Jump to content

Private Health Insurance - a few questions


  • Please log in to reply
73 replies to this topic

#51 Stoked

Posted 28 October 2015 - 09:21 PM

View PostLady Sybil Vimes, on 28 October 2015 - 06:52 PM, said:

Maybe there's an element of luck of the draw, there?
Of course. The best of luck would be not to have to go to hospital at all.

View PostSoontobegran, on 28 October 2015 - 05:59 PM, said:

My DD's management fee was under $2k 3 years ago.
There are fortunately still obstetricians who keep their management fee affordable around these parts.

Inner city you tend to pay more as you are helping to pay their outrageous room rental prices. :(
I know, even tomatoes in my old local grocery were 2x the price compared with almost everywhere else. But since Isolabella had her children a while back I assumed she paid the same outrageous OB management fees but Medicare softened the blow with the then 80% OOP costs reimbursement.

#52 PrincessPeach

Posted 29 October 2015 - 07:16 PM

Some of these management fees are insane.

DS I paid $1,200 and second time round with the same Ob I'm getting charged $1,000. Second baby discount I think, that's not 100% out of pocket, Medicare comes off that.

I can also do shared care with my GP, so a lot of my appointments prior are bulked billed (a bulk billing GP is as rare as hens teeth, so I'm not giving them up).

#53 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 29 October 2015 - 08:39 PM

View PostStoked, on 28 October 2015 - 05:51 PM, said:

Isolabella, we delivered our babies at the same hospital :)). You would have delivered yours before the scheduled Medicare fee for the pregnancy management was capped at ~$500? So OOP amounts were not as high as they are now for a private OB.

No that was the PG mgmt fee, not the OPE. My OPE was very low as you said as I reached the Medicare threshold so generally got most of it back. As that no longer applies as it is capped at $500 I was just putting the full PG mgmt fee paid.

Pay OB was very reasonable, but the last price was for 2009 ;)

#54 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 29 October 2015 - 08:43 PM

My sisters OB was a $6k PG mgmt fee..... Different city different OB.

#55 Soontobegran

Posted 30 October 2015 - 08:42 AM

View PostIsolabella, on 29 October 2015 - 08:43 PM, said:

My sisters OB was a $6k PG mgmt fee..... Different city different OB.

A popular inner city Melbourne obstetricians's management fee is a tad under $9k. :no2:
He obviously has narrowed his market but it suits his ego.

#56 Stoked

Posted 30 October 2015 - 01:55 PM

Soontobegran, I hope he is very good looking! I am grasping at straws here finding why I could possibly justify choosing him over anyone else.

#57 MsBusy123

Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:25 PM

I had a slightly checkered fertility and obstetrics history, so having a private OB has always been the best choice  for me.

This is my third full-term pregnancy and the second with my current OB. I have a great relationship with him, and because he's been involved in all but my first pregnancy, he understands my anxieties and is greatly mindful of my emotional wellbeing as well as my physical. This aspect is very important to me, along with having my husband being able to stay with me, having my own room and bathroom etc.

For some reason when this topic comes up, everybody gets defensive about their choices and it seems like they need to justify whatever decisions they make (whilst laying the boots into the other options), but everyone has different priorities and different expectations so you can't really say that one model of care is better than the other, just that one aligns better with your priorities.

We're certainly not loaded, and didn't have the $5k that we're out of pocket just laying around, but feeling safe and comfortable when having a baby is important enough to us (and we feel more comfortable and safe with our OB) that we have reorganised our finances and sacrificed other things to make it happen.

Also, we're booked in to the private section of the state's leading tertiary maternity hospital, so in the event that our baby needs additional care that is beyond the capabilities of the private wing, the highest level of care is available in the same building.


#58 Soontobegran

Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:56 PM

View PostStoked, on 30 October 2015 - 01:55 PM, said:

Soontobegran, I hope he is very good looking! I am grasping at straws here finding why I could possibly justify choosing him over anyone else.

:no2:

:)

Edited by Soontobegran, 30 October 2015 - 03:57 PM.


#59 JinksNewton

Posted 30 October 2015 - 08:54 PM

View PostStoked, on 28 October 2015 - 09:21 PM, said:

Of course. The best of luck would be not to have to go to hospital at all.


The idea of not being in hospital to give birth is utterly repugnant to me. Just to me, though, I do think it's intrinsically a great idea to have a home birth, I just didn't want to do it in MY home.

#60 Nobodyelse

Posted 30 October 2015 - 09:13 PM

View PostCopper and May, on 27 October 2015 - 01:51 PM, said:

... and if your father or grandfather was in the Army at any stage, Defence Health is the best.

Or mother or grandmother. Women are in the armed services too.

#61 Genabee

Posted 30 October 2015 - 10:08 PM

View Postbide, on 28 October 2015 - 09:00 AM, said:

For those who went public, how much were you out of pocket for?

I paid for a scan at 8 weeks and a scan at 12 weeks - medicare rebate on some of that. That was it. So $200 maybe?

I saw the same team of midwives throughout my pregnancy and hospital stays.I was hospitalised at 26 weeks for a week, and had fortnightly scans from that point on. Also had regular additional bloodwork. All that was done in the hospital I birthed at (Eastern suburbs, Melbourne). I did not see a bill.

I discharged myself the day after she was born. I never had any intention in staying longer. I had midwives come to the house every second day for a week and then once a week for two weeks after that. I saw a lactation consultant for free, that was affiliated with the hospital. I never required an anaesthetist so can't comment on that, but can only assume it wouldn't have resulted in an additional bill.

Frankly, unless the OB can push the baby out him/her self, I don't see the point. The attraction of a private room or fancy food isn't really that big a carrot for me. I would rather be at home in my own bed, eating my own food. There is nothing comfortable about a hospital bed, regardless of its location or how much I am paying for it.

I'm hoping to have this next one at home. Same midwife the whole way through, with one visit to a back up hospital/OB. I would consider a private OB if my 12 week scan reveals potential issues, or if it was multiples. But I would still choose to birth in a public hospital (perhaps another option to look into?). Chances are if things go pear shaped, you'd end up there anyway. And if I was already high risk, then I would want to be where they were equipped to deal with it.

I would research what you want in the way of birth ( I say that loosely - it's all well and good to have plans, but these things can't be planned, generally), continuity of care etc. If a private room and fancy food is high on your priority list, then go for it. I don't think it is as simple as public vs private. You need to know what you want as both offer different things.

#62 Charli73

Posted 30 October 2015 - 10:30 PM

For me it was location and a pre existing ailment which made me decide I wanted to see the same OB each time and have it managed plus I already had my heart set on the private hospital near home so found an OB who delivered there and her rooms were near home too..

It wasn't the cheapest option but as a first time mum at 37 I'm so glad I did.. i also wanted to stay somewhere small and quiet in comparison to a major public hospital which was further away.. I was in for 7 nights both times and was very pleased with the care..





#63 Burro

Posted 31 October 2015 - 04:26 AM

Id still be interested to know how much PHI with maternity cover costs?

I went public but had two pregnancies that needed extra monitoring. All the extra scans and tests were done at the hospital and didnt cost anything. For my second pregnancy, i had a high risk condition so had to switch from shared care to appointments with a team of obstatricians at the hospital. I was very closely monitored and spent a while in hospital just in case. Many of the women i met there had private mat cover but had been transfered to the public hospital because they were in danger of delivering premature babies.

Have you worked out what your local public hospital is OP?

#64 MrsLexiK

Posted 31 October 2015 - 07:28 AM

View PostGenabee, on 30 October 2015 - 10:08 PM, said:

There is nothing comfortable about a hospital bed, regardless of its location or how much I am paying for it.

After a csection the ability to have a bed literally prop you out is an absolute god send

#65 Stoked

Posted 31 October 2015 - 07:01 PM

View PostCourtesanNewton, on 30 October 2015 - 08:54 PM, said:

The idea of not being in hospital to give birth is utterly repugnant to me. Just to me, though, I do think it's intrinsically a great idea to have a home birth, I just didn't want to do it in MY home.
Oh I meant of course as a non-maternity patient. However much I'd like to think birth is a natural process and not a disease I want all the facilities and relevant staff on standby when I give birth - in a hospital, of course.

#66 Furfeathersfleece

Posted 31 October 2015 - 07:17 PM

Just my experience as a public patient, twice, first in the act then in nsw.

Neither pregnancy cost me a cent (except for thousands of dollars  on zofran due to hyperemesis!). Bloods, scans etc all bulk billed.

I had an excellent experience both times. I had good antenatal care, good birth experiences and wasn't pushed out of hospital either time. In fact, both times I was asked to stay longer than I'd expected (5 days with my first and 3 with my second). They'd have probably kept me longer too if I hadn't been chomping at the bit to leave.

I got a private room with my first and half private/half shared during my second stay.

I breastfed successfully with both (although with my first I wasn't well supported through issues such as tongue tie, jaundice and reflux which set us off on a rocky start. Once they recognized our struggles they upped their game).

Neither of my experiences was perfect but I honestly thoroughly recommend the public system, based on my experiences. I'll plan to go public for my third baby too!

I know of two people who had babies shortly after I did. They went to the same private hospital. Both ended up with c sections and both bottle fed. Another 2 went private both bottle fed (not sure about the method of delivery). I know that at least 3 of the 4 had hoped to breastfeed.

Just mentioned that anecdata as I don't think that going private is necessarily going to improve chances of a natural birth/breastfeeding, should these things be important to you.

Obviously my whole post is anecdata only, so take it or leave it!

#67 bronty_saurus

Posted 02 November 2015 - 12:21 PM

In terms of breastfeeding, I had my son at a private hospital. I wasn't producing any milk for 4 days when the midwives suggested motillium (drug) and bam, out it came. My friend who went public also produced no milk, was sent home after 36 hours with midwives saying Oh well, you're better off bottle feeding. And that was it.

I do believe the fact I was able to breastfeed was down to a longer hospital stay and supervision.

I liked going private and I was lucky enough to be able to afford it for bub2 as well. Nice private room, amazing care, only one ob.

#68 Nobodyelse

Posted 02 November 2015 - 12:25 PM

View Postbronty_saurus, on 02 November 2015 - 12:21 PM, said:

In terms of breastfeeding, I had my son at a private hospital. I wasn't producing any milk for 4 days when the midwives suggested motillium (drug) and bam, out it came. My friend who went public also produced no milk, was sent home after 36 hours with midwives saying Oh well, you're better off bottle feeding. And that was it.

I do believe the fact I was able to breastfeed was down to a longer hospital stay and supervision.

I liked going private and I was lucky enough to be able to afford it for bub2 as well. Nice private room, amazing care, only one ob.

A friend of mine went private and had trouble with latching. The midwives pushed the bottle by day two.

I had both mine public and never had anyone mention bottles to me once. They offered me lactation consultants and breastfeeding clinics but not a single one mentioned bottles.

I liked public. Decent room with only one other person, amazing care and only one OB.

Edited by Drowninginferal, 02 November 2015 - 12:26 PM.


#69 CheekyChia

Posted 02 November 2015 - 06:26 PM

Not read all posts but please remember you have to take out maternity cover thru your private health a certain amount of months befor you conceive

#70 PrincessPeach

Posted 02 November 2015 - 08:01 PM

Just another thought on everyone saying when you go puclib you get midwives visit you at home, check very carefully the service area of your hospital for this.

My SIL was told this, then when she came home she was told, sorry you are 5km too far north, you get a phone call every second day instead.

Also look up the baby friendly hospital accreditation details and see if one of your hospitals is listed on that. I know one of the criteria is that breastfeeding is heavily promoted.

#71 bide

Posted 04 November 2015 - 08:38 AM

View PostBurro, on 31 October 2015 - 04:26 AM, said:

Have you worked out what your local public hospital is OP?

I haven't yet because my DP and I are in the process of house hunting right now (which is a horror in and of itself), but it would be in some specific areas of Melbourne depending on where we go. If I can't find a good public hospital in my area I'll either do PHI or see if I can use his parent's address in Lower Templestowe as I've heard there are some good public hospitals in that area.

Edited by bide, 04 November 2015 - 08:39 AM.


#72 eigne

Posted 04 November 2015 - 06:25 PM

How do you even work out which hospital you are zoned for?

#73 Burro

Posted 04 November 2015 - 06:30 PM

I asked my GP. I think you can also call them and ask. Places like the Royal Womens Melbourne are very popular. A midwife told me that people lie to get in. I supose its your nearest hospital.

#74 bide

Posted 05 November 2015 - 10:28 AM

View PostBurro, on 04 November 2015 - 06:30 PM, said:

A midwife told me that people lie to get in.

I always just assumed it was the nearest hospital! Do hospitals need any proof to make sure you're in their zone? Is a utility bill considered proof?

When I lived in Sydney and went through the public health system I never had to prove where I lived in order to receive health care, so just curious if that's needed here.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.