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Would you sleeve at 34 BMI


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#26 FiveAus

Posted 29 June 2017 - 07:00 PM

View PostFormaggio, on 29 June 2017 - 05:40 PM, said:

WW is just another diet or reduced calorie plan. They're all cheatable without willpower.

It's actually not "low calorie" or less food. I've done WW before, god I've done everything at least once, and this time I've found it's easier, I'm not hungry, I'm not constantly thinking about food and I'm not counting calories.
But it IS a whole change of lifestyle and mindset. Now I eat decent sized meals that are filling, healthy and don't contain much in the way of processed food. And its not low carb, I hated low carb.

#27 limakilo

Posted 29 June 2017 - 07:15 PM

I am considering it and have had basic talks with my GP.
I want my quality of life back.
I have ligament damage that prevents me exercising to the extent that I want to, and I have had one surgery so far and am waiting on another. I am in pain most days.
Weight loss would help with all of that.
My Dad died of heart disease and I want to have a healthier outlook for my health. I am also struggling to conceive and know that any weight loss will help.
There are lots of members on here that have been sleeved, and I can't think of one that has said they regret it, even the ones that had a really rough time.

#28 teaspoon

Posted 29 June 2017 - 07:34 PM

Apparently the gastric balloon achieves 20kg weightloss .... rather than invasive surgery, could be worth a look at.

#29 SCG23

Posted 29 June 2017 - 07:55 PM

Hopefully, my following comments are helpful.

I had a BMI over 33 ear'y this year and looking down the barrel of diabetes with family members either pre-diabetic or diabetic. I had sore joints, pretty much all of them.

I have lost over 25 kg in not quite 6 months with around 5 more to go. And, the only walking I did/do is incidental; I do not actively exercise although now I have lost almost as much as I aimed to, I plan to be more active.

I admit to having gained weight simply by overeating unhealthy foods and not exercising.

The only surefire way for me to lose weight is to eat healthier food (minimal processed foods and mostly made from scratch) and to keep to a total number of calories that mean less energy consumed than is used.

I have times when I eat a meal and feel like I am still starving hungry. I need to eat a lot to feel full so I make sure I fill up on veges and include protein and a bit of fat for satiety. I usually only eat 3 meals a day.

Having read how some people have got around the sleeve by eating crisps and the like, the crux of the matter is, how much do YOU want to lose the weight and keep it off? There's no point in having the surgery if you're going to cheat "the system" (sleeve). It is possible to lose the weight without surgery.

Losing weight HAS to be a lifestyle change and a change of mindset, not just a diet but a different way of viewing food.

I have struggled with yo-yo dieting for years and have finally come to the realisation that I can eat any type of food, none are "good" or "bad", as long as they are just as treats "sometimes" or included in a calorie controlled way.

I think only you know what it is you are prepared to do to lose the weight.

I also recommend some form of support. The My Fitness Pal website has a great forum (just like this one) where you can read Success Stores and get advice on losing and maintaining weight. It is a motivating place to visit but you have to be ready to make the changes permanently.

I wish you the best of luck. :)

Edited by SCG23, 29 June 2017 - 07:57 PM.


#30 Soontobegran

Posted 29 June 2017 - 08:16 PM

View Postteaspoon, on 29 June 2017 - 07:34 PM, said:

Apparently the gastric balloon achieves 20kg weightloss .... rather than invasive surgery, could be worth a look at.

The gastric balloon is not always well tolerated unfortunately. I know someone who had one in and back out again after 6 days due to sensation of having a foreign body blown up inside her that made her vomit constantly. $6k down the gurgler

#31 2004member

Posted 29 June 2017 - 08:20 PM

Try this https://www.youtube....h?v=UY-xuw0bEAM

It's a weight loss meditation. I was skeptical but I can feel it working and the best thing is it is free.

#32 Soontobegran

Posted 29 June 2017 - 08:21 PM

View PostFormaggio, on 29 June 2017 - 04:31 PM, said:



I've contacted 2 surgeons in vic. They'll do me with 2 comorbidities. I'm technically 34.6bmi so it wouldn't take much to reach 35.

Obviously this is a last resort.....menopause has not helped.
Sounds awful.
It must sound weird but in my 'circle' I have 5 people who've been sleeved in Victoria by the same surgeon and having a BMI >35 and needing at least 35 kgs to lose was a must.
Great results though if you'd like to PM me I could see if he is one you've been referred to.

#33 ShelbyP

Posted 29 June 2017 - 08:28 PM

I've done my fitness pal a million times . None of this is new. Seriously, when I say surgery is a last resort, I'm not kidding.

#34 SCG23

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:01 PM

View PostFormaggio, on 29 June 2017 - 08:28 PM, said:

I've done my fitness pal a million times . None of this is new. Seriously, when I say surgery is a last resort, I'm not kidding.

What is the reason for your BMI being so high?

Is it because you consume more calories than you use?

There are heaps of reasons why people eat too much, because, at the end of the day, it's mainly eating too much that causes us to gain weight.

if a Gastric Sleeve is your last resort, I say Go For It. But, if you are going to continue consuming more calories than your body needs, you'll keep the weight on regardless.

I truly wish you the best of luck in the decision you make because being overweight, obese or worse is hard.

Edited by SCG23, 29 June 2017 - 09:03 PM.


#35 cardamom

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:04 PM

View PostFormaggio, on 29 June 2017 - 08:28 PM, said:

I've done my fitness pal a million times . None of this is new. Seriously, when I say surgery is a last resort, I'm not kidding.

It sounds like your mind is made up OP, I'm not sure what you're hoping to gain from this thread? Your doctor is best placed to tell you whether this is likely to work well for you, rather than randoms on EB who don't know you or your medical history.

I completely agree with PPs though who have said that a sleeve is 'cheatable' and you need to be mentally ready. Rather than a diet - which rarely work, I'm totally with you on that one! - have you ever thought about seeing a psychologist to talk through some strategies around eating? For me that's the only thing that's ever helped to create lasting change, getting to the root of my eating triggers and learning ways to manage it. It doesn't work all the time but it certainly made a significant difference.

Wishing you the best of luck. Wander over to the Lots to Lose thread if you ever want some support :)

#36 Ducky*Fuzz

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:15 PM

Is hydrotherapy a possibility? It's not as harsh on your joints.  I did this for a while when I was suffering from bad back and shoulder pain.

At the moment I'm trying more water and cutting back to only 2 coffees per day. In the holidays I'm committing to making some other changes.

Personally, I'd do all I could before I would resort to surgery, but it sounds like you've done a lot already.  Good luck with your decision.

#37 TheGreenSheep

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:24 PM

My friend had a band inserted at a BMI of 34, and she is very happy with the results.

#38 kpingitquiet

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:49 PM

No. I think I'd seriously examine my diet, perhaps transitioning to a mostly plant-based diet for at least a restorative period (getting blood sugar stable, cholesterol down), and look into aquatic exercise and gentle exercise designed to support joints. Much like I'm doing at 40 bmi, minus the co-morbidities.

#39 Froyo

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:54 PM

Have you tried seeing a registered dietitian?

#40 ShelbyP

Posted 29 June 2017 - 09:56 PM

Yes, yes and yes.

#41 Soontobegran

Posted 29 June 2017 - 10:08 PM

Formaggio I have chronic pain, I am on some pretty serious medications too so I understand those that make it very hard to keep your weight stable. I have had 2 knee replacement in the last 18 months and now need both hips and a spinal fusion but as I have a neurological pain condition I am doing all I can to put these off for as long as I can.
I was referred to a rehab place by my pain team where I do hydrotherapy and physio twice a week which has a twofold effect of improving my core fitness very gently but also losing weight and keeping it off despite my medications.
Being in the water is total bliss. Is this something you could be up for?

#42 galba

Posted 29 June 2017 - 10:11 PM

Hi

I was sleeved almost 4 years ago. BMI of 35 with NO co-morbidities.  I was tired - tired of losing and gaining the same 30kgs. I tried all the diets that I could including diet pills and they would work!  I would do Zumba, body balance, yoga or pilates and loved it. Then, 6 months later I would fall off the wagon and it would all go back on. EVERY single year of my adult life.

For me, being overweight didn't impact on my personality or my confidence - I still loved me. But I wasn't healthy and simply couldn't get healthy on my own.

With the sleeve I lost 40kgs and have kept them all off. I have a BMI of 23 now, food is not the main focus of my life and I make much healthier food choices.

I tried doing it on my own, I admitted to myself that I couldn't do it and got help.

#43 für_elise

Posted 29 June 2017 - 10:21 PM

You shouldn't cheat nature, it's not worth it! my boss had this surgery a few years ago (he's in his 50's) and it worked for a while but he has since piled on the kgs due to a busy lifestyle always on the go, and just recently had surgery that bypasses his stomach but he's experienced complications and is suffering the repercussions and has had to undergo additional surgery to assist with recovery. It certainly is not an easy fix nor is it a definite fix. Really the best way to go is to modify the diet and incorporate some exercise. Any kind of surgery is surgery, so pretty serious!

#44 Soontobegran

Posted 29 June 2017 - 11:02 PM

View Postfür_elise, on 29 June 2017 - 10:21 PM, said:

You shouldn't cheat nature, it's not worth it! my boss had this surgery a few years ago (he's in his 50's) and it worked for a while but he has since piled on the kgs due to a busy lifestyle always on the go, and just recently had surgery that bypasses his stomach but he's experienced complications and is suffering the repercussions and has had to undergo additional surgery to assist with recovery. It certainly is not an easy fix nor is it a definite fix. Really the best way to go is to modify the diet and incorporate some exercise. Any kind of surgery is surgery, so pretty serious!
Cheat nature ?
Let me guess.... You are not and never have been obese?
Bariatric surgery actually will become the norm. Prevention of the outcomes of morbid obesity is far cheaper than caring for the morbidly obese, I believe it is ornly a matter of time before it is available in the public system.
An obese person has 95% chance of never being slim by traditional methods of dieting and whilst prevention of obesity would be the ideal it is not going to happen in the near future.

Gastric sleeve does work for many people, it does not work for everyone but there are thousands of people out there now living a wonderful life that they wouldn't have had pre sleeve.

Edited by Soontobegran, 30 June 2017 - 07:42 AM.


#45 Kafkaesque

Posted 29 June 2017 - 11:14 PM

So much subtle judgement in this thread. Why is bariatric surergy so frowned upon? No one takes on surgery with out serious consideration. It's expensive and scary so I doubt there is anyone that is just too lazy to eat right and are choosing the easy option.

OP if you are comfortable with it then go for it! Yes it can be "cheated" but for most people there is significant weight loss that is maintained.

#46 AsperHacker

Posted 29 June 2017 - 11:32 PM

View PostJax12, on 29 June 2017 - 06:56 PM, said:


Absolutely.  Hence my first questions.  

People are different.  I like to drink and can often drink to excess which I later regret. But then there are times I can easily abstain for long periods of time and it doesn't consume me.  I would never compare my relationship with alcohol to someone with long-term alcohol dependency or abuse issues.  Same goes for food.  Some people struggle their entire life with food and are always going to battle making those right choices. The sleeve is a tool. Damn straight you can gain weight even with it.  For some people though, it's the difference between putting on 5kg or 20kg in the same time span.  Cognitive willpower is a finite resource and there's often a rebound effect...restrict, restrict, restrict...crap I messed up, what the hell, let's go nuts while I'm in this "bad" period and eat aaaaaaaalllll the food before I have to be "good" again.  Sometimes a physical restriction is necessary.  So while that's the "only" difference between what you're doing and what someone with a sleeve is doing, it's a pretty significant difference.

I'm not saying the OP should go for it and I'm not saying she shouldn't.  I'm saying it really depends on her particular situation.

If your drinking alcohol and can often drink to excess then I don't think you're opinion is valid. Nor do I think you're not an alcoholic.  Same as me. That's a whole lot of messed up thinking in that post right there.

It's so not about 5 or 20 kgs. Same as it's not about drinking 5 or 20 drinks.

Cognitive resources are finite... only to the point where you're not willing to expand them.

I wouldn't sleeve at 34 BMI only because I'd hope (and life wise and genetically I 'shouldn't' need to) but, if I thought, really thought, it was my best option, then I would.

#47 kpingitquiet

Posted 29 June 2017 - 11:45 PM

View PostKafkaesque, on 29 June 2017 - 11:14 PM, said:

Why is bariatric surergy so frowned upon? No one takes on surgery with out serious consideration. It's expensive and scary so I doubt there is anyone that is just too lazy to eat right and are choosing the easy option.
For me it's mostly about the friends I've seen pile the weight back on after surgery because they hadn't dealt with underlying psych issues that were leading them to self-sabotage in myriad ways. So it wound up being a very expensive and risky way to do the same thing they'd done in past efforts. And then from friends who were extremely set on permanent change with the sleeve but then had horrible complications. Now, there are success stories in my circle, too, but they are fewer, by far. She asked if we would do it and I just wouldn't.

#48 FiveAus

Posted 30 June 2017 - 05:38 AM

I know three people who've had it, lost a fair bit of weight then put most of it back on. They didn't have the willpower they needed to stick to the right food choices.. One of them drinks a fair bit so that didn't help.

I know a couple of others who've had it and successfully kept the weight off. But they have also changed the way they think about food, and have stuck to a healthy and moderate eating plan, which would have seen them lose the weight anyway.

My daughter-in-law is an anaesthetic nurse at a large hospital. We were discussing this subject last week. She said she sees more things go wrong and more returns to the operating theatre from bariatric surgery than from anything else.

#49 MarciaB

Posted 30 June 2017 - 06:22 AM

OP - obviously seek medical advice and opinion first and foremost.

I do agree with something a PP suggested and wanted to re-iterate. Before any WLS, my understanding is that you will be asked to do a very low calorie diet ( Optifast or similar - around 800cal a day) for a week or two. Could you ask your dr or a dietician to supervise you through this as a trial period to see how you go? It might help you get started on a weight loss plan, or at least you will then know what is in store.  Best of luck to you.

#50 Soontobegran

Posted 30 June 2017 - 07:47 AM

View PostFiveAus, on 30 June 2017 - 05:38 AM, said:



My daughter-in-law is an anaesthetic nurse at a large hospital. We were discussing this subject last week. She said she sees more things go wrong and more returns to the operating theatre from bariatric surgery than from anything else.
Perhaps it's more of a reflection on the surgeon and the hospital because this is not the norm.
If she is talking about gastric bands being removed in favour of a sleeve the yes...... But most surgeons do not recommend bands anymore because of this.




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