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My girls have started getting underarm hair..WDYD


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#1 Handsfull

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:20 PM

Hi EBers

My twin DDs (10.5 years) have started to get underarm hair and pubic hair so I know puberty is starting....OMG I am so not ready for this! :unsure:  

Question is the underarm hair which to me is starting to be more than blonde fuzz, there are a few dark hairs there.

I cannot remember when I first got underarm hair and what I did, ie started to shave it etc.  Is 11 years too young to shave or whatever?

If any of you have daughters similar age or BTDT please share.  

Thanks.

ETA: We live in Qld so its hot humid, they swim a lot and wear a lot of sleeveless tops in summer.

Edited by handsfull, 26 February 2014 - 03:21 PM.


#2 FeralSingleMum

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:25 PM

I started shaving just shy of my 13th birthday at my request. Living with my Dad and step mum, I approached them and asked if I could.

I don't have daughters but I would let them start shaving as soon as they came to me.

#3 taddie

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:26 PM

Shaving leaves nasty prickles in hot areas like underarms. I'd teach them to wax using the strips while they only have a few hairs and it doesn't hurt. By the time the hair builds up to hurting levels they'll be used to it :)

#4 mocha444

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:27 PM

I remember I started getting underarm hair at this age. My mum didn't give me the option of shaving soon enough and I remember being embarrassed wearing tank tops. I would give them the option ie provide them with the necessary equipment and do a demo or provide instruction and then leave it up to them if they want to shave or not.

#5 alwayshappy

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:27 PM

My almost 13 year old has a few hairs under her arms but doesn't appear too fussed by it.

I'm just going to play it by ear.  I don't want her to become paranoid about removing it if she's not ready for that long term commitment.  But, I'm also not going to sit and watch her grow an enormous muff (under her arms) that would cause sniggering behind her back! I would support her to remove the hair - wax or shave - but obviously, it would be her choice.

Edited by alwayshappy, 26 February 2014 - 03:28 PM.


#6 liveworkplay

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:30 PM

My 7 year old has started getting underarm hair (my 10 year old hasn't) Bar wearing deodorant everyday (she also has been having body odor issues on and off for over a year as well as pretty major mood swings) I wouldn't personally do anything. They are little girls with a few strands of hair that chances are, no one will notice. Personally I do not want to force society's expectations of grooming on my DD's at all.

#7 FloralArrangement

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:33 PM

I shaved under dd10's arms the first time only a few hairs, nothing much. She just informed me she shaves every once in a while, no dramas. The BO isn't as bad with the shaving.

#8 Tinky Winky Woo

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:36 PM

I wouldn't start the shaving thing yet.  But if it was an issue for them there are body trimmers which might be enough at this age.

I no longer use a razor of any kind - I do have a body trimmer though which works wonders and my hair is getting finer instead of been that awful prickly feeling awfulness.

Or get them waxed or elctrolised (if that's even the word for it).

#9 opethmum

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:45 PM

I would let them know about the options and let them decide when they wish to do it and that they are free to come and tell you at any time if they want the supplies to commence removal of their hair.

#10 Mrs Dinosaurus

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:51 PM

Please let them decide!

I was a similar age and Mum decided I should start shaving under my arms. I was SO not ready for that. Plus being a young developer everyone knew about the hair and were curious and so on - then I didn't have it any more and had to explain why! SO embarrassing.

Anyway - I am sure if she had left me to my own devices I would have got sick of the attention and asked myself to shave or wax.

Good luck - I don't think there is ever a good time for puberty when you're the parent!

#11 Guest_MissCinder_*

Posted 26 February 2014 - 03:55 PM

My mum used to leave her razor on the bath tub. I started shaving my legs when I was about 10 and nobody even noticed until a couple of years later that I'd been doing it. It's not rocket science. Underarm hair wasn't an issue for me until early high school but if it was I would have just shaved it also.

I'd just talk to your daughters generally about puberty, hair growth and their options for removal if they want to do that. Then I'd leave a few options like razors, wax and hair removal cream in easy to access locations and let them experiment at will to find what works for them. It's just hair and it will grow back :)

#12 Mpjp is feral

Posted 26 February 2014 - 04:01 PM

I let mine decide for themselves. You might find kids differ from us. My 12 yo's tribe if friends are bra-less, boy clothes wearing chicks horrified by the thought of removing body hair!! They all just let it hang out and fly free! Good on 'em.

#13 taddie

Posted 26 February 2014 - 04:21 PM

Hmm liveworkplay you might like to read up on early puberty. I went through it and it probably shaved a good inch off my final height, it's not implication free. I would have loved to be a few inches taller :)

http://www.webmd.com...causes-symptoms

http://www.webmd.com...symptoms?page=3

#14 Handsfull

Posted 26 February 2014 - 07:18 PM

Thank you for your responses.  I have yet to broach the subject but they know I shave my underarms.  

I don't know how they would take to waxing, as they hate anything touching their skin even bandaids.  But anything worth a go.  Leg hair is also thickened up, though blonde but I'm ok with that.  Its just the underarms that has me worried.....They already use Redken Pump Antiperspirant so I have the BO under control...a bit!

At the moment it is just me that has noticed but they are definitely "growing" more.  When they do swimming lessons with school it will def be more evident and I don't want them standing out anymore than they do, kids can be cruel.  DDs both have scars on their bodies from surgeries that others look at as it is.

I feel 10 is too young to shave, so mMaybe I will give the cream a go.  I will talk to them and see if they want to "experiment"..

Thanks for your thoughts much appreciated.  

Also LiveWorkPlay - as Taddie suggested you might want to look up precocious puberty - if your DD is starting to show signs at a young age I would follow it up.  7 years of age is a little young to be exhibiting signs not unheard of but slightly too early.

#15 Coffeegirl

Posted 26 February 2014 - 07:31 PM

DD is 13 and started getting darker hair under her arms around 11.   I left her alone until she asked me what she could do.

When we started discussing it, I discovered she'd borrowed my tweezers and plucked a few already, but it was too painful.  So we used a hair removal cream for the first few months when needed.  When she started shaving her legs, she included her underarms.

I use an epilator, but she found that a bit scary (it is noisy).

#16 greenthumbs

Posted 26 February 2014 - 07:33 PM

I don't mean this to sound rude, but are you perhaps projecting your own issues on this? Forgive me if that sounds mean (I only have a toddler DS so don't have to deal with any of this yet) but wouldn't it be best to wait until they bring it up?

I was an early developer who was so embarrassed by my body hair and would have loved to have a mum who would have listened and let me shave earlier (so it's great you're open to the idea) but I think if it was brought up that perhaps I should get rid of it in case others don't like it, I would have had a huge complex about it and become even more concerned about my appearance.

#17 dolcengabbana

Posted 26 February 2014 - 07:38 PM

My best friends DD12  was really uptight about her hair starting to grow a year ago and asked her mum to wax it off. They did a few test areas to see how she coped and reacted and now allows her mum to wax her legs and underarms, she even asked her mum to wax her bikini line as a few pubic hairs were visible at her bikini line in her one piece.

She doesn't get any discomfort from under arm or leg waxing but couldn't handle the bikini line. She choose to shave it off then came out and told my friend she decided to shave it ALL off. Which was fine with my friend and her DD feels pretty happy about it all and my friend lets her DD ask her to do it I.E doesn't bring it up or mention it lets her DD decide when she is ready to have it waxed etc,

#18 liveworkplay

Posted 26 February 2014 - 09:08 PM

 taddie, on 26 February 2014 - 04:21 PM, said:

Hmm liveworkplay you might like to read up on early puberty. I went through it and it probably shaved a good inch off my final height, it's not implication free. I would have loved to be a few inches taller Posted Image

http://www.webmd.com...causes-symptoms

http://www.webmd.com...symptoms?page=3

We are under the care of a GP and Paed. But thanks for your concern :)

Quote

7 years of age is a little young to be exhibiting signs not unheard of but slightly too early.

Unfortunately, they class 7 as the early side of normal these days :( Unless things are progressing rapidly, they don't do anything but watch and wait. Thankfully she has yet to develop breast buds, so things are not at the crucial point yet. At this rate the Paed suggests she will start menstruating at around 11. Way too young IMO :(  Luckily she is very tall for her age (over 140cm) but I would hate for her to be a "shorty" after towering over her peers since birth.

Edited by liveworkplay, 26 February 2014 - 09:13 PM.


#19 PooksLikeChristmas

Posted 26 February 2014 - 09:19 PM

I'd wait for her to ask. You could always mention it as an option, casually. I think this kind of thing varies so much between individual kids. Some will embarrassed if you raise it, others will be too embarrassed to raise it with you and wish you had done so. I think casually putting it out there in a value-free way would be best.

#20 taddie

Posted 26 February 2014 - 11:09 PM

 liveworkplay, on 26 February 2014 - 09:08 PM, said:

At this rate the Paed suggests she will start menstruating at around 11. Way too young IMO Posted Image  Luckily she is very tall for her age (over 140cm) but I would hate for her to be a "shorty" after towering over her peers since birth.

I was 11 and one of the tallest, I reached the grand height of 5'2" :) I think they don't do anything but may give growth hormones once the early growth spurt starts tapering off. That makes sure the child doesn't miss out on the height they should have been. It can also stave off things like having a short torso which can be a pain in the neck during pregnancy and might have contributed to my breech baby being unable to turn. Early puberty can also be a sign of estrogen dominance, something else I think I have and that can be managed :)

Edited by taddie, 26 February 2014 - 11:21 PM.


#21 madefromscratch

Posted 26 February 2014 - 11:27 PM

I remember a good friend at school started growing hair under her arms at 10.  Some kids were quite cruel about it.

My mum bought a 'what's happening to me' book when my older sister was about 10, she was an early developer.  She wanted us to hold off shaving as long as possible and we 'weren't allowed' until high school.  My advice around that would be that it's perhaps not so much a permission thing as something your girls need to choose.  It sounds like you are wanting to give them choice, which I think is great.

Could you raise it without raising it?  Not sure if you could have a talk with them about different bras, sanitary products etc and  discuss hair removal as well?  Just an idea.

Hope it all goes well.

#22 akkiandmalli

Posted 27 February 2014 - 03:31 AM

I grew hair at 9 and got my period at 10 it's normal in my family.. I took dd to doc recently as she has has breast buds she is almost 8 doc has said it's all normal with family history.., lol I remember underarm hair being so embarrassing I used to get mum to help me shave it at 9! Will deg be giving dd that option.. Kids can be vary cruel

#23 Handsfull

Posted 27 February 2014 - 03:51 PM

 greenthumbs, on 26 February 2014 - 07:33 PM, said:

I don't mean this to sound rude, but are you perhaps projecting your own issues on this? Forgive me if that sounds mean (I only have a toddler DS so don't have to deal with any of this yet) but wouldn't it be best to wait until they bring it up?

I was an early developer who was so embarrassed by my body hair and would have loved to have a mum who would have listened and let me shave earlier (so it's great you're open to the idea) but I think if it was brought up that perhaps I should get rid of it in case others don't like it, I would have had a huge complex about it and become even more concerned about my appearance.

Greenthumbs - no I am not projecting it on to my girls.  LOL!  Wish I was but just want to be prepared and have options up my sleeve.

In relation to their peers because they are constantly swimming, wearing singlet tops etc I think they will draw way more looks by their peers if they have hairy armpits.  My children are terrible in terms of social interaction with peers now with their speech impairment/learning issues (don't really have any real friends at all) that I think that knowing others are making fun of them would upset them greatly.  Esp for something I can help them with so easily.

Think the cream might be a good bet to begin with as the thought of them shaving so early really doesn't sit well with me.  I would love them to wax when they start as I wish I had.

Thanks for all the opinions and options.  Much appreciated.

#24 The Princess

Posted 27 February 2014 - 04:07 PM

 FloralArrangement, on 26 February 2014 - 03:33 PM, said:

I shaved under dd10's arms the first time only a few hairs, nothing much. She just informed me she shaves every once in a while, no dramas. The BO isn't as bad with the shaving.

My DD (12) shaves and has done since October, but the BO is at time still horrid, even with deoderant.

#25 The Princess

Posted 27 February 2014 - 04:13 PM

 handsfull, on 26 February 2014 - 03:20 PM, said:

Hi EBers

My twin DDs (10.5 years) have started to get underarm hair and pubic hair so I know puberty is starting....OMG I am so not ready for this! Posted Image  


I dont think we can ever be ready for this, it means our baby girls are growing up.

I have heard from a few people that the period usually starts within 12 months of pubic hair starting.

My DD is 12 (13 in December), so I am expecting her periods to start sometime this year, and have prepared her for it a little bit, by providing her with some pads and spare undies in her school bag just incase it happens at school.




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