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Disposal of Placenta (Homebirth)


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#1 Genabee

Posted 22 March 2016 - 12:49 PM

I have been made aware that following the birth of our baby at home, we are responsible for disposing of the placenta. The midwives are not allowed to travel with it in any capacity.

I have no interest in encapsulation and planting it really isn't an option for us. I would rather it didn't sit in my freezer for too long (we have a small freezer!). I would just like it dealt with and to not really know about it personally, but obviously I need to arrange  for this to happen appropriately.

Where do I go to dispose of it?! I'm pretty sure throwing in it in the bin with regular household waste would be highly illegal!

I have looked on our local and surrounding councils' websites to find out if any of them offer some kind of medical waste facility but none appear to. I'm assuming I can't just rock up to the local hospital with it!

I am in Perth if this makes a difference.

Interested to know what you did with yours, or if anyone has some advice. PMs welcome if you would prefer not to share on the forum.

TIA.

#2 CallMeFeral

Posted 22 March 2016 - 12:55 PM

Really the bin is illegal? I'd have thought given period products and meats go in there it would be ok.

How about the old bury it in the garden and plant a tree on top that will grow alongside your new bub?

#3 Genabee

Posted 22 March 2016 - 01:03 PM

View PostCallMeFeral, on 22 March 2016 - 12:55 PM, said:


How about the old bury it in the garden and plant a tree on top that will grow alongside your new bub?

Apartment living. No where to bury it.

#4 DragonsGrace

Posted 22 March 2016 - 01:06 PM

Maybe check with a local pathology practice. We have to dispose of unneeded tissue every day so they may be able/willing to do that for you. No guarantee of course, I don't think it has ever come up at my company but they happily took my clexane needle containers and disposed of them for me



#5 Acidulous Osprey

Posted 22 March 2016 - 01:14 PM

Ask the midwives.  They should know.

#6 greenthumbs

Posted 22 March 2016 - 01:19 PM

Any way of burning it? Campfire somewhere?

Don't see why it couldn't go in the bin though. First of all, who's gonna know? (except us of course), and secondly, people throw out dead animals (rats, etc) often enough.

#7 Soontobegran

Posted 22 March 2016 - 01:45 PM

View PostCallMeFeral, on 22 March 2016 - 12:55 PM, said:

Really the bin is illegal? I'd have thought given period products and meats go in there it would be ok.

How about the old bury it in the garden and plant a tree on top that will grow alongside your new bub?

The placenta is regarded as human tissue so it can't be binned unfortunately.

OP there are safe burial practices that I would have thought the midwife would be able to advise you about but if you have nowhere to bury it perhaps you have a friend or family member who can do it for you.




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