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FYOS 2014 thread number 2


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#126 karkat

Posted 19 February 2014 - 12:40 PM

Mayahlb - we haven't got readers yet but on our homework sheet one option to chose was "parents read a book to child and discuss, title page, spine of the book, capital letter and full stop etc" at the info night we were encouraged to when we read to our kids get them to point out words they know (if at that level) or letters they know and what sound the letter makes (again if at that level of reading).

So definitely not a case of the child reading to us and apparently when the school finally gets the new readers processed (in another few weeks) we will still be encouraged to talk about the book and only have the child read to us if they are able. DD has a couple of kids in her class who've never been exposed to books so the teachers bring it right back to basics for everyone, DD who has always had lots of books didn't know about title pages, spine, front/back cover etc because we just never spoke about it.

DD is still loving school, she got student of the week last week, she didn't tell me, one of the other mum's did and apparently DD got straight up in front of the whole school, no worries! So proud. She's come so far from being the little kid that would run away screaming at the park if another kid came within 5m of her.

#127 Gumbette

Posted 20 February 2014 - 08:22 AM

Forget losing stuff.  The school actually lost DD.  She wandered into the upper primary section and because she's so tall, she didn't appear out of place.  No one noticed until they were going into class as she just hopped into a Yr 3 line.  They've now distributed her photo to the upper primary teachers with the instruction to send her back should she decide to join their roll call in the morning.

#128 mayahlb

Posted 20 February 2014 - 03:01 PM

Tirebuthappy - sorry I had to laugh at that. your DD sounds like a curious little girl.

DS's teacher told me today that he was really chuffed yesterday because he showed the other kids how to sort the A's into capitals and little a's on Starfall. He then came home and asked to get on the computer so he could show his brother. Was so cute, him sharing something he knew. And it was nice to see that he remembered something from Starfall from early last year.

#129 lynneyours

Posted 20 February 2014 - 09:33 PM

We're getting 3 readers a night here.  2 at their level and one the next level up.  So I get DD to read the words to me and point to them as she goes and when we get to a word she doesn't know, she tries to sound it out.  And tries to figure it out from the picture. She is so chuffed and proud when she figures it out. She reads the book with me, then reads it herself, then reads it to DD2 as a bedtime story - so cute.

And we have the 12 Golden words to learn for the whole class. She knows them and is so proud and can't wait for the red letters.

We've just done the Prep testing, so now they get split into ability groups for reading and maths.  
eg: DD is very good at letters, language, what sound each letter makes etc so she can try to sound words out.  Others in the class cannot read all letters yet, so they will not be reading the readers themselves, but being read to, letter recognition etc. There is a very wide ability range, and it is a very diverse school, so some children are still learning English or have parents who cannot speak/read English, which no doubt makes it a little harder for them with readers at home.

DD2 is nowhere near what DD1 could do language wise at the same stage last year, so when she starts Prep in a year, I doubt she'll be able to read the books to me.

#130 Gumbette

Posted 20 February 2014 - 09:38 PM

3 readers a night?!? Wow.  We get one new one each night.

#131 lynneyours

Posted 20 February 2014 - 10:16 PM

Yeah, they don't HAVE to read them all each night, but if they do, they are changed over.  

If they only read 1, then only that one is changed.  Just DD1 loves school, reading, learning etc.  Long may it continue!

This is the kid who at 4 asked me who made the world, how they made it, what it was made of, where did that stuff to make it come from?  Also got what happens to us when we die?

At 3 we got:  if Santa comes to all the kids, why do we need to buy Xmas presents for other kids?  Why doesn't Santa bring them presents?

#132 Gumbette

Posted 21 February 2014 - 05:31 AM

View Postlynnemine, on 20 February 2014 - 10:16 PM, said:

This is the kid who at 4 asked me who made the world, how they made it, what it was made of, where did that stuff to make it come from?  Also got what happens to us when we die?

At 3 we got:  if Santa comes to all the kids, why do we need to buy Xmas presents for other kids?  Why doesn't Santa bring them presents?

That is one smart little cookie you have there!

#133 newphase

Posted 21 February 2014 - 04:14 PM

Tiredbut happy--- you win the loss comp! Yikes! My DD was tall as a Prep-2 kids, one girl in her class though towered over all kids, tallest boy and all and built like a brick dunny, she would have passed for a grade 3-4 kid easily. But it is interesting she lined up there though. What did she say about that?

3 - 4 readers here a night too, drives me batty as DS is off with the fairies. They change one book everyother day, 2 new ones for weekends, I think it is for confidence having the same reader for a few days so they can feel like they are accomplishing something, perhaps for the not yet so great readers like my boy. Seeing teacher Monday 1.10pm, will ask about it all as really i am clueless.


Lynniemine----its great to have a curious little one. Your DD sounds really switched on.

DS is getting better at going to school, no tears now, though still the odd...I don't want to go.

#134 Avidreader

Posted 22 February 2014 - 10:19 AM

My DS appears to be loving school. He started school reading so they put him straight onto level 12 readers. He is quite proud of how he has his own box while all the other kids share a box.

It is huge class- 34 kids! They have a full-time aide so that is helping. He is also making friends. We had his birthday party last weekend and it was almost as important for me as it was for him! It was great to be able to narrow down the mums and dads of boys in Ollie's class and get a chance to get to know them. The more allies you can have amongst the parents the better I think!

I have a meeting on Tuesday with his teacher to discuss how they are going to approach his reading and also his speech issues (bit of a stutterer).

My DD is in year 1 and she also started school reading and with her it has now hit crunch time where they are getting her IQ tested, she is being grade accelerated for literacy in preparation for a possible grade skip (which I am not that happy with!). In some ways I hope the fact that Ollie is the youngest in his class will mean he has more chance of staying with his peers (when DD was in Kindy she had to go to year 1 to get someone to read with).

#135 cristina86

Posted 22 February 2014 - 10:40 AM

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Edited by cristina86, 07 February 2015 - 03:34 PM.


#136 princessanarchy

Posted 22 February 2014 - 10:05 PM

Jodownunder I'm in a similar situation with our little one, though a bit same as CallmeProtart too. I am trying really hard to be useful to DD, who is naturally shyer than me, but I end up feeling like I'm reliving the playground again. And I am a bit, it feels like my FYOS with the new school, school parents etc. Does everyone else feel nervous in that meeting people on the playground/committees etc? They must. That's what I tell DD at least ;)

#137 cira

Posted 22 February 2014 - 10:16 PM

Been following this thread...my DD fas started her FYOS and is coping very well. She loves going and seems to have plenty of stamina.

Princess Anarchy -I am fairly shy and definitely get nervous meeting all the new parents. My DD is far more outgoing than me and I try my best to fake confidence as I want her to be socially confident and not pick up shy-cues from me.

There are 20 kids in my DD's prep class in Vic.

#138 newphase

Posted 23 February 2014 - 11:57 AM

34 kids even with an aide is huge. Only schools I know with 30+ are the Catholic schools. It reminds me of my Mums day, not even my day, with 35-40 kids in a class. I couldn't imagine keeping wraps on them all properly as a teacher.

19 in DS's class, 21 in the other 2 Prep classes. Tis the reason we travel 25 mins to school. Even the school around the corner has max 26 Prep-2. 28 max the rest of classes.

#139 Charmzy

Posted 24 February 2014 - 10:34 AM

Think this is my first time posting in here, how has the new week started for everyone? Are they still happy to go to school?  

My DD asks to go on the weekend and now has her 2 yr old sister desperate for school too. Sorry almost 3years to go still!!

We have 22 in our class which is high compared to previous years they have had 19-20 but the school is growing so fast.

View PostAvidreader, on 22 February 2014 - 10:19 AM, said:

My DD is in year 1 and she also started school reading and with her it has now hit crunch time where they are getting her IQ tested, she is being grade accelerated for literacy in preparation for a possible grade skip (which I am not that happy with!). In some ways I hope the fact that Ollie is the youngest in his class will mean he has more chance of staying with his peers (when DD was in Kindy she had to go to year 1 to get someone to read with).

Tash is the youngest in her class too, she had IQ testing done and was allowed to start school a year early. She fits in well, I'd say she's still in the top 25% of the class with her reading /writing abilities etc and was definitely ready to start this year not wait another year. Does your school cope well with accelerating? We changed schools a few years ago because the first school my kids started at were not good at extending them, they would say for example: I tested your child at a year 7 level (in grade 3) but I'm only extending them to a grade 4 level as its too much work.     The school they are at now is much better but still has its limits.  I find a lot of their extension is work that's sent home for me to do with them which I don't mind doing but when there's so many with so much homework in the first place, suddenly having 2-3 ILP's on top of that gets out of control!

#140 Gumbette

Posted 24 February 2014 - 10:44 AM

View Postnewphase, on 21 February 2014 - 04:14 PM, said:

Tiredbut happy--- you win the loss comp! Yikes! My DD was tall as a Prep-2 kids, one girl in her class though towered over all kids, tallest boy and all and built like a brick dunny, she would have passed for a grade 3-4 kid easily. But it is interesting she lined up there though. What did she say about that?

Well she didn't actually tell us.  Her teacher told DH when he had an IEP meeting with them.

DD is quite happy to conform and just do whatever everyone else is doing - she would have just hopped into the nearest line when everyone else starting lining up.  Apparently a lot of kindy kids do it in the first couple of weeks, they wander into the upper primary area out of curiosity - main difference is that the teachers can usually spot them a mile off and send them back, obviously not so with DD!

#141 mayahlb

Posted 24 February 2014 - 04:20 PM

Well we have a our first day off sick. Got a call an hour before school finishes saying Tristan was unwell and has actually fallen asleep on the little couch they have. Poor kiddo. At least his dad was home already so could go pick him up (I can't take monday or Tuesday off. Its just not possible with the staff arrangement at work).

34 kids with an aide is a huge class. Our school has a cap of 28 with a strong preference of 25 max. And that is with a teacher and full time aide. T's class has 24, a teacher (well 2 actually, Friday he has a different teacher), full time aide and another aide who comes 4 days a week. I know the extra aide is partially funded by Tristan, as he qualified for a tiny amount of funding for extra aide time, which went to the school as a whole. It's one thing I actually really like about this school, they make sure that there is an full-time aide in every classroom under grade 2 and the higher grades have at least a part-time aide. Where the funding comes from I have no idea (public school) but it is a school that comes under a scheme where they are in control of their funding and responsible for it (called something specific, I know they are trialling it in QLD at the moment).

Charmzy - glad that the school seems to be trying to work for your kids needs. It must be hard when they are not even though they are supposed to under the dept education regulations.

meeting parents - I am fairly shy. it's hard too as I am just about in and out in the mornings because I have to leave for work, so don't really get a chance to chat or talk with the other parents. Most don't arrive until the classroom opens (I get there early, otherwise the chances of a park is nil) and I am gone 5 mins later. I also don't do the school pick up, except occasionally Friday. Oh well, I know some from Kindy last year and from the daycare drop off and pickup.

#142 lynneyours

Posted 24 February 2014 - 04:52 PM

View PostAvidreader, on 22 February 2014 - 10:19 AM, said:

It is huge class- 34 kids! They have a full-time aide so that is helping.


That is massive!  Why don't they just split it into 2 classes of 17?  All our Prep classes are 20, which is a nice number.

DD still loving school, especially literacy and art.  <3

I don't know any Mums either, but I have volunteered for a few things, and introduced myself to a few Mums whose children DD plays with.  ie "Hi, are you x's Mum?  I'm DD1's mum, she talks about x alot".   Or you could just ask "how is your little one going?" - the conversation can go from there.

#143 mayahlb

Posted 25 February 2014 - 10:48 AM

View Postlynneyours, on 24 February 2014 - 04:52 PM, said:

That is massive!  Why don't they just split it into 2 classes of 17?  All our Prep classes are 20, which is a nice number.

Depends on funding, teacher numbers etc. Some schools are problematic with funding, depending on the states, the Dept. of Education can be very strict about how much funding and numbers for classes etc. It can also depend on the type of school. We looked into putting T into our local Catholic school because it has a specialised early learning centre but their class sizes in the early years of primary school put me off (he might still end up there, we are in a wait and see with his current school at the moment to see if it meets his needs). But they are a low fee private school and their funding structure means they have larger classes (their high school classes are tiny though). Our current school will also have a restructure sometime at the end of this year/start of next year because the zones are changing as a new public school opens up next year. Year 7 is also moving out of primary school in WA (and I believe QLD) at the end of this year. Some places also have a shortage of good fully qualified teachers. (half the teachers aides at our school are actually fully qualified teachers but they prefer being teachers aides because it means so much less in terms or workload and paperwork.) This will also affect class numbers and size, funding and teacher numbers. So it could be all of those or it could be none.

#144 Avidreader

Posted 25 February 2014 - 07:38 PM

It is a Catholic school with very reasonable fees. It achieves better results than the local public school despite the large class sizes. It comes down to funding but they assured us at every info night that studies show that the larger sizes don't affect student outcomes- the largest impact is on the poor teacher!

We had DS's interview today. Teacher confirmed that he is the only child reading at his level and there is no one close to his level. So again we are in the world of my kids being in a group of one! The teacher said she doesn't want him to go to year 1( I should hope not he has only just turned 5 and been at school a whole 5 weeks!) but she will read with him individually. Every other kid is a complete non reader so there is really no way to integrate him with the other kids.

Also received comments from other parents along the lines of " I deliberately didn't teach my kids to read before school". It is like when he started to read I should have locked up all the books in my house rather than encouraging him!

#145 mayahlb

Posted 26 February 2014 - 11:02 AM

Avidereader: seriously the other parents said that? I'd say it is jealously. I would have taught T to read, if he showed an interest. He loves going through all the books and everything in our house (and I am a bookworm and a librarian so there are a few.) He does actually recognise some words but that is a by product of his speech therapy (all his speech cards and homework have the written word as well as a picture) and I encouraged it because it made him happy. I assume that you encouraged your child to learn to read because it made them happy and they loved it. Reading should always be seen as something that is fun at this age. Hopefully working with the teacher will be enough and maybe later in the year they might see if they can extend him out of class. And I agree with the teacher making the biggest difference as to if a class thrives or not, I only wonder how some teachers go with the workload of bigger classes (I have friends who are teachers or have been teacher, it's amazing how many previous teachers seem to end up in the library profession)

#146 newphase

Posted 26 February 2014 - 11:20 AM

Quote

Also received comments from other parents along the lines of " I deliberately didn't teach my kids to read before school". It is like when he started to read I should have locked up all the books in my house rather than encouraging him!
Teaching them from scratch (like my DS's) is one thing, but if you have child asking all the time (like my DD at 4), or picking it up on their own that is another.

#147 cristina86

Posted 26 February 2014 - 12:46 PM

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Edited by cristina86, 07 February 2015 - 03:30 PM.


#148 Minichi

Posted 26 February 2014 - 06:09 PM

Avidreader - My DS has just started prep too and is very highly gifted.  He has strengths in all academic areas.  He's been put on reading level 24 although testing shows him reading at a grade 4 level with comprehension.  Obviously there is no other child in the class tha is anywhere near that level.  The next highest is level 5.  

Interestingly my DS has been put with the lower group (non readers) and as I am doing parent help, i get to see what is going on.

There are plenty of ways that he is using his reading strengths and learning eith other children.  I ran a reading group with a few children where my DS read them all the book and then they all made pictures of their favourite pages.  I helped each child write a sentence about what they had drawn.  For the non readers we practiced copying a sentence from the book, for my DS he did he own thoughts and worked on his letter formation (which is messy and not the best) at the end of this the group got up and showed the whole class what they had done.  My DS then proceeded to read extracts of the book to everyone.

I just wanted to give this as an example.  I find reading the easiest one to integrate a child far above the rest.

Maths is a lot harder which for DS is at a similar level.  ahe is working on completely different material as the rest of the children and is working somewhat independently.

Dont lose heart and make sure you know exactly where your child is because reading has lots of aspects in terms of comprehension, decoding, sounding out, writing, letter formation etc.  Ive found regardless of how my DS IQ is and how advanced his academics are there is still stuff to work on.

#149 mayahlb

Posted 05 March 2014 - 10:29 AM

How is everyone's child doing now we have roughly hit the halfway point of term 1? I am actually surprised that T has settled in so well. Well except for interruptions to his routine (the public holiday on Monday threw him out even though we had talked about it and we had lots of meltdown like behaviour). And he seems to be absorbing a lot. He read a sentence this morning completely unexpectedly from one of the home readers, and recognised most of the words in the follow one. Ok so it was only "you can eat it." but it is progress.

#150 Gumbette

Posted 05 March 2014 - 10:48 AM

She's starting to get tired by 7 pm now - NEVER thought I would see that - (ASD).

Still loves it and hates the thought of missing a day.

Lost tally - 2 pinnies, a hat, and library bag.




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