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Would you sleeve at 34 BMI


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#1 ShelbyP

Posted 28 June 2017 - 10:09 PM

If you had tried everything and had a bunch of comorbidities and chronic joint pain?

And would it work?

#2 AdelTwins

Posted 29 June 2017 - 12:26 AM

No, I wouldn't. I had a BMI of 35 on the day I delivered my twins. I ate so much to keep up my milk supply that I didn't really lose that much weight. BMI was still 32 a year later. 26 a year after that, then 24 the following year.

I'm pregnant again (3rd trimester) and it's 32-33 at the moment. This pregnancy is straight after a loss at 19wks, which I didn't lose the weight from. I know what's ahead of me - at least two years of trying to eat healthier and slowly build up the exercise again. I can do it. Can't say that I'm overly happy about the process, but I owe it to my kids (& myself) to be healthy and fit.

The joint pain may lessen as you lose weight. Gentle walking and swimming would be great starting exercises.

ETA - I also cut out one crap food at a time. So rather than jump into a crazy food diet, I simply got rid of one, then another. So much easier to stick with.

Edited by AdelTwins, 29 June 2017 - 12:30 AM.


#3 halcyondays

Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:24 AM

Yes, if weight loss would help the chronic pain. I would try saxenda first.

#4 Beqa

Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:31 AM

There are a lot of people with a sleeve who have a BMI higher than that. The sleeve stops them eating enough not to have a BMI of 60, but they are still obese.

I suppose you just need to be really  clear why you are overweight. If your excess calories come from eating calorie dense food or fluid, a sleeve will allow you to be overweight or obese. People have told me that after their sleeve they can't eat an entire steak, but can easily eat a family bag of crisps.

People I know who have had success from a sleeve have an exercise regime and very carefully track and monitor their intake of food. They still have food issues, their brain did not become that of a naturally thin person who can maintain a normal weight without too much thought.

I suppose the ideal situation for a sleeve would be constant hunger even when eating very large portions of healthy foods.

#5 Pearson

Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:40 AM

But would the doctor?

#6 cinnabubble

Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:58 AM

Last time I had a BMI of 35 I could still run for the bus. Are you sure that a doctor would do bariatric surgery on such a relatively low weight?

#7 ShelbyP

Posted 29 June 2017 - 07:04 AM

They will with comorbidities. I have chronic weight related joint pain- no running and barely any walking actually, which makes the weight harder to budge.

Cholesterol is 7.5 and prediabetic.

Weight loss yo yo attempts for the past 4 years and just keep climbing.

I guess I'm wondering if it'll actually work. If I lose 25kgs, I'll be a healthy weight, but most people who get sleeves lose that just as a starting point. It would be disappointing to go through surgery and the costs to only lose 5-10 kgs.

#8 cinnabubble

Posted 29 June 2017 - 07:11 AM

Dumb question, but isn't how much weight you lose to some extent down to you? Isn't surgery more like a tool that you use to facilitate weight loss?

#9 Handsfull

Posted 29 June 2017 - 07:50 AM

Yes it would help your medical comorbidities.  In fact sleeve is proven to be effective at that BMI very successfully.  PM if you wish to chat.

#10 blondie82

Posted 29 June 2017 - 08:04 AM

I had a band put in at a BMI of 35. I lost 22kgs. Should probably drop another 10 or so but wine loves me too much.

The surgery, the follow up from the doctors, nurses, dietitians all helped me achieve my goal. I had the surgery 3 years ago and I still have follow up visits to keep on track.

When I went in for the initial consult, the surgeon said I was on the lower end of the BMI scale but coupled with back surgery (which had me put on weight) he wasn't too concerned.

Good luck op.

#11 Crazyhouseholdof6

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:39 AM

I had the sleeve last year with a slightly higher BMI and have zero regrets. Please don't think it's the easy way out though. It's tough every day making good choices and remembering not to eat and drink at the same time, remembering to wait half an hr between food and liquid, finding out what foods (if any) make you dump.. the first two months post op were absolutely horrendous. I regretted it each minute of every day but all of a sudden it got better. There are numerous doctors in Brisbane who will operate with that BMI but ship around as prices vary greatly. Now my only wish was that I'd done it 5 years earlier. Good luck!!

#12 Soontobegran

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:45 AM

View PostFormaggio, on 29 June 2017 - 07:04 AM, said:

They will with comorbidities. I have chronic weight related joint pain- no running and barely any walking actually, which makes the weight harder to budge.

Cholesterol is 7.5 and prediabetic.

Weight loss yo yo attempts for the past 4 years and just keep climbing.

I guess I'm wondering if it'll actually work. If I lose 25kgs, I'll be a healthy weight, but most people who get sleeves lose that just as a starting point. It would be disappointing to go through surgery and the costs to only lose 5-10 kgs.
I am not sure that <35 BMI will get you a sleeve despite comorbidities.
It certainly wouldn't have qualified the people I know in Victoria who've had a sleeve.

#13 2004member

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:57 AM

To get a sleeve don't you have to do Optifast for a few weeks prior to surgery? If so, why not try that now and see what happens?

#14 ShelbyP

Posted 29 June 2017 - 04:31 PM

View PostSoontobegran, on 29 June 2017 - 09:45 AM, said:


I am not sure that <35 BMI will get you a sleeve despite comorbidities.
It certainly wouldn't have qualified the people I know in Victoria who've had a sleeve.

I've contacted 2 surgeons in vic. They'll do me with 2 comorbidities. I'm technically 34.6bmi so it wouldn't take much to reach 35.

Obviously this is a last resort.....menopause has not helped.

#15 FiveAus

Posted 29 June 2017 - 04:54 PM

Have you tried Weight Watchers? After 10 years of yo yo dieting, I've successfully lost 20 kgs in just over 6 months by sticking to the WW plan. I haven't been hungry, the only exercise I've done is walking and I'm very, very happy with what I've achieved. I've gone from a size 18 plus to a size 12. And its now for life. I can do this, I really like the food I eat, my meals are a good size and for the first time ever, I'm eating the correct proportions of the different food groups.

#16 ShelbyP

Posted 29 June 2017 - 05:40 PM

WW is just another diet or reduced calorie plan. They're all cheatable without willpower.

#17 liveworkplay

Posted 29 June 2017 - 05:44 PM

No. I had a BMI just under that 7 weeks ago. By combining a low carb diet and strength based exercise I have decreased it to 29 so far.

#18 bikingbubs

Posted 29 June 2017 - 05:50 PM

No i wouldnt.  I have been obese (since lost 40+kg) and no surgery/pills/diet will work until you are ready and commited to making the change.

If you are serious about it, 80% of weight loss is what you eat. Try something like swimming or aqua for non weight bearing. I would try that for a good 4/5 months before deciding on major surgery

#19 liveworkplay

Posted 29 June 2017 - 05:57 PM

View Postbikingbubs, on 29 June 2017 - 05:50 PM, said:


If you are serious about it, 80% of weight loss is what you eat. Try something like swimming or aqua for non weight bearing. I would try that for a good 4/5 months before deciding on major surgery

This is so true. Find a plan that suits you (I have tried a lot with varying success but the low carb is by far the easiest) The CSIRO has a new low carb book out which is meant to be good.

#20 Jax12

Posted 29 June 2017 - 05:57 PM

It depends.  How long have you been overweight?  How many times have you lost and regained?  Is it likely that weight loss is going to help reduce your physical pain? Improve your mental wellbeing?

BMI isn't a super accurate measure of weight and health, so I think drawing the line in the sand at say, 35 being "acceptable" but 34 not is a bit ridiculous.  It's more contextual than that.

In my opinion, people who haven't been sleeved or haven't had a close friend/family member sleeved are more likely to tell you not to, try something else, "just eat less and move more" etc etc.  And people who have been sleeved will tell you to go for it.  So you're really unlikely to ever get purely objective opinions.

It's a very personal decision that should be weighed up by the pros and cons of your specific situation (pun intended).

Good luck with whatever you decide.

#21 unicycle

Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:17 PM

View PostFormaggio, on 29 June 2017 - 05:40 PM, said:

WW is just another diet or reduced calorie plan. They're all cheatable without willpower.
A school mum I am close to found her sleeve was Cheatable, too.

#22 liveworkplay

Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:18 PM

Quote

In my opinion, people who haven't been sleeved or haven't had a close friend/family member sleeved are more likely to tell you not to, try something else, "just eat less and move more" etc etc.  And people who have been sleeved will tell you to go for it.  So you're really unlikely to ever get purely objective opinions.

I have a close family member who has had it done. After initially losing a small amount of weight, she has regained and put more on. When you still eat high fat/sugar foods, abet less of them, you will still put on weight.
The only difference between what I am doing and someone with a sleeve is that I have to mentally portion control my intake where as the sleeve physically does. Choosing what to put in requires the same willpower with both methods.

Diet is everything.

Edited by liveworkplay, 29 June 2017 - 06:20 PM.


#23 FiveAus

Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:22 PM

View PostFormaggio, on 29 June 2017 - 05:40 PM, said:

WW is just another diet or reduced calorie plan. They're all cheatable without willpower.

So is bariatric surgery. Pavlova goes down easier than vegetables apparently.

#24 Jax12

Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:56 PM

View Postliveworkplay, on 29 June 2017 - 06:18 PM, said:

I have a close family member who has had it done. After initially losing a small amount of weight, she has regained and put more on. When you still eat high fat/sugar foods, abet less of them, you will still put on weight.
The only difference between what I am doing and someone with a sleeve is that I have to mentally portion control my intake where as the sleeve physically does. Choosing what to put in requires the same willpower with both methods.

Diet is everything.
Absolutely.  Hence my first questions.  

People are different.  I like to drink and can often drink to excess which I later regret. But then there are times I can easily abstain for long periods of time and it doesn't consume me.  I would never compare my relationship with alcohol to someone with long-term alcohol dependency or abuse issues.  Same goes for food.  Some people struggle their entire life with food and are always going to battle making those right choices. The sleeve is a tool. Damn straight you can gain weight even with it.  For some people though, it's the difference between putting on 5kg or 20kg in the same time span.  Cognitive willpower is a finite resource and there's often a rebound effect...restrict, restrict, restrict...crap I messed up, what the hell, let's go nuts while I'm in this "bad" period and eat aaaaaaaalllll the food before I have to be "good" again.  Sometimes a physical restriction is necessary.  So while that's the "only" difference between what you're doing and what someone with a sleeve is doing, it's a pretty significant difference.

I'm not saying the OP should go for it and I'm not saying she shouldn't.  I'm saying it really depends on her particular situation.

#25 ShelbyP

Posted 29 June 2017 - 06:57 PM

Well, the thing is, all this 'try this, try that' has been done for the past X number of years to death. At some point you have to say that diet, exercise ( which I can't do due to pain plus all the experts say it's 80% food) and willpower are not working.

Do you accept that your chronic pain which is daily lowering your quality of life can potentially be solved with surgery, or do you listen to all the well meaning advice and keep trying pointless and ineffective diets for 5 more years while you get fatter and more debilitated by pain?




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