013, 07:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So mountaineering and skiing are out too?  rolleyes.gif  might as well wrap kids in cotton wool f we don't want physical risks.
By the way, netball and soccer are really, really bad for knees. All sport has physical risks.

Hell yes. There are so many players every season who do their ACL and a few who need total knee replacements. It is also hell on the ankles(DD14 has to use a balance board for strengthening hers) and on the hips.
One of DD14's mates has a sister who has played netball since she was little, and has had both ankles done and needs hip surgery. She is 17.

#9 AliasMater

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:47 PM

No, mine wont be involved in any of the football codes. Not now, not ever for the same reasons previously listed; a culture of thuggery, misogyny, homophobia, racism, drugs & alcohol and so on.


#10 JustBeige

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:51 PM

DS plays.  Its not the sport I would have chosen for him as I absolutely loath the god complex that a lot of our sports people develop and in particular the NRL players.

However, I am impressed at the message being taught to the *majority of the younger players.  They are taught age appropriate tackles and forms of defense and strongly encouraged to wear protective gear.


*I say majority, because unfortunately there are still the parents/coaches/clubs that do encourage the elitist mentality (whether its deserved or not) and thuggery is also encouraged.

If the NRL truly wants to clean up its act then actions like the one from Paul Gallen should not be tolerated and the harshest penalties should apply - being banned from playing.  full stop. no negotiation.

and the junior clubs should be made to enforce these rules too.

Edited by JustBeige, 06 June 2013 - 07:52 PM.


#11 Guest_JaneDoe2010_*

Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:53 PM

QUOTE (Canberra chick @ 06/06/2013, 07:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So mountaineering and skiing are out too?  rolleyes.gif  might as well wrap kids in cotton wool f we don't want physical risks.
By the way, netball and soccer are really, really bad for knees. All sport has physical risks.


I was talking about the physical risks of football (all codes). My apologies if I didn't make that clear enough.

All sports have physical risks of course but when you combine the footy culture (again, all codes) with the high physical contact game of football that's too much for my liking.

#12 Cat Burglar

Posted 06 June 2013 - 08:49 PM

QUOTE (Bek+3 @ 06/06/2013, 07:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
No, mine wont be involved in any of the football codes. Not now, not ever for the same reasons previously listed; a culture of thuggery, misogyny, homophobia, racism, drugs & alcohol and so on.



I used to play soccer as you might have guessed, its very popular among the gay and lesbian community  in my town  wink.gif

#13 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 06 June 2013 - 08:54 PM

My son plays union, they tag at the moment but will tackle next year (he will be seven) - he may well go to a school that plays league, in which case if he wanted to play, then he'll play. I guess I do understand the opinion that union is the "nicer" of the two, although at an amateur level league is better to watch (I think, just my opinion) ...either way, he hasn't got the build for a forward- for which I am thankful!


#14 DEVOCEAN

Posted 06 June 2013 - 08:54 PM

QUOTE (Soccer Mum @ 06/06/2013, 08:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I used to play soccer as you might have guessed, its very popular among the gay and lesbian community  in my town  wink.gif

LOL, funny you say that. DD19's club had quite a few lesbians in the senior squads. Some would be surprised at the makeup of the W-League and Matildas.

#15 ~river song~

Posted 06 June 2013 - 08:55 PM

QUOTE (Bek+3 @ 06/06/2013, 07:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
No, mine wont be involved in any of the football codes. Not now, not ever for the same reasons previously listed; a culture of thuggery, misogyny, homophobia, racism, drugs & alcohol and so on.


+1 - when looking for schools for my DS one thing I'm looking at is sport offered, if RL is the main sport then its not the school for us.
Thankfully DH isn't a big sport fan either.

#16 Chelli

Posted 06 June 2013 - 08:59 PM

I selected no as my girls would not be into that, and Tasmania is sooo not a rugby state. Soccer has really taken off down here though, for both boys and girls.

#17 doubting thomas

Posted 06 June 2013 - 08:59 PM

I didn't vote because 1 of my boys has played but I wouldn't let them now. My main reason is not the behaviour of senior players , although that is not great at times; it is  the huge disparity in size between players at the junior levels. At under 13's you can have a good foot in height and 15 kgs difference between players easily. It is not fun for anyone and terrifying  for the parents of the smaller players.



#18 Guest_JaneDoe2010_*

Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:02 PM

QUOTE (Canberra chick @ 06/06/2013, 08:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Like I said, mountaineers, skiers, even mountain bikers can be highly macho thrill seekers who take unnecessary risks. It's not restricted to football codes.


And like I said, I was combining the culture AND the physical risks in my assessment.

QUOTE (Bek+3 @ 06/06/2013, 07:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
No, mine wont be involved in any of the football codes. Not now, not ever for the same reasons previously listed; a culture of thuggery, misogyny, homophobia, racism, drugs & alcohol and so on.


+1 more

#19 runnybabbit

Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:06 PM

QUOTE (Canberra chick @ 06/06/2013, 06:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As for what Paul Gallen did. He's a thug and if he did it off the field he'd be in a police cell. If you want to settle a score on the field, you put your opponent flat on their a*se in a hard but legal tackle. That's entertaining and clean. Paul Gallen is neither.


This. We live in NQld, so even if my boys (I have two) don't play rugby and don't watch it (fat chance), which may or may not happen, some of their peers certainly will. Normalising thuggish behaviour like that increases the chances of non-violent non-thugs getting king hit or suffering violence in general, to say nothing of encouraging violence in people with thuggish inclinations.

#20 fiveforme

Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:14 PM

3 of my boys are playing, but we don't like it and hope they will get sick of it soon. It is the thing to do in our town so our kids play for the social aspect, the eldest is 11 and is on the wing so hardly touches the ball.

I really hate the culture and how rugby league players get away with stuff that others can't.

#21 threeinnyc

Posted 07 June 2013 - 03:29 AM

No for me. It's too rough. We are delicate people lol.
DS plays normal sport like swimming, tae kwon do.

#22 gc_melody

Posted 07 June 2013 - 07:26 AM

I feel like a hypocrite. I like watching the game, I grew up with it and like the tactical and skill contest.

What I don't like is a lot of the culture that goes along with it as some pp's have talked about. The other issue for me is the high risk of closed head injuries (risky tackles and certainly the punching on that happens) and I can't see myself ever allowing my son to play the game. With the research that is coming out of America with repeated concussions and brain injuries and early onset dementia, I think all football codes here need to sit up and take notice and start looking at how to make the game safer and more family friendly.

#23 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 07 June 2013 - 07:35 AM

I won't disallow it but I hope he isn't in to sports.

I will support him within reason. DH and I aren't sporty at all and no nothing about sports. I'm hoping DS ends up more musical and creative than sporty.

#24 hm6

Posted 07 June 2013 - 07:52 AM

Physical risk and poor on field behaviour are 2 different things. All sport has some phsical risk as PP have pointed out - ACL , ankle injuries are common for say netball. If you are talking about roles models at a high level then I've yet to see "punches thrown" between the Swifts and the Firebirds. Having said that games at a lower level can be brutal. I have a friend who won't let her son play RL & prefers AFL because its " safer" except that at 17 he's already been involved in punch ups on the field and had numerous injuries as well. I voted 'no ' but mainly because where I live the footy culture is ugly & I wouldn't have wanted to be involved in that. Don't mind the game tho.

#25 Zesty

Posted 07 June 2013 - 07:52 AM

My 10yo plays. It's something that he has wanted to do for a few years and when we moved to an area that had rugby league, we signed him up.

I don't think they should show any on field fighting and I do not think it sets any kind of good example. Having said that, there are many sports that have elite players doing things that are not things I want my children admiring... drugs, cheating etc.

I get that it can become a culture, however I don't think you can necessarily compare junior sporting levels to senior sporting levels. I also believe at a club level the safety of the junior players is always a priority.

I think it's part of our job, as parents, to have frank and open discussions with our children about why this behaviour is not acceptable.




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