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Charged full fees on Australia Day


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#51 girltribe4

Posted 01 February 2015 - 06:41 PM

View PostFeralishous, on 01 February 2015 - 12:46 AM, said:

Our centre only charges the rebated amount for public holidays (so we pay zero gap)
One of the main reasons we chose the centre in the first place.

I love how it is completely legal for centres to do this but if we did it in FDC we are fraudsters :no2:
Completely normal in FDC to pay for Public holidays but no care and should be with your fee information ?
I went against the grain and don't charge as I really love having the extra day off occasionally .

#52 ChloeT

Posted 16 February 2015 - 12:26 AM

Sorry but I can't believe this is standard practice!? Basically they are saying that they are not offering the service but you still have to pay for it? They can't have it both ways - either they open on public holidays and if you don't want to send your child it's your choice but you still have to pay, or they shut but then do not charge for the day. PP if fair trading said they can have that in t&c's I think they need a refresher course in consumer law. This was one of my specialities and while I can't give legal advice, I will just say this: unfair terms in consumer contracts - look into it. I mean couldn't think of a more apt example of I tried! Personally I would fight it, but then again I fight everything. Most of the time I'm right though.

#53 Bam1

Posted 16 February 2015 - 12:33 AM

So ChloeT when you have a free day from work due to a public holiday do you tell your boss as you are not providing any services to only pay you for 4 days that week?

#54 Beqa

Posted 16 February 2015 - 03:17 AM

It is standard. I was as shocked as you were when I found out OP. Seven years of LDC and I have moved on from the rage.

#55 JomoMum

Posted 16 February 2015 - 06:00 AM

View PostChloeT, on 16 February 2015 - 12:26 AM, said:

Sorry but I can't believe this is standard practice!? Basically they are saying that they are not offering the service but you still have to pay for it? They can't have it both ways - either they open on public holidays and if you don't want to send your child it's your choice but you still have to pay, or they shut but then do not charge for the day. PP if fair trading said they can have that in t&c's I think they need a refresher course in consumer law. This was one of my specialities and while I can't give legal advice, I will just say this: unfair terms in consumer contracts - look into it. I mean couldn't think of a more apt example of I tried! Personally I would fight it, but then again I fight everything. Most of the time I'm right though.
I think you'll find you're wrong on this one.

#56 hills mum bec

Posted 16 February 2015 - 06:06 AM

View PostChloeT, on 16 February 2015 - 12:26 AM, said:

Sorry but I can't believe this is standard practice!? Basically they are saying that they are not offering the service but you still have to pay for it? They can't have it both ways - either they open on public holidays and if you don't want to send your child it's your choice but you still have to pay, or they shut but then do not charge for the day. PP if fair trading said they can have that in t&c's I think they need a refresher course in consumer law. This was one of my specialities and while I can't give legal advice, I will just say this: unfair terms in consumer contracts - look into it. I mean couldn't think of a more apt example of I tried! Personally I would fight it, but then again I fight everything. Most of the time I'm right though.

What a fantastic life you must lead to always be right about everything.  God forbid those sneaky, cunning child care workers on minimum wages should actually get paid for public holidays like the rest of the workforce.

#57 tenar

Posted 16 February 2015 - 06:24 AM

Nobody is suggesting that childcare workers shouldn't get paid for public holidays.   That's a total straw man argument in this silly discussion.

Let me say it again: Nobody is suggesting that childcare workers shouldn't get paid for public holidays!

If you normally have a haircut on Mondays but one Monday the place is closed because it's a public holiday, do you expect to have to pay anyway even though you didn't get a hair cut?

If you normally shop for groceries on a Monday but one day the supermarket is closed because it's a public holiday do you expect to have to pay anyway?

If your child has swimming lessons on Mondays do you pay for those Mondays when the pool is closed because it's a public holiday?  Our swimming centre charges depending on the number of lessons given?

Yet all of those businesses manage to pay their employees normally, including holiday pay.  They do it because holiday pay is part of normal business operating costs.  So you set your prices so that those costs are covered, along with all of the other costs involved in running the business.

I don't normally weigh into this conversation because I don't have a child in daycare.  But honestly I'm suprised by the number of people who are accusing others of not wanting to pay employees properly and also of the number of people who are preening and saying, in effect, "silly newbie you shouldn't have chosen a Monday" when the OP has simply been caught out by a particularly ridiculous and unfair system that for reasons unknown to me prevails in this industry alone.  No other industry would get away with this kind of behaviour.  I think it comes down to the fact that people who really need care will suck up whatever unfair conditions prevail without arguing about it because they need the care.

#58 Bam1

Posted 16 February 2015 - 06:37 AM

A haircut or groceries is a stupid comparison, you don't sign up to them and there are no contractual obligations on either side. Businesses can recoup their public holiday costs in whatever manner they think is best for their business. There can be arguments whether one method is better than another but if a daycare has gone the route of charging for public holidays then yes that's just what you have to do.

You are going to pay the cost anyway, whether it's by charging public holidays or like groceries/haircuts putting up the prices on the other days, so I'll leave my concern for true outrages

Edited by Bam1, 16 February 2015 - 06:42 AM.


#59 poss71

Posted 16 February 2015 - 06:51 AM

When my two were in childcare, I had DD1 in on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. It was a very popular centre and I was able to get DD2 in only because I took Monday initially and then Friday when it came available.

I decided to treat those public holidays as being covered by my CCR. It made the pain of paying full fees somewhat more bearable.

It is also good for getting your foot in the door, as we were given first option when a Wednesday spot became available for DD2, while the waiting list for places was counted in months.

#60 Cat Burglar

Posted 16 February 2015 - 06:53 AM

You have to pay for it at most childcare centres. Its pretty sucky, but its the way it goes. You might be able to find the odd FDC that doesnt charge for public hols, but I wouldnt move my kids just for that if they were otherwise happy.

I think the difficult
thing is too many jobs are contract / casual now so its really hard on the parents who work those jobs and therefore get no income on public holidays and still have to fork out, esp. if they have more than one kid. Although, 'in theory' they should be getting paid more per hour... but then their CCB goes down for that privilege.

ETA, just realised that pp said FDC cant do this

Edited by Cat Burglar, 16 February 2015 - 07:00 AM.


#61 almostoutnumbered

Posted 16 February 2015 - 07:24 AM

My DD is in FDC and we pay for public holidays as well, I think this is standard across the scheme, as far as I know. It did suprise me at first, but now with my third going through childcare you just accept thats how it is. I also love my Family day carer, which helps and know she puts her heart and soul into looking after my daughter so am happy to pay.
Family day carers have been subjected to a lot of regulation changes, and can only now look after 4 children at any time, so their earning capacity is limited. I pay a lot less to my carer per day than I would be at the local child care centre so that also helps me put it into perspective.
The only time I don't pay is if my carer is sick or takes any leave. She closes for 2 weeks over Christmas and we don't pay then, so that takes care of a number of public holidays. If anything I think my carer does not get paid enough for the work she does, she's worth her weight in gold.

#62 Bam1

Posted 16 February 2015 - 07:43 AM

What is being forgotten is that with the centre charging for public holidays you are able to claim CCB for that day whilst if they just increased the prices for the other days there is no increase in CCB.

So the centre is actually helping you to reduce your costs by charging you!

#63 mummy3

Posted 16 February 2015 - 07:52 AM

I am a FDC care provider and charge for public holidays. I get a whole $6.50 an hour (that's 3.25 for parents after CCR!) so yeah I don't feel guilty about taking public holiday fees!!!!

#64 Lifesgood

Posted 16 February 2015 - 08:01 AM

What I am shocked by is how little brain power some people put into thinking these things through.

One way or another you have to pay for the service to make it a sustainable, ongoing business. They have costs to cover throughout the year. They need to make enough money to run the business and to reinvest some capital into it. And if it is a 'for profit' business then they also need to make extra money to return to their investors. Its not that complicated. Whether they charge on public holidays or spread the cost over the year, we have to pay one way or another.

Common sense first, entitlement mentality last.

#65 Lifesgood

Posted 16 February 2015 - 08:03 AM

View PostFright bat, on 01 February 2015 - 07:27 AM, said:

OP, I think the bigger issue is that you DON'T get paid on a public holiday, rather than the fact that other people (including your FDC person) do. Casual employment sucks. Can you move to a more permanent position? Because you're probably missing out on other things, like paid annual leave.

Aren't casual pay rates structured to cover entitlements? My DH effectively works on a casual (though full time) basis, and his rate covers super, annual leave, sick leave, public holidays etc. He receives the payment when he works. If he doesn't work he receives no money. It is up to him to budget his rate across the year to cover those periods when he isn't working.

#66 Vickery

Posted 16 February 2015 - 08:11 AM

View PostSnazzyFeral, on 31 January 2015 - 11:51 PM, said:

That is normal. Think of it this way  your boss still pays you as though you are at work on a public holiday even when you aren't.

Yes that's true, but any other business closed on a public holiday is not generating income either but staff still get paid. It's an absolute rort and I don't understand how day care centres get away with it.

#67 Bam1

Posted 16 February 2015 - 08:14 AM

View PostVickery, on 16 February 2015 - 08:11 AM, said:

Yes that's true, but any other business closed on a public holiday is not generating income either but staff still get paid. It's an absolute rort and I don't understand how day care centres get away with it.

It's not a rort, the centres are actually helping you as you can claim CCB. if they just upped the overall fee you would not get CCB on th PH.

#68 EsmeLennox

Posted 16 February 2015 - 08:21 AM

Basically it's this... You either pay for the PH or the fees go up for every day. The income from these days would be factored into the running of the centre.

It's always been the case, my first child attended daycare 12 years ago... We paid for PH then too. It didn't occur to me to be bothered by that.

#69 lozoodle

Posted 16 February 2015 - 08:26 AM

Yes you still pay childcare fees on public holidays, this is fairly standard. Unless stated otherwise at the discretion of the centre.

#70 Jane Jetson

Posted 16 February 2015 - 08:45 AM

View PostPearson, on 01 February 2015 - 08:20 AM, said:

They have Mondays free because no one will suck it up and take them.  

On the bright side, this is how you get into centres that are otherwise full - take the Monday. You then have dibs on any other days that come up, ahead of people who are still on the waiting list but wouldn't take the Monday.

View PostBam1, on 16 February 2015 - 06:37 AM, said:

A haircut or groceries is a stupid comparison, you don't sign up to them and there are no contractual obligations on either side.

It's more like your phone contract, I think, if we're going to do analogies. If DH and I drive between say Canberra and Cowra, there's going to be vast swathes in between where I can't muck about on the Internets while he drives, because we've gone into a spot with no coverage. I don't get to ring Vodafone and get a discount on that time.

#71 MrsLexiK

Posted 16 February 2015 - 09:06 AM

View PostVickery, on 16 February 2015 - 08:11 AM, said:



Yes that's true, but any other business closed on a public holiday is not generating income either but staff still get paid. It's an absolute rort and I don't understand how day care centres get away with it.
Not always at all. The business I worked for still has people putting orders in. Banks still get interest (they actually get more as they hold the money over a public holiday). Not all day cares are running at a massive profit, and without the fees over 5 days they would struggle to pay their workers. FDC careers tend to not be mega wealthy either sure they could up the fees to cover the puic holiday you will find it would cost you more. There are casual are centres that don't charge on public holidays they are usually open feb-mid dec, can only book in 2 weeks in advance and can't get ccb for it.



#72 MrsLexiK

Posted 16 February 2015 - 09:07 AM

I sti had to pay for my gym membership even though on a public holiday the hours are like a Sunday not a normal work day or closed altogether. (Depending on which public holiday)

#73 Hollycoddle

Posted 16 February 2015 - 09:11 AM

Yes it is normal, they still have to cover their expenses.  Up until as late as last year ours didn't charge (community organisation-run centre) but alas it caught up with them so now we fall into line with the norm.  You should still get the CCB though if eligible for that (I think you do, anyway - our bill is usually the same in times where public hols fall).

#74 Hollycoddle

Posted 16 February 2015 - 09:11 AM

Double post.

Edited by Mollycoddle, 16 February 2015 - 09:11 AM.


#75 HappyTapper

Posted 16 February 2015 - 09:12 AM

I am surprised at how many people don't get why you get invoiced for public holidays!




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