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Getting a phrase wrong


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#1 namie

Posted 07 January 2016 - 09:30 PM

I'm clearly bored and my time would be better spent cleaning the bathroom, but I've been reading comments on an article linked on Facebook.

For context, it is a news. com. au article, which I refuse to read, comparing Nuala Hafner's interview with a beachgoer with the Chris Gayle 'interview', and commenting on how she wasn't classed as sexist for flirting with him, yet Chris has been labelled sexist and fined money etc.

There's already a thread relating to that, so I won't go into further detail, what caught my eye and made me laugh (some comic relief was much welcome) was this comment:

(my bold)

Quote

Completely different scenario. This is a lifestyle program talking to a random person. Gayle was being interviewed at a professional competition. I has at a guess those supporting Gayle also support the booing of Adam Goodes

What phrases have you gotten wrong?

#2 Black Velvet

Posted 07 January 2016 - 09:44 PM

The one I've seen is people writing "in one foul swoop" instead of "fell swoop".

#3 SMforshort

Posted 07 January 2016 - 09:45 PM

Not me but a consultant who said (more than once) "for all intensive purposes"

#4 happywombat

Posted 07 January 2016 - 09:50 PM

As I child I thought people said

"Homing in"

not the correct saying

"Honing in"

#5 Oogly boogly

Posted 07 January 2016 - 09:59 PM

View PostSMforshort, on 07 January 2016 - 09:45 PM, said:

Not me but a consultant who said (more than once) "for all intensive purposes"

I read this in a book!  Multiple times.

I know someone who will write "the so morning" (this morning).

#6 ladyjadie

Posted 07 January 2016 - 10:10 PM

Not really a phrase as such, but the one I've seen popping up a lot lately is "walah" instead of "voilà"

#7 happywombat

Posted 08 January 2016 - 06:44 PM

View PostKlixie, on 08 January 2016 - 07:35 AM, said:

Just saw toe bar (as opposed to tow bar) in a new EB post.  I hate to has at a guess what I say incorrectly!

sorry you can only say

"hate to has a guess" instead of  "have a guess" if this is you.

If not, please meet Disco

https://www.youtube....h?v=WSn-xrb-Vik

because  "I haz cheezburger" :smile:

Edited by happywombat, 08 January 2016 - 06:50 PM.


#8 Procrastinator5000

Posted 08 January 2016 - 07:04 PM

I had a boyfriend that used to write yestoday instead of yesterday. Bless him.

#9 sasar

Posted 08 January 2016 - 07:13 PM

A work colleague (not a native english speaker but usually better than mine) once told me someone we know "mates with fish". I giggled so she corrected herself to "he breeds with fish".

#10 Dionysus

Posted 08 January 2016 - 07:22 PM

A work colleague used to say 'without further adieu'

#11 rosie28

Posted 08 January 2016 - 07:47 PM

View PostSMforshort, on 07 January 2016 - 09:45 PM, said:

Not me but a consultant who said (more than once) "for all intensive purposes"

It took me a couple of years to convince my husband that this was incorrect. He has it now!

#12 Billy Shears

Posted 08 January 2016 - 08:23 PM

Deputy Principal at my school

"from the go-get".

#13 Sancti-claws

Posted 08 January 2016 - 08:26 PM

In a speech at my cousin's wedding, his best man's father said "since they were whipper snippers"...

#14 Sancti-claws

Posted 09 January 2016 - 08:36 AM

Just saw one on another post - here is a rule to handily remember which one is which:

Don't give a hoot - its MOOT
Can't give a hoot - its MUTE

For years, I thought the word was DILEMNA -to the point of correcting it!!

#15 born.a.girl

Posted 09 January 2016 - 08:40 AM

I'm not phased by any of these mistakes.

#16 somila

Posted 13 January 2016 - 08:43 AM

View PostDionysus, on 08 January 2016 - 07:22 PM, said:

A work colleague used to say 'without further adieu'

Heaps of people say this - I have heard this more times than the correct version, actually.

One of my favourites was when a local newspaper editor used the phrase 'je nous se qua' in her column.  Close - but no cigar!

The world of online conversation has made it more obvious that we don't always know what we think we know when it comes to language.

#17 glassslipper

Posted 13 January 2016 - 09:03 AM

I saw on facebook "What does it have installed for me?" (In store)

Edited by glassslipper, 13 January 2016 - 09:20 AM.


#18 FeralRebelWClaws

Posted 13 January 2016 - 09:15 AM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 09 January 2016 - 08:40 AM, said:

I'm not phased by any of these mistakes.

This I can forgive. It's more of a spelling mistake than the incorrect use of the word/phrase.

View Postsomila, on 13 January 2016 - 08:43 AM, said:

One of my favourites was when a local newspaper editor used the phrase 'je nous se qua' in her column.  Close - but no cigar!
That's pretty bad! eeeep!

#19 Nobodyelse

Posted 13 January 2016 - 09:19 AM

For some inexplicable reason I always say 'have you turned it on and off again?' and have to correct myself.

#20 lozoodle

Posted 13 January 2016 - 09:23 AM

I have a friend who insists on writing "alote" for "a lot". All the time. It takes everything in my power not to correct her.

#21 Mixed_Spice

Posted 13 January 2016 - 09:25 AM

As a kid I always thought it was "pimple free day" instead of "pupil free".
Kind of wish I was correct...

#22 namie

Posted 13 January 2016 - 10:19 AM

View PostDionysus, on 08 January 2016 - 07:22 PM, said:

A work colleague used to say 'without further adieu'
Yes I see this a lot!

View Postsomila, on 13 January 2016 - 08:43 AM, said:

One of my favourites was when a local newspaper editor used the phrase 'je nous se qua' in her column. Close - but no cigar!
It took me several reads of this to work out what she was saying! Surely that's a phrase you'd check before going to print!?

#23 Mollycoddle

Posted 13 January 2016 - 10:34 AM

More a spelling than pronunciation - tow the line instead of toe the line.  I go with the latter - but I can see how people might get the former from it (ie. towing a line behind a boat).  Can anyone confirm which it actually is?

Edited by Mollycoddle, 13 January 2016 - 10:55 AM.


#24 foxbread

Posted 13 January 2016 - 10:44 AM

View Postlozoodle, on 13 January 2016 - 09:23 AM, said:

I have a friend who insists on writing "alote" for "a lot". All the time. It takes everything in my power not to correct her.

I have friend who thought it was "alot" for some years, but then he found this and it cured him: http://hyperboleanda...everything.html

#25 AnaBeavenhauser

Posted 13 January 2016 - 10:44 AM

A friend of mine use to hybrid her phrases....
An example...
The last straw, that broke the camels back




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