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My husband wasted his vote


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#51 Loore

Posted 29 June 2016 - 05:50 PM

View Post~Jodama_Feral~, on 29 June 2016 - 02:20 PM, said:

The fine is $20. It would cost me more to go out and pretend vote than pay it if I decided not to vote.

I always assumed it was a really heavy fine.  I'm surprised its only $20!

#52 aluminium

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:00 PM

View Post~Jodama_Feral~, on 29 June 2016 - 02:20 PM, said:

The fine is $20. It would cost me more to go out and pretend vote than pay it if I decided not to vote.
I was fined $50 for not voting once (I was living O/S and didn't realise there was an election, think it was a state one).

#53 gravity1

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:02 PM

I was fined $50 a few years back now as well!

#54 MrsLexiK

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:02 PM

I missed an election as I was in hospital in the emergency room high on morphine. I got a please explain, if you don't or we don't like your answer we will s be you a $179 fine.

#55 ZombieFerretOfDoom

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:14 PM

View Postkatpaws, on 29 June 2016 - 05:23 PM, said:

I'm working on the election this year and looking forward to the penis votes. Last time i worked on an election, the erection count was quite high (that is people voting by drawing a penis on their ballot paper). I think the penis scored more than some candidates.

He became PM didn't he?



OP, I'd be mad as hell too. Voting is an important right and not one that should be taken lightly. And giving your vote to Hanson or anti-vaxxers "as a joke" just gives a great big middle finger to everyone who actually gives a crap about who runs the country.

If you vote for those parties because you believe in their policies, fine. I won't have a very high opinion of you, but at least you're voting for what you believe in. Doing it as a joke and running the risk of being the deciding vote that gets them over the line is just inexcusable.

#56 ZombieFerretOfDoom

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:16 PM

View PostLoore, on 29 June 2016 - 05:50 PM, said:

I always assumed it was a really heavy fine.  I'm surprised its only $20!

Fine is different depending on if it's local, state or federal.

#57 IkeaAddict

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:17 PM

Does he whinge about politicians? Because voting like that kinda rules out being able to whinge about them. So does donkey voting or putting a non-filled in ballot paper in the box.

#58 TheWanderer

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:21 PM

View PostIamtheMumma, on 29 June 2016 - 04:03 PM, said:

Its bloody huge.

Welcome to a double dissolution election.  Twice as many seats up for grabs means many more candidates than usual.

#59 seepi

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:25 PM

At least you will be able to blame him for the next 3 years when politicians do stupid things or we have a hung parliament and nothing happens.

We had a footballer go into politics in Canberra - he got in with loads of votes, then turned out to be a hard core religious type and criminalised abortion among other things.

I did some joke votes when I was 18, but I got over that by my second election.

#60 Poke

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:36 PM

My husband works with developing countries with the aim of getting them to have fair democratic elections. He sees violence and intimidation, blaitant corruption, ballot rigging, arson and 'poll capturing'. Even when things are going well the physical barriers to voting can be immense in some countries. But lots of these places still have huge turn outs. I always get a bit emotional when he talks of the lines of woman patiently waiting predawn for the polls to open so they can cast their vote.
Australians are so lucky and I think it is really sad that we often don't recognise the responsibility that comes with that.
I'd be p*ssed off too op. I'd also be reminding him he no longer has the right to complain about any government policy or program until after the next election.

#61 IkeaAddict

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:37 PM

View Postseepi, on 29 June 2016 - 06:25 PM, said:

At least you will be able to blame him for the next 3 years when politicians do stupid things or we have a hung parliament and nothing happens.

We had a footballer go into politics in Canberra - he got in with loads of votes, then turned out to be a hard core religious type and criminalised abortion among other things.

I did some joke votes when I was 18, but I got over that by my second election.

I drew a picture of a cat on my first election voting paper not realising that it would nullify my vote. Just a cute cat sitting at the top of the form. Oops

#62 SplashingRainbows

Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:39 PM

Slightly OT but on the theme of incompetent immoral pollies ...

I'd like to see mandatory education and ongoing accredited professional development for politicians.

I work in a profession and lose many weeks of professional time each year updating formal qualifications and dealing with "red tape". On the whole, I am glad I have to do these things and I understand the better qualified the professions the better off we all are.

I'd like to see the people who continue to increase my red tape though be required to be competent at their roles and maintain competence.

If I stuff up I'm liable to my professional bodies (multiple), and my client at a bare minimum. I can be sued, reprimanded, limited in my ability to operate in the future or kicked out. Fair enough.
I'd like to see even a smidgen of that responsibility directed back to our pollies. You put in an over budget second rate NBN - you get sued, you lose your job, you get reprimanded.

#63 MiSS_E

Posted 29 June 2016 - 07:00 PM

View PostIkeaAddict, on 29 June 2016 - 06:17 PM, said:

Does he whinge about politicians? Because voting like that kinda rules out being able to whinge about them. So does donkey voting or putting a non-filled in ballot paper in the box.

One could argue that voting correctly means the person has accepted the current democratic system and recognises that the outcome may not reflect their own personal choices, therefore they also have no right to whinge about it when the other guy gets in.

Or y'know, people can whinge about whatever the hell they feel like...democratic freedom and all that.

#64 MrsWonka 2.0

Posted 29 June 2016 - 07:13 PM

View PostIkeaAddict, on 29 June 2016 - 06:37 PM, said:

I drew a picture of a cat on my first election voting paper not realising that it would nullify my vote. Just a cute cat sitting at the top of the form. Oops
I work routinely for AEC at election polling booths...as long as your intention to vote was clear I don't see how a cat would nullify your vote.  Unless it was in one of the boxes.

#65 Lady Sybil Vimes

Posted 29 June 2016 - 07:30 PM

View PostMrsWonka 2.0, on 29 June 2016 - 05:41 PM, said:



I have followed his feed on facebook for a while and like his stance on the need for change in our justice system.  Some of the stories he presents just boggle the mind.  So many families unnecessarily grieving through failure to detain those who intend nothing but harm.
Worth a read if you've not done so before.  And I just couldn't vote for those that called me a double dipper (who I previously supported) nor those who took $1B of our money to not build a road.....

Thanks for responding. He's not someone I'd vote for but it's interesting to hear what appeals about him for others.

#66 Also sprach

Posted 29 June 2016 - 07:40 PM

The problem with Derryn is that he states he has never voted but now expects people to vote for him.  So essentially, he is a load of hot air.

#67 Nobody Cool

Posted 29 June 2016 - 08:03 PM

View PostPoke, on 29 June 2016 - 06:36 PM, said:

My husband works with developing countries with the aim of getting them to have fair democratic elections. He sees violence and intimidation, blaitant corruption, ballot rigging, arson and 'poll capturing'. Even when things are going well the physical barriers to voting can be immense in some countries. But lots of these places still have huge turn outs. I always get a bit emotional when he talks of the lines of woman patiently waiting predawn for the polls to open so they can cast their vote.
Australians are so lucky and I think it is really sad that we often don't recognise the responsibility that comes with that.
I'd be p*ssed off too op. I'd also be reminding him he no longer has the right to complain about any government policy or program until after the next election.

I think about these kind of things while I am waiting in line to vote every time we have an election and it always makes me teary.

We take so much for granted... That we can wait safely in line without risk of harm, that we are free to vote for whoever we want without fear of reprisals, that we can give a sassy eye-roll to the Christian Democrat supporters waving their "how to vote" cards in our faces, that we can hang around and have a chat to the people running the sausage sizzle afterwards. And that we are free to whinge about the election results without fear of imprisonment.

We have no idea how lucky we are.

#68 Feral_Faylie

Posted 29 June 2016 - 08:10 PM

View PostIkeaAddict, on 29 June 2016 - 06:37 PM, said:

I drew a picture of a cat on my first election voting paper not realising that it would nullify my vote. Just a cute cat sitting at the top of the form. Oops

It doesn't.  DH has worked counting votes the last few elections, he said as long as the numbers are there and legible then it's all good.  He likes the ones with  ranty bit of writing on them, he's not had any penis votes.

#69 Madeline's Mum

Posted 30 June 2016 - 11:46 AM

I honestly never knew that MPs or Senators were paid per vote! I just looked it up and it's $2.62 per first perference vote for this election. That has the potential to be a huge money maker for certain candidates!

I would also also be really unhappy with my husband if he did that. My husband doesn't give a flying fig about politics and used to vote liberal when I met him. Slowly he has seen the light and votes Greens now.

#70 just roses

Posted 30 June 2016 - 11:58 AM

View Postred_squirrel, on 29 June 2016 - 01:12 PM, said:

Pauline Hanson has a very good chance of getting in.

You should get him one of their Tshirts and make him wear it everywhere. Then he can explain himself to everyone that asks.
I'd have liked to see everyone on the Sunshine Coast responsible for Clive Palmer forced to wear his campaign t-shirts. Apparently, no one own up for voting him in!

#71 Mister Mum

Posted 30 June 2016 - 12:03 PM

This always amused me:

"The trouble with democracy is that every silly b*st*rd gets a vote."

- Arnold Rimmer

#72 Hypnic Jerk

Posted 30 June 2016 - 12:06 PM

View PostLouiseA1, on 29 June 2016 - 01:04 PM, said:

You have to let it go. Voting is an individual thing. Just worry about your own

Maintain the rage I say!

#73 la di dah

Posted 30 June 2016 - 12:28 PM

View PostMadeline, on 30 June 2016 - 11:46 AM, said:

I honestly never knew that MPs or Senators were paid per vote! I just looked it up and it's $2.62 per first perference vote for this election. That has the potential to be a huge money maker for certain candidates!

For parties it doesn't go to the particular MP, just the party. It affects even the big parties a fair bit, as in their case a lot of money is involved, and for small parties it can make a difference for being able to do any projects/campaigning/letterboxing etc.

It is a good reason to give first preference to somebody you actually like, even if you have to give 2nd preference knowing they're likelier to win.

It's also a way to support even in an area where you may not have much expectation of your party having a chance.

You get no funding if you're under 4% in the state vote though. This is a case where every 1st preference DOES count - not just winning/losing. If the scummy racist parties don't crack 4% they don't get the funding and they're out of pocket. If they do crack 4% they get the money for each first preference vote they got.

Another reason to be annoyed with OP's husband - not just for the money itself but at helping them hit funding threshold.

#74 HRH Countrymel

Posted 30 June 2016 - 12:32 PM

I would be utterly furious with him too.

If he wanted to be an ill informed idiot then that was his moronic right.  

But the moment he TOLD you about it, he turned it into a problem.

For you.

Because you have now found yourself in the position of knowing you are married to an idiot.

Sheesh... I'm not sure I could come back from that one...

#75 archyandmehitabel

Posted 30 June 2016 - 12:52 PM

View PostLouiseA1, on 29 June 2016 - 01:04 PM, said:

You have to let it go. Voting is an individual thing. Just worry about your own

It's an individual thing to be a irresponsible fool?  I would not be letting it go. I would hate to know that I was married to such an effwit.

View PostFomoJnr, on 29 June 2016 - 01:15 PM, said:

Absolutely. I have very little interest personally in politics, and always just ask DH who to vote for.

We're forced to vote. You can't expect everyone to vote the way you do.. Not you specifically OP, just people in general.

But I get the shock factor.

:omg: My bold.  I honestly didn't know that any woman would do something like this in the 2000s or admit to it like it isn't a problem.  FFS, put in a blank vote if you really can't be bothered to form your own opinion. Don't just spout your husband's and give him two votes.  Just as irresponsible as the OP's husband.




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