Jump to content

GA C-Section


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Bendersmum

Posted 28 November 2017 - 01:37 PM

I've been watching a maternity doco (think an Irish version of One Born Every Minute) on YouTube and a random question popped into my head that I thought to myself EB might be able to answer that for me ...

Why is it that if you have a GA for a C-Section your birth partner can't be present as opposed to if you have a spinal block or epidural?

#2 Soontobegran

Posted 28 November 2017 - 01:51 PM

Because it is more confronting to see your partner unconscious and intubated than awake and engaged with you.

#3 AdelTwins

Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:00 PM

I almost passed out during my second c section - medicine issue. DH was getting extremely worried. He would have also been in the way if something major happened.

#4 Bendersmum

Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:00 PM

Ah. And here I was thinking it must be some limitation of liability issue.

Thanks!

#5 HRH Countrymel

Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:06 PM

View PostSoontobegran, on 28 November 2017 - 01:51 PM, said:

Because it is more confronting to see your partner unconscious and intubated than awake and engaged with you.

Indeed.

As my sister (who works in medicine) will say "Yeah, you tell people 'You'll go to sleep and when you wake up it will all be over..' but anaesthetised people don't actually look like they are 'sleeping' they look like they are dead.."

Not an image a new father needs burned in his brain..

#6 TrixieBelden

Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:33 PM

At my hospital the partner is in the anaesthetic bay (the room attached to the theatre) so he's with the woman right up until she is wheeled into theatre.  The midwife can bring the baby to him very early, and he is brought into theatre if the baby needs resuscitation.

#7 Mrs_greyhound

Posted 28 November 2017 - 03:09 PM

Yep, intubated patients don't look like they're having a blissful snooze. I think it's the taping of the eyes that really gives the spooky effect. Likewise the anaesthetist needs to be closer to the airway while someone is intubated and sedated. So there's not really anywhere suitable for the dad to hang out while the surgery takes place.

#8 eilca

Posted 28 November 2017 - 03:39 PM

My husband was brought into theatre for my 2 c-s under GA, after I had been put out to it.  Not sure if it is still allowed.

#9 TrixieBelden

Posted 28 November 2017 - 03:45 PM

Yes I believe some places allow it once the anaesthetic is underway - I think on the basis that the most dangerous bit (anaesthetics are very safe) is induction when the initial drugs are given and the patient is intubated. You don't need relatives hanging around at that point asking 'what's that? Why have you pressed that button that says 'emergency'?' etc.

#10 Soontobegran

Posted 28 November 2017 - 03:49 PM

View PostTrixieBelden, on 28 November 2017 - 02:33 PM, said:

At my hospital the partner is in the anaesthetic bay (the room attached to the theatre) so he's with the woman right up until she is wheeled into theatre.  The midwife can bring the baby to him very early, and he is brought into theatre if the baby needs resuscitation.

That is pretty much standard now thankfully.

#11 Soontobegran

Posted 28 November 2017 - 03:55 PM

View Posteilca, on 28 November 2017 - 03:39 PM, said:

My husband was brought into theatre for my 2 c-s under GA, after I had been put out to it.  Not sure if it is still allowed.

It happened a couple of times where I worked.....usually if the partner was medically trained and got permission from a private obstetrician and due to some unfortunate experiences it was just an across the board no afterwards. There may be some places that are still okay with it though.

There is not enough staff to help comfort and go to the medical aid of a partner not coping so whilst I do understand that it just doesn't seem fair it isn't because they want to spoil the fun.

#12 Treasure Island

Posted 28 November 2017 - 03:59 PM

I was told its because they are there to support the mother so if the mother is not awake the dad isn't in the room. Also mine was an emergency so I think they just didn't want him there. I thought it was a silly explaination though cause they still get to see the baby born.

#13 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 28 November 2017 - 04:07 PM

Fortunately it didn't happen but I remember asking this question 27 years ago. I actually felt that if our baby couldn't have the support from his mother I wanted the early cuddles to be from dad - not some stranger.

#14 Bendersmum

Posted 28 November 2017 - 05:00 PM

I can totally see the rationale for it now you've all explained it. My DH says I'm not very glamorous while I'm sleeping so I can't imagine I'm exactly an oil painting while I'm under a GA!

#15 MrsLexiK

Posted 28 November 2017 - 05:31 PM

We were told it had to do with dad/supportperson being the second support to the baby. In a normal csection with epi or spinal the baby can have two support people the midwife and dad (or other person) however due to the risks of GA they only allow one support person for the baby.


#16 Lallalla

Posted 29 November 2017 - 11:48 AM

View PostAnon100, on 28 November 2017 - 04:07 PM, said:

Fortunately it didn't happen but I remember asking this question 27 years ago. I actually felt that if our baby couldn't have the support from his mother I wanted the early cuddles to be from dad - not some stranger.
This did happen to me and the early cuddles were from their dad, the second the paediatrician had cleared the twins the midwife swaddled them and wheeled them out to my partner who was just outside. They then spent 2 hours doing skin to skin with him until I was well enough to see them (2 hours is not standard, it had to do with my own heath complications)

#17 Bwok~Bwok

Posted 29 November 2017 - 12:38 PM

I've aspirated twice during surgeries (not to do with c/s)!

From what they explained to me, you aren't fully intubated under GA for minor surgeries, but when an emergency happens - like mine - is that the drugs they give you causes your body to fully spasm so they can fully intubate you quickly.

When I woke up, it felt like I pulled every muscle in my body, I had wet my pants and had a chipped tooth. So I don't think it would be an experience someone needs to see IF it happens.

Edited by Bwok~Bwok, 29 November 2017 - 12:39 PM.


#18 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 30 November 2017 - 06:15 AM

My BIL attended my sisters emerg GA CS but that was because he was an Allied Health Professional and had spent the prior year observing surgeries (related to his work) so knew what to expect in terms of the anaesthetic.

He was allowed to film..... until everything went bad (reason she was having GA). Then they requested he stop recording as they saved my sisters life (she ended up in ICU for 5 days after baby was born) and that of the baby.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.