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Naturopath for headaches?


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11 replies to this topic

#1 Maserati Mum

Posted 19 March 2015 - 04:40 PM

Just wondering if anyone has any advice on whether a naturopath might be a good option to help manage my headaches and migraines? I've had many medical checks and seen a neurologist, but have suffered with chronic headaches for years.

Thanks

#2 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 20 March 2015 - 11:11 AM

Naturopath was useless for me.

Chiropractor was wonderful did assessment of my spine, sent me for X-rays before he did anything. On the plus side he also realigned my jaw which meant no jaw pain and no longer is the dentist suggesting trying root canal to get rid of pain.

Anti tyramine diet also helps with my migraines, but as my migraines are also hormonal getting Implanon put in again to level out hormones has been best for me.

I also take veracaps SR too which has helped with everyday headaches. I was concerned I was developing codeine addiction (not high dose, but couldn't go a day without taking something) and now only need to take something once a month of so.

#3 Maserati Mum

Posted 20 March 2015 - 03:45 PM

Thanks for your post, I'll look in to some of those suggestions. I have kept a food diary before but the neuro couldn't identify any obvious triggers.

The migraines are quite sporadic and I can live with them every so often, it's the cluster headaches that last weeks (on/off) that affect every day life.

#4 tres

Posted 20 March 2015 - 03:49 PM

ANother thing to try would be Chinese Medicine. I know of a couple of chronic migraine sufferers who have had much relief from acupuncture and herbs (will probably include massage and cupping too).

#5 BornToLove

Posted 20 March 2015 - 04:21 PM

I would keep a journal of your headaches to pin point your triggers if you haven't already done so. If it's simple lifestyle triggers like food/sleep/stress, a naturopath might be helpful for you.
Mid your triggers are environmental or hormonal, save your money.

#6 Mary Whether

Posted 20 March 2015 - 04:23 PM

I did find acupuncture offered some relief, but it needs to be done regularly.

Best wishes.

#7 anyagujraal

Posted 20 March 2015 - 04:25 PM

No idea any way thanks for your thoughts

#8 Maserati Mum

Posted 22 March 2015 - 04:03 PM

View Postanyagujraal, on 20 March 2015 - 04:25 PM, said:

No idea any way thanks for your thoughts

???


Thanks everyone, appreciate your replies. Keeping a journal about other life things (sleep/stress etc.) is a great idea too.

#9 TVi97

Posted 18 May 2015 - 08:54 AM

View Postelle-M, on 20 March 2015 - 03:45 PM, said:

Thanks for your post, I'll look in to some of those suggestions. I have kept a food diary before but the neuro couldn't identify any obvious triggers.

The migraines are quite sporadic and I can live with them every so often, it's the cluster headaches that last weeks (on/off) that affect every day life.


Have you looked into your hormones?  women experience headaches and migraines when our hormones are out of balance.  You can get a hormone panel done via a simple blood test.  This will show you exactly which hormone is too low.  Most of the time it's due to low progesterone levels.

When you have an idea which hormone to focus on, please, do not use synthetic hormones as they will just increase your chance of cancer by 200%.  There are natural ways to deal with hormones that are not harmful and have been very effective.

#10 PrincessPeach

Posted 24 February 2016 - 10:47 AM

I'd look into an osteopath as well.

Something mine said to me was that the skull isn't actually one fused bone as everyone thinks, but does have very small gaps. So for some migraine sufferers a few visits can help.

If you are in Brisbane I can pm you the name of the guy I see - he isn't cheap, but I call him a miracle man.

#11 ECsMum

Posted 24 February 2016 - 11:19 AM

how's your BP?  found out mine was high and was the source of the majority of my headaches - now on meds and haven't had a non hormone related one since...

#12 Feral Snow

Posted 24 February 2016 - 11:41 AM

A naturopath could be a good place to start.  Sometimes they are more open/informed about unusual or uncommon health triggers.

E.g. when I asked my GP if my eczema could be diet induced he said eczema is rarely caused by food and so it's better to use moisturisers and cortisone creams to treat it symptomatically than to try elimination diets.  I went to a naturopath and lo and behold, by eliminating dairy, soy, tomato and wheat (not other gluten containing cereals) I was eczema free for the first time in 24 years.

I also get tyramine headaches.  It was the naturopath that gave me a sheet from the America "National Headache Foundation" about the foods to avoid for tyramine headaches.  The GP thought it unlikely that I was getting headaches from avocado, almonds and dried apricots.  Wrong.
http://www.headaches...sufferers-diet/
http://www.nmh.org/c...ine-diet-08.pdf
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyramine

You've probably covered the following ideas, but anyway:

I also think it can be a good idea to get checked by a physio/osteo/chiro as shoulder, neck and jaw tension or bad posture can cause headaches.  Even a regular massage might help if this is a contributor.

Finally, scented deodorants, perfume, washing powder, air fresheners can cause headaches - especially if you're surrounded by layers of them.  I use unscented deodorant, moisturiser, soap, shampoo, washing powder and cleaning products for this reason.  They can be a pain to source as a lot of "natural", "green" and "organic" products are still scented.  I get an instant headache if I walk the cleaning aisle at the supermarket.




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