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Trees to screen neighbours


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#1 Chicken Penang

Posted 06 September 2017 - 10:14 PM

My neighbours are knocking down and rebuilding. Due to restrictions, the house is next to our backyard and will be two storey. I am designing our garden and would love any ideas for trees to plants near the boundary to screen and maintain some privacy. The garden will have hedges along the fence line. I am thinking of magnolia little gem. Any other ideas?
I hope to be here for many years so I am happy to be patient.

Edited by ms mel, 06 September 2017 - 10:15 PM.


#2 Sui-yat

Posted 06 September 2017 - 10:17 PM

I planted teddy bear magnolias on our back fence line to screen the neighbours. They look great. I imagine the little gem magnolias would work well too.

#3 SukieTawdry

Posted 06 September 2017 - 10:32 PM

Bamboo is fast growing and you get a lot of screening, quickly, for little money.

#4 Gudrun

Posted 06 September 2017 - 10:45 PM

Lilli Pilly

#5 laridae

Posted 06 September 2017 - 11:12 PM

If you want something tall - pencil pines. We have one directly between our neighbours window and our front garden. It's taller than their house (which is set higher than ours). We didn't plant it though so I don't know how long they take to grow.
You can also get some apple trees that grow straight up. They look pretty cool.

Edited by laridae, 06 September 2017 - 11:13 PM.


#6 Feral Grey Mare

Posted 07 September 2017 - 04:58 AM

My neighbour has camellias growing as a tall hedge screening her yard from the double storey house on the other side. They always look beautiful, whether in flower or not and can be kept trimmed.

#7 Ozquoll

Posted 07 September 2017 - 05:43 AM

I like pittosporums; you can grow them quite closely together and keep them well trimmed for a traditional hedge look, or I have seen them grown more widely spaced and only rarely trimmed, providing more of a light screening effect rather than a solid hedge - the leaves and branches moved beautifully in the wind, it really did look lovely.

Edited by Ozquoll, 07 September 2017 - 05:44 AM.


#8 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 07 September 2017 - 06:51 AM

I second bamboo.

Make sure you get clumping not running and it won't take over.
They have varieties for all climates.

We had a huge monstrosity built by developers on our fence line and have had great success with Oldhammii and gracilus.

#9 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 07 September 2017 - 07:09 AM

We had some tall skinny ornamental pears at our old house. They went in as fairly large trees and screened our 2 storey neighbour within 2 years. They a particular type that stayed tall and narrow without much pruning. Very lovely.  Deciduous though, but in warmer climates they don't always drop their leaves, and would definitely be green for longer than a magnolia.

#10 itsallnew

Posted 07 September 2017 - 02:40 PM

We have a hedge of jasmine and it grows like crazy here in Brisbane. We cut it back quite severely and it just comes back bushy as ever very quickly. It screens our neighbours easily.

#11 magnanimous

Posted 07 September 2017 - 02:41 PM

Camellias for sure.

#12 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 07 September 2017 - 02:55 PM

What will grow best will be determined by how much sun/shade it will get, and what sort of climate and soil you have.

We have a tall, thick virburnum hedge on our north boundary. It looks great, especially right now with bright green new growth coming on. All it needs is a bit of a trim a few times a year. In a previous house we planted cottonwoods along a fence - they have grown fast and tall and look great (well, last time I went to visit my old neighbours anyway). I see cottonwoods used for screening quite a lot - they can get very tall or can be pruned to stay more manageable.

I recommend talking to your local garden centre - some will have a horticulturalist on staff who could give you a great recommendation for your local conditions.

edited for spelling

Edited by 22Fruitmincepies, 07 September 2017 - 02:56 PM.


#13 Rilee's~Mama

Posted 07 September 2017 - 02:58 PM

Please don't plant bamboo. Please. The neighbour over my back fence did this, assured me it was clumping bamboo, would be no problems. Yeah right ..... it's popping up on my side of the fence, the bamboo on her side is actually pushing the new fence towards my yard it's gotten that thick! She's thinned it out, but that won't stop it growing on my side of the fence.

#14 Gumbette

Posted 07 September 2017 - 02:59 PM

 SukieTawdry, on 06 September 2017 - 10:32 PM, said:

Bamboo is fast growing and you get a lot of screening, quickly, for little money.

That's what we're in the process of planting.  Just make sure they're 'clumping' bamboo and not 'runners'.  Ours were $65 for a 1/2 metre plant.

#15 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 07 September 2017 - 04:08 PM

 magnanimous, on 07 September 2017 - 02:41 PM, said:

Camellias for sure.

Camellias are beautiful and make a great hedge. But they can be really slow growing. Really really slow. We had a 'hedge' or them planted at our old house and after 2 years they had barely grown at all. Especially the ones on the shady side.

#16 me-n-b

Posted 07 September 2017 - 05:09 PM

Depends on your climate, but I like murraya/mock orange and Radermachera ‘Summerscent’ - both fast growing, hardy and have scented flowers.
I have heard of good things about the lilly pilly 'neighbours be gone', but it is too dry and rocky for lilly pillys here - they survive but grow really slow and stay small.
Also love camellias and virburnum.

#17 spr_maiden

Posted 07 September 2017 - 07:06 PM

Bamboo is a real pain for neighbours even if it's clumping variety.  The constant leaf dropping which smothers grass is a massive pain. Our LLs planted some trees along all the fencelines and those  sharing the fence with the bamboo on the other side have barely grown at all.
We've lived next door to bamboo twice and same thing with both places.  Dead grass, constant raking and stunted trees near the bamboo. If you want your neighbours to like you, don't choose bamboo.

#18 notsoretro

Posted 07 September 2017 - 08:16 PM

You may find that any windows which overlook your property are required to be highlight windows or frosted glass. Check with your council. Will you also get to comment on the DA?

#19 jayskette

Posted 08 September 2017 - 05:33 PM

depending on how big or little your yard is make sure the placement of your blocking plants wont cause neighbour to lodge orders with the council to chop it down due to obstruction of solar access

#20 laridae

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:50 PM

 jayskette, on 08 September 2017 - 05:33 PM, said:

depending on how big or little your yard is make sure the placement of your blocking plants wont cause neighbour to lodge orders with the council to chop it down due to obstruction of solar access
I think only Queensland has laws against blocking solar access.

#21 Christmas tree

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:56 PM

This - they are hardy, fast growing and require very little care.

Re camellias - I love basically all flowering plants except camillias. They are horrible messy plants that drop their flowers en mass and that you then need to tidy up or they rot. I have no idea why I hate them so much but I do. And we have seven scattered around our property.! They are also pretty slow growing.  But is is possibly I am biased given my dislike of them

 Ozquoll, on 07 September 2017 - 05:43 AM, said:

I like pittosporums; you can grow them quite closely together and keep them well trimmed for a traditional hedge look, or I have seen them grown more widely spaced and only rarely trimmed, providing more of a light screening effect rather than a solid hedge - the leaves and branches moved beautifully in the wind, it really did look lovely.





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