Jump to content

My girls have started getting underarm hair..WDYD


  • Please log in to reply
52 replies to this topic

#26 liveworkplay

Posted 27 February 2014 - 04:44 PM

Quote

I have heard from a few people that the period usually starts within 12 months of pubic hair starting.

Medical professionals usually advise that menstruation starts 12 months after breast buds appear.

#27 Empress NG

Posted 28 February 2014 - 08:51 AM

My daughter asked me to buy her some Nair.  She had been in Italy with her dad and staying with a family with teenage girls who used Nair.  Be careful if your girls have sensitive skin though, ie, gives me (but not my daughter) a rash.

#28 Soontobegran

Posted 28 February 2014 - 09:12 AM

I actually don't know when my girls started shaving their armpits. We talked about it, they knew I did mine, they knew where the razors were.

They certainly weren't doing it at 10 because they were a year or so off puberty but they probably were by 12.

They played basketball, did dancing etc and they wanted to have hairless armpits.

They soon developed their own preference for hair removal, some shaved, some creamed and some waxed.....I just provided their tools. :smile:

#29 Sassenach2

Posted 28 February 2014 - 09:21 AM

I was about 12 when I first had underarm hair and my mother just shaved it one day and I spent the next few days with itchy armpits and wished she hadn't done it! I cannot remember what happened with my own daughter, but I think her peers would have shaving parties in their bedrooms. :doh:

#30 taddie

Posted 28 February 2014 - 12:56 PM

I'd steer clear of the chemicals but they are kinder prickle wise than shaving. Razors create a sharp hair end, that's the problem. Dissolving the hair with chemicals or pulling it out and making it regrow both result in a soft tip to the hair that won't irritate, but you have to deal with ingrowns.

I'll probably be taking mine to laser if they don't like waxing. We don't do chemicals where ever possible.

#31 Mpjp is feral

Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:08 PM

View Postliveworkplay, on 26 February 2014 - 09:08 PM, said:

We are under the care of a GP and Paed. But thanks for your concern Posted Image



Unfortunately, they class 7 as the early side of normal these days Posted Image Unless things are progressing rapidly, they don't do anything but watch and wait. Thankfully she has yet to develop breast buds, so things are not at the crucial point yet. At this rate the Paed suggests she will start menstruating at around 11. Way too young IMO Posted Image  Luckily she is very tall for her age (over 140cm) but I would hate for her to be a "shorty" after towering over her peers since birth.


One of my dd's had pubic hair at 6yo and I FREAKED out. Our paed (and my further research) suggested that until the breast buds come, hair development is not a sign of puberty.

She's now almost 10 and still no sign of breast buds.

#32 Handsfull

Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:31 PM

Yes DD1 has started to get sore breasts and has complained about it.  It must be sore as she has a high pain tolerance.  Our Paed said to me last year when the breast buds appear about a year.

I already have gone through with them as best I can (ASD comprehension issues) about their body changing and what will happen.

I have a little pack in their school bags, change of undies, panty liners etc in case there is an incident at school.

I think I need to give them the options re hair removal or expose them to the options so they understand and they can try.  Maybe let them watch me shave under my arms.....they float in and out of the bathroom anyway just never stay and watch!! LOL!! ;)

Thanks again.

#33 angel2010

Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:40 PM

I started my periods shortly after my 11th birthday... I am 5'6, so not short... I was just a big girl and already had breasts etc by 9... by 10 I had to wear a bra.

The hardest thing was being the "first" in my class with these things to deal with... the boys started noticing my changes and commenting a lot... the girls asked constantly if I had my period yet (we had just had the "talk" at school and they were fascinated!)...

I was embarrassed by it all, but I got over it... plus by 12-13 most of them had their periods too - one of my friends was really miffed coz she was the last to get it! The day she did, she raced into school yelling "it came, I've got it!!!!"

I think it is hard no matter when you go through these changes...

My mum never acted like any of it was a big deal... she stocked up the bathroom with pads so I didn't have to ask her to buy them (a source of discomfort for me)... she let me shave if I wanted to...

There will be some who disagree with this, but Mum was a bit stricter than most about dressing me in ways that made them look too mature...

I got a lot of attention from men once I had breasts etc... I looked older than I was and even at 11-12 had fully grown men leering at me wherever I went... very confusing. As a result, I wasn't allowed makeup, tight or low cut tops and clothes that made me look "busty" as early as some of my friends were... I totally get why now! ; )

#34 I'm Batman

Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:45 PM

If your daughters are old enough to grow hair on their armpits they are old enough to be talked to gently, and asked if they wanted to shave/wax whatever. I can't understand the attitude of "its to early". Its not like they get a choice about it. Its happening with or without you being ok with it.

if they don't even think its an option, they might be far to embarrassed to ask. Some children are terrified of asking because they get odd reactions from their parents, ones that signal shame.  I would think its my place to be on board and open up conversations about grooming like they are everyday things to think about.

#35 angel2010

Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:48 PM

View Posthandsfull, on 28 February 2014 - 01:31 PM, said:

Yes DD1 has started to get sore breasts and has complained about it.  It must be sore as she has a high pain tolerance.  Our Paed said to me last year when the breast buds appear about a year.

I already have gone through with them as best I can (ASD comprehension issues) about their body changing and what will happen.

I have a little pack in their school bags, change of undies, panty liners etc in case there is an incident at school.

I think I need to give them the options re hair removal or expose them to the options so they understand and they can try.  Maybe let them watch me shave under my arms.....they float in and out of the bathroom anyway just never stay and watch!! LOL!! Posted Image

Thanks again.


I didn't see your mentioning ASD before I posted...

My younger sister is ASD and has a lot of trouble managing BO, her periods, shaving etc... this is extremely common for girls on the spectrum...

a lot of mothers report having to physically make their daughters change their pads etc, as the sensory issues etc mean they don't sense the same feelings that help us know we a) have our period and b) need to change our pads regularly...

Not trying to upset or scare you, but it may be something your daughters really struggle with : (

#36 Handsfull

Posted 28 February 2014 - 04:16 PM

View Postangel2010, on 28 February 2014 - 01:48 PM, said:

I didn't see your mentioning ASD before I posted...

My younger sister is ASD and has a lot of trouble managing BO, her periods, shaving etc... this is extremely common for girls on the spectrum...

a lot of mothers report having to physically make their daughters change their pads etc, as the sensory issues etc mean they don't sense the same feelings that help us know we a) have our period and b) need to change our pads regularly...

Not trying to upset or scare you, but it may be something your daughters really struggle with : (

Thanks Angel for your thoughts, appreciate them.  Yes DD1 has ASD and DD2 has her own "issues" with comprehension.  So between the two its Groundhog Day on some many things.

Fully on top of the BO but know with periods its going to be a long uphill battle, even their SEU teachers have said its going to be an interesting time.  DD1 gets hormonal as it is near full moon time so through in their a period and its going to be full on for us.  We've done some education (best I can do myself, am all prepared) and I think they understand the concept, they are hoping just to have a few drops of blood (blood phobia as well!! OMG!!!)  and it only happens once a month.  

I think when it starts I have to evaluate the situation and decide whether which way to go after that.  

But thanks for the heads up, I'm taking baby steps on all things concerning puberty as it definitely will be interesting...maybe I'll write a blog from a mothers perspective.  ;)

#37 kadoodle

Posted 07 March 2014 - 08:09 PM

Is a hormone injection or the mini pill so their period doesn't come at all an option?

#38 sophiasmum

Posted 08 March 2014 - 08:30 PM

My DD is 10.5 has pubic hair but not underarms yet. If she came to me asking to get rid of it I would let her.

#39 *l&k*mama

Posted 16 March 2014 - 09:41 AM

All this is private yeah? members only?  I'd hate for my daughter to read this:

Underarm hair - my daughter started using Nair sensitive cream to remove hers in year 6, so aged around 11.  After a few times, she just taught herself to shave, quicker and easier.  She is *touch wood * so far not smelly but uses a roll on deodorant most days.

Pubic hair - as MPJP said, not always a sign of puberty.  My daughter has had some pubes since age 7!  But the "real" pubes have grown in the past 6 months, so again, around age 11.

Leg hair - despite being dark skinned/haired I didn't allow leg hair removal until her year 6 farewell.  We were going to wax but couldn't afford it, so big sister shaved them for her.  She now shaves them herself.

Eyebrows - I have allowed eyebrow waxing since she was 10 as her eyebrows grew really bushy and curly. It makes such a difference to her pretty face so every few months we have them done.  She had her upper lip done last time too.

She has small - almost even - breasts now, not enough for a bra but enough to wear a crop top under school uniform blouse.

Her body is changing, putting on weight on her bum and hips so I know periods can't be far off, but I hope beyone hope they stay away a while longer as she is an elite dancer.

PS whilst medical professionals might say it's 12 months from breast buds, mums will tell you it's 12 months from hair.

Edited by *l&k*mama, 16 March 2014 - 10:07 AM.


#40 Kathryn74

Posted 31 March 2014 - 09:37 AM

My DD is 11 in June and I started noticing some underarm hair at the start of the year.  She hasn't noticed (or at least mentioned it) yet, so I haven't said anything.  When she does I'll let her decide what she wants to do about it.  She is not self conscious though.  I have enough trouble getting her to change her undies in the morning!  She does get BO though and when I remind her (constantly!) will put on a roll on deodorant.

No other signs of puberty yet about from the odd hormones.  I was a late starter- 13 when I got my period, so I am in no rush!

#41 jeek

Posted 14 April 2014 - 04:23 PM

My 8 yo dd started getting underarm hair and breast buds a few months ago. I was horrified at first but there hasn't been any more growth since. Her pediatrician said that generally menstruation doesn't start until they hit 50kg, which is why women who lose a lot of weight will stop getting their periods when they dip below 50kg. I found that reassuring!

#42 Handsfull

Posted 14 April 2014 - 04:50 PM

Hopefully then it's a while away as they are about 37kg.  DD2 starting to catch up to DD1 so it's only time.



#43 Weirdly Sane

Posted 14 April 2014 - 05:11 PM

handsfull have sent you a PM, good luck with it all!

#44 Greatmum

Posted 24 May 2015 - 06:53 PM

I wasn't 50kg til I was 30 and had two kids got period when I was 13.

#45 Chocolate Addict

Posted 24 May 2015 - 07:40 PM

Quote

All this is private yeah? members only?  I'd hate for my daughter to read this:

Nope, this is not a members only area.
I just went to the website without logging in and found/read this post.

If you didn't have photos/names of your kids in your signature they wouldn't have known it was them being spoken about.

#46 sophiasmum

Posted 25 May 2015 - 08:54 AM

My DD has had her period for quite a long time & boobs & pubic hair for long as well. But recently I noticed she is starting to get underarm hair, she will be 12 in July. I asked her when she wanted to start shaving it & she said not yet the hair didn't bother her so I'm going to leave it up to her for now. When it gets too hairy I'll ask her to do it.

#47 waawa17

Posted 25 May 2015 - 09:55 AM

View Postsophiasmum, on 25 May 2015 - 08:54 AM, said:

My DD has had her period for quite a long time & boobs & pubic hair for long as well. But recently I noticed she is starting to get underarm hair, she will be 12 in July. I asked her when she wanted to start shaving it & she said not yet the hair didn't bother her so I'm going to leave it up to her for now. When it gets too hairy I'll ask her to do it.

Why? It's not compulsory.

#48 SeaPrincess

Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:11 AM

I just shaved with Mums razor in the bathroom. I don't think she even knew.

View Postjeek, on 14 April 2014 - 04:23 PM, said:

Her pediatrician said that generally menstruation doesn't start until they hit 50kg

If my paed told me this, I'd be looking for a new one. I doubt I was 50kg when I got my period at 13, and I was turned away from the blood bank for weighing under 50kg when I was 19 or 20, but I never stopped menstruating.

#49 Jacts72

Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:41 AM

My mum gave me Nair as I had blond underarm hair but was getting worried about what my friends said. I didn worry to much about legs as they were very blond.

My 7 year old is getting some hair now but it is very blond but if she worries i will go nair rather than shaving as the hair does grow back finer.

#50 BadCat

Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:44 AM

View Postsophiasmum, on 25 May 2015 - 08:54 AM, said:

My DD has had her period for quite a long time & boobs & pubic hair for long as well. But recently I noticed she is starting to get underarm hair, she will be 12 in July. I asked her when she wanted to start shaving it & she said not yet the hair didn't bother her so I'm going to leave it up to her for now. When it gets too hairy I'll ask her to do it.

Please don't.

There is no reason why she should remove her hair if it doesn't bother her.

I told my DD that it was common for women to remove it but that it was entirely up to her.  Mostly she doesn't bother, and good for her.

MY mother spotted it while we were out in public and announced to the world that it was disgusting and I should be shaving.  I was so embarrassed that I shaved it for years when I really should never have done it at all.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.