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what is the best pain relief straight after c section spinal wears off?


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#26 *Lena*

Posted 05 November 2017 - 08:50 AM

Don't let them scare you. Everyone is different. My SIL had me terrified of a c-section and after 38 hours labour in I went for my first one and I was scared. I didn't think it was so bad.

I have had 4 sections in 5.5 years. Each one I had different pain management. The best was when they have me an injection in my scare after having my baby.
Each time my midwives were on top of it and were bringing me more pain meds before I thought I needed them.

#27 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 05 November 2017 - 08:51 AM

 TrixieBelden, on 05 November 2017 - 08:46 AM, said:

Lucky mummy I think you mean TAP blocks - tiny plastic catheters stitched in usually after a laparotomy and local anaesthetic is given down them.  If you google csection and TAP blocks you can read about them.

Yeah, that sounds about right, I am sure she said it lasted 24-48 hours.

Anyway, I wasn't the patient or the Dr, but might be worth asking your obs about it OP if it's not standard procedure.

Edited by LuckyMummy ♥♥, 05 November 2017 - 08:58 AM.


#28 Soontobegran

Posted 05 November 2017 - 08:53 AM

 WaitForMe, on 05 November 2017 - 08:31 AM, said:

I don't think thats entirely accurate.

When I raised concerns I may have pushed things too fast, an OB said something along the following to me: "We stitch you up really tight because we know you'll be wanting to be able to tend to your baby. If you had the same surgery for any other reason, there is no way you would be up and about as soon as you are for a c/sect".

I did not mention anything about sewing up but it is the reason surgeons prefer the pfannenstiel incision (bikini line) because there is less trauma on the abdominal muscles and better healing etc.
Obstetricians say all sorts of random things to their patients about their needlework.
I have had several major abdominal surgeries and cared for many more.....they are up out of bed in the same time frame as a C/S mum though. No rest for anyone these days.

Edited by Soontobegran, 05 November 2017 - 09:01 AM.


#29 Soontobegran

Posted 05 November 2017 - 08:57 AM

 TrixieBelden, on 05 November 2017 - 08:46 AM, said:

Lucky mummy I think you mean TAP blocks - tiny plastic catheters stitched in usually after a laparotomy and local anaesthetic is given down them.  If you google csection and TAP blocks you can read about them.

Oh I misunderstood lucky mummy ......unfortunately TAP are not common in C/S but a syringe full of lignocaine is.
I will edit. :)

#30 Loore

Posted 05 November 2017 - 08:59 AM

I didn't really have a lot of pain with either of mine.  I was given morphine until the morning after they were born and then pretty much just panadol  and nurofen after that, I don't recall anything stronger being on offer but I'm sure that if I needed more it would have been.

#31 Cocoa Trufflespice

Posted 05 November 2017 - 09:15 AM

I've had 2 c-sections.
First was after a 24 hour labour with failed forceps and ventouse. I was up and about quickly. I honestly didn't feel much pain at all. Yes, I had to be careful with I moved around but it certainly wasn't bad at all. I was on panadol and voltaren only from day 2.
Second c-section was planned. I was kept in bed for 24 hours that time and I honestly think that's what made the recovery slower. I had endone, voltaren and Panadol.
It was still a great recovery but I do remember thinking it was more painful than the first time.
If I have a third I will be asking to get up and moving earlier.
Good luck with it all OP, I hope you have easy recovery.

#32 Mpjp is feral

Posted 05 November 2017 - 09:30 AM

 Sparkles66, on 04 November 2017 - 11:25 PM, said:

I had tramadol, endone and panadol

I had this plus morphine initially. Morphine made me horribly ill.

I was over medicated and after a couple of days refused the endone and tramadol. I went to Panadol  and neurofen which managed the pain absolutely fine.

I had an emergency cs with no labour. Everyone experiences pain differently of course but I found it completely manageable and not at all distressing. I found the engorgement pain in my breasts more intense than cs pain.

#33 Lallalla

Posted 05 November 2017 - 10:01 AM

I don’t remember getting a choice, with my 1st (an emergency) I was given some kind of long lasting opioid that was once a day and endone, which did sweet F&$k all, so they doubled the dose and then I couldn’t sit up because the dose was enough to take out a horse (so says my nurse MIL and GP FIL), so was delayed by a day getting out of bed. Which was far from ideal. They switched me to tramadol after that and it worked much better.

To say I was apprehensive the 2nd time around (a scheduled c-section) is an understatement. They gave me fentonil with a button to press when I needed more (rather than relying on the midwife to come with my pain relief on time without prompting). It was great. I can’t remember the timeline exactly but I switched to tramodil after 24 hours or so and then went home with panadeine.

#34 born.a.girl

Posted 05 November 2017 - 10:38 AM

 Feral Grey Mare, on 05 November 2017 - 05:10 AM, said:

Don't you just love people who tell you how bad everything is going to be?



Unfortunately the other 50% of complains are: why don't they tell you these things beforehand?

#35 Caitlin Happymeal

Posted 05 November 2017 - 10:43 AM

I was given brufen after mine - the morphine from the epi made me a bit icky so I assume that's why?

I didn't have a great experience - not much pain assessment going on when I was in... which as a first time mum (twins into the bargain, so trying to respond to double the crying/feeding/pooing) was really awful. Even if I pressed for assistance they were hit and miss attending to my call bell - quite understaffed from memory. So I basically got my regular brufen and panadol and that's about it. Which is also what I was sent home on. Inadequate, but I guess they had their reasons. I wasn't in copious amounts of pain, but more than just nurofen/panadol kinda pain. Bit frustrating. Could have done with an endone I think.

Anyway, that was before I was an RN. I wish I knew then what I know now!! My word, so many pain meds available for so many types and severities of pain! You can have a discussion now about it, but until you are in the moment you probably wont know how bad its going to be - it might be ok and you might be right with fairly basic stuff or you might have a worse time than others and need more. Your OB should be writing up a few options - like a PP said - and your mids will be responsible for working out what the best option is. They don't always just throw opioids at you as a first line of defence.

#36 born.a.girl

Posted 05 November 2017 - 10:48 AM

 WaitForMe, on 05 November 2017 - 08:31 AM, said:



When I raised concerns I may have pushed things too fast, an OB said something along the following to me: "We stitch you up really tight because we know you'll be wanting to be able to tend to your baby. If you had the same surgery for any other reason, there is no way you would be up and about as soon as you are for a c/sect".

I'm always vaguely amused by 'don't lift anything heavier than the baby', given it's not an option to not do that.  With that sort of surgery for something else, you'd be told to not lift anything for a while.

I know there's no solution, and your comment is interesting in that light.

#37 PocketIcikleflakes

Posted 05 November 2017 - 10:52 AM

Mine were both pretty good pain wise. I will say though that I healed much better after the first. Musky I'd day because it was the first major surgery, it was more straight forward and I "only" had a newborn to look after afterwards. I also though had less effective (affective?) pain relief and was very aware of if I was pushing myself too much. Second time round it was so effective I just carried on as normal. This did me no favours in the long run. I needed a bit of pain to remind me that running after a 3 year old was not a good idea. Not bad pain, just a decent ache would have been helpful. So if you do get pain free after name sure you're surrounded by people who remind you that while you perfectly capable of doing stuff that it may not do you favours in the long run.

Good luck, I hope you have a lovely experience meeting your baby :)

#38 RochelleRochelle

Posted 05 November 2017 - 08:09 PM

First time around (emergency c-section after 12 hrs of active labour) I had Endone and Tramadol. Second time (planned c-section) I had Targin and Tramadol and was offered Endone but only had it a couple of times because I didn’t like how it made me feel (spaced out and weak). Targin was really good, very slow release with no noticeable side effects. Both times I was discharged with Tramadol and also told to take neurophen and panadol if necessary. I barely took any Tramadol and didn’t really feel the need for neurophen or panadol after a few days of being home. Definitely felt better a lot faster after the elective section compared with the emergency one.

#39 Flimsy*But*Fun

Posted 05 November 2017 - 08:46 PM

Tramadol was my BEST!  I'd live on that stuff if I could.  Sadly, I haven't had it since my last c/sec 11.5yrs ago :smile:




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