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Do you involve your kids?


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#51 niggles

Posted 02 July 2016 - 04:45 PM

I involve them as much as they show interest. So my 8 yr old walked down with me to vote and asked who I would vote for and why. And I told her that I would vote Green because I trust them to look after people and the planet. She then looked around interestedly wondering who else was voting Green. She's fairly impressionable at this age so I try to give reasons for why I do and do not support people/ideas.

#52 Bone Apple Tea

Posted 02 July 2016 - 04:55 PM

I took my 11 year old with me and let her watch how I filled out the ballot paper.

Then had a discussion with her about why I voted the way I did.

#53 pili-pala

Posted 02 July 2016 - 05:34 PM

I answer questions, in a way that she can understand. I also explain the budget to her (although she tends to lose interest). She is vaguely interested.

We never spoke of politics growing up. DH is extremely uninterested.

#54 Lou-bags

Posted 02 July 2016 - 05:51 PM

My DS is not quite 3, but yeh I told him that I had to go and vote today (Nanna watched him as DH was working and I'll be buggered if I was going to stand in line to vote with a bored 2 and something yo runner, least of all when I'm 28 weeks pregnant and my SPD has flared up!).

He said "what's vote?"

So I explained as simply as I could- about the people who run the country and how we choose them.

"what's a country?"...
"Australia, sweety".....
"Is this Australia?".....
"Yes"....
"Is it like Darwin?"...
"Um no, Darwin is part of Australia, just like Perth- where we are now"...
"We're going to Darwin on a plane!" (we are, next week, he's excited).
"Yep"
"I'm hungry Mummy"
"Ok DS, good chat! Let's eat"

Yeh, I don't think he's ready yet!

#55 TwiceThe Woman

Posted 02 July 2016 - 05:54 PM

Politics is right up there with oxygen for us.
We love discussing all things political - and we don't all agree.
Having lived and travelled in fascist states, we are committed to remaining informed and democratically self-determined, particularly for the wellbeing and security of future generations.
Australia has had it so good for sooooo long after the mid 1960's, we can too easily take our standard of living for granted.
Every election day, our family makes a toast to our democracy.
Our DD + 4 DS grew up with political awareness and considerations  to be relished.

Edited by TwiceThe Woman, 02 July 2016 - 06:06 PM.


#56 IShallWearTinsel

Posted 03 July 2016 - 12:05 AM

View Post~Jodama_Feral~, on 01 July 2016 - 06:40 PM, said:



See I dont get this.

Sure kids are kids but they are smart and capable of great understanding on many topics. Some adults would benefit from listening to kids at times.

But then no topic is off the menu at our place, we discuss everything open and honestly.

Same here.
DD 6yo discussed it a bit. But she wants me to be prime minister cos I'm generous with the pocket money lol

#57 Feral rocketdog

Posted 03 July 2016 - 01:22 AM

View PostFloralArrangement, on 01 July 2016 - 05:17 PM, said:

If they ask, yes we do. DH and I also discuss politics around them. Our older two are over 18 now.

When I was a child, parent and grandparent made a big deal of it and keeping secret who they voted for. Never got that. They all were fond of making a big deal of not letting children over hear stuff, most not a big deal and children should be seen and not heard at the dinner table. We parent very differently.

My family was the same. Somehow I assumed we were Labor voters (probably as dad was blue collar, we seemed low income). I remember the Hawke/Keating transfer for power and the GST election of 1993, so maybe it was because I grew up in the longest Labor governing period of Australian history.

Later, my dad supported One Nation, at which point I realised he'd probably been a Liberal voter. Even now, my mother won't discuss who she votes for. It's weird. How else do you indoctrinate your children? ;)

#58 TinCat🐱

Posted 03 July 2016 - 11:35 AM

Quote

How else do you indoctrinate your children? ;)

DS9 asked me last night how come everyone else doesn't realise the blue team are mean?

#59 liveworkplay

Posted 03 July 2016 - 11:56 AM

Yes, always. Actually last night I was sitting watching Le Tour de France and DD1 (12) was watching the election coverage on her ipad. She is very very keen to be able to vote. She even informed me that you can enroll from 16 in readiness for when you turn 18.(which is correct, I checked the AEC site)

I thinknitb8s very important for kids to understand how their world works. I am always very humbled when lining up to vote thinking of all those people around the world who risk their lives yo do so or do not havevthe privilege. We discuss how privileged we are to have the right to peacefully vote as well.

#60 horsehead

Posted 03 July 2016 - 06:48 PM

DS is the only person in my extended family who will discuss politics with me. Everyone else gets all weird and backs out of the conversation when I bring it up.

I have been so keen for political discussion this week and it drives me mad that people around me aren't interested. Thankfully there were a few people at work who were happy to join in conversations with me even if our views didn't align.

#61 foom

Posted 03 July 2016 - 09:52 PM

Unless prepolling we always take our son with us and I explain the mechanics of the process, etc. I was saying to DH tonight how this was another feature of a Saturday vote - many people can take their kids and it normalises that voting and caring about who you vote for is an important part of our society. But I guess they only get that lesson if the parents are taking it seriously.

We discuss topics around him but I must admit I steer clear of stuff I don't feel like explaining. Like marriage equality. But if he asked I'd try to discuss it at a level he understands.

Sadly we are raising a cynic. I didn't realise just how cynical we are about politics until it came out of his mouth.

He sat and watched the ABC with us last night till an hour after bedtime. He went to be seriously unimpressed that there wasn't a result known by then.

#62 Paddlepop

Posted 03 July 2016 - 10:15 PM

I measured the senate ballot paper against DD. Does that count? :shrug:

#63 **Xena**

Posted 03 July 2016 - 10:17 PM

View Postliveworkplay, on 03 July 2016 - 11:56 AM, said:

Yes, always. Actually last night I was sitting watching Le Tour de France and DD1 (12) was watching the election coverage on her ipad. She is very very keen to be able to vote. She even informed me that you can enroll from 16 in readiness for when you turn 18.(which is correct, I checked the AEC site)

I thinknitb8s very important for kids to understand how their world works. I am always very humbled when lining up to vote thinking of all those people around the world who risk their lives yo do so or do not havevthe privilege. We discuss how privileged we are to have the right to peacefully vote as well.

Yep, I enrolled to vote at 16 :)

#64 siemp

Posted 04 July 2016 - 05:36 PM

We celebrated DS3 s (he's 2) first federal election.

Asked him who he wanted to vote for "blue, red or green?"

He responded with "put in rubbish bin"

I'd say he's got it Sussed




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