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So I just discovered you can’t walk with an epidural...


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#26 SeaPrincess

Posted 03 January 2018 - 06:35 PM

View PostJingleflea, on 03 January 2018 - 04:07 PM, said:

The thing with birth is, you have NO IDEA what you'll really want or how you'll feel until you're there.

So true!

I absolutely did walk around after both of my epidurals, which were both for inductions. I walked up and down the halls of the hospital trying to get things moving. Didn’t work. With one, I was able to pee normally, but the first time, it was uneven and ultimately my bladder was drained using a catheter. It was inserted, drained and removed, so not constantly in place.

Talk to your doctor and find out what the normal process is.

#27 Wonderstruck

Posted 03 January 2018 - 06:38 PM

View Postharmonic_wizz_fizz, on 03 January 2018 - 04:22 PM, said:

OP


What STBG said - you need to talk to your OB / midwife about such things - some hospitals do walking epis and some dont. If you have to be induced due to some reason, which is always a possibility, you may not be able to walk around anyway depending on which way it is done. Please try not to stress about it, ideally its great to have no interventions but its not always possible and they arent the end of the world.

This 100% - prior to labour and throughout the pregnancy I told my OB that epidural and c section were my last resorts as I was so scared of the whole needle in spine thing and recovery.

I bought a tens machine and planned a natural birth, didn’t even educate myself on c-sections much.

Had bad back pre-labour for half the Friday night which meant I got little sleep - it stopped for the day.

On Saturday night it ramped up again from about 10.30pm - didn’t take the gas till lunchtime on Sunday or later - I had spent the whole time on my feet as I had bad back labour, I walked and paced. Cue a few hours later and despite breaking my waters I’m not progressing so the OB wants to start a drip - it’s late in the arvo and I’m running on the limited sleep I had on Friday night/Sat morning.

I had the epidural- I could finally get off my feet and rest a bit - the drugs meant I then progressed quickly and tried pushing. They turned down the epidural for pushing and I was starting to feel it - I was also exhausted, couldn’t have pushed without it.

In the end I had to have an emergency c-section so they gave me a stronger epidural- the first one I could feel my legs and move them, the second I was numb.

I hated that I couldn’t walk and had a catheter but I was stuck in bed longer than I should have been due to blood loss. Most people are up the next day/that day depending on when it’s done etc.

That said, I battled for ages and it was agony and I was exhausted. It was 100% worth facing my fear of a needle in the spine.

I was also scared of the recovery from a c-section - I had a really bad bleed 2.5lt and needed a night in ICU but was up walking by Tuesday (she was born Sun night) and home on Friday - so I need not have worried so much!

Take it how it comes, you may not need one but if you do you have the option.

#28 Silverstreak

Posted 03 January 2018 - 09:34 PM

I really, really loved my epidural. I ended up in labour for 17 hours and by the time I got to the epidural I'd tried pacing around, stomping my feet, gas, pethidine and water injections (wasn't allowed in shower or bath due to being monitored.) Ended up with a c-section, but was up and moving the next day, although bent over a little!), and bouncing around a couple of days later. I'd definitely keep that option open.

#29 NeedSleepNow

Posted 03 January 2018 - 09:42 PM

For medical reasons I needed one prior to even starting the induction with my third baby. It was amazing, and so different to my other two deliveries. It was pretty patchy and didn’t work at all in one area, but it was still a much better experience than my previous births. I was able to control the dose, and always kept it low enough that I could have walked around. This was against hospital policy though, so I was confined to a bed. I had to have a catheter for other reasons anyway, so it really didn’t worry me. When I look back on the birth, and how calm and relaxed it was, I’d definitely opt for another if we go for number 4.

#30 savannah_8

Posted 03 January 2018 - 09:55 PM

My epidural was a Godsend and I would get one in a instant again. Not being able to walk was not an issue for me as long as they took away that pain. Bliss

Edited by savannah_8, 03 January 2018 - 09:55 PM.


#31 savannah_8

Posted 03 January 2018 - 09:57 PM

Can I ask the medical reason you needed one?  I’m intruged. if we have another baby I want to ask for one before the induction starts also

View PostNeedSleepNow, on 03 January 2018 - 09:42 PM, said:

For medical reasons I needed one prior to even starting the induction with my third baby. It was amazing, and so different to my other two deliveries. It was pretty patchy and didn’t work at all in one area, but it was still a much better experience than my previous births. I was able to control the dose, and always kept it low enough that I could have walked around. This was against hospital policy though, so I was confined to a bed. I had to have a catheter for other reasons anyway, so it really didn’t worry me. When I look back on the birth, and how calm and relaxed it was, I’d definitely opt for another if we go for number 4.


#32 Feral Grey Mare

Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:09 PM

I had one with my first pregnancy and it was a Godsend. I found walking, all fouring and showering were not possible so the epidural was a huge relief. I ultimately had to have an emergency c/s so having the epidural in place made this so much simpler. The only down side is that 22 years later I still have limited feeling in my middle toe as a result of a slip up during the epidural.

#33 flowermama

Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:22 PM

I was pressured into having an epidural with DD1 by my obstetrician and I hated it - I couldn’t move anything below my waist and felt completely trapped in my own body. DH had to move my legs for me and I had no idea when I was having contractions. With DD2, I said flat out no epidural; even so they tried to persuade me as DD2 was posterior and had a big head so it was a long and difficult labour. I much preferred not having an epidural but having said that, I’ve got friends who think they’re the best thing to ever happen to childbirth 🙂. As a PP said, it’s hard to know how you’ll feel and what’ll work for you so I’d recommend knowing your options and go in with an open mind.

#34 BECZ

Posted 03 January 2018 - 11:06 PM

I was induced with my first (at 40+3) with an epi from the start, due to strict instructions from my neurologist.  My seizures were out of control, hence the induction, but as tiredness brings on my seizures, it was done before I felt anything.  As there were a few emergencies my midwife had to leave the room and go and help out for 20 minutes.  In that time, things finally started moving and when he got back it was definitely time to push.  So they didn't get to turn the epi down and I actually didn't feel a thing.  I really struggled to tell when I was having a contraction.

My two boys were breech and were delivered by c-section.

I was meant to have another c-section with DD2, but ended up with an unplanned homebirth.  I actually don't know how bad the pain was as I was too worried about what else might go wrong as due to my seizures, I'm meant to be observed from the start of labour and it was also a VBAC, which they were a lot more concerned about back in those days.  Not sure if this made it a worse experience or actually helped take my mind off the pain.

All the best OP, and just be prepared to go with the flow, as as much as we try and plan things, it doesn't always work out that way.



#35 MooGuru

Posted 03 January 2018 - 11:14 PM

I intended to be really active in labour. I did active pregnancy and pilates classes throughout pregnancy (right up to the day before labour). I requested the big exercise ball and had visions of me waddling around, the occasional dance moves and bouncing on the ball etc etc.
When the time came: in early labour I was super comfortable sitting on the end of the bed one leg ticked under me the other hanging off the bed. Any movement away from that position and contractions ramped up considerably.
Once the labour picked up like pp's I  became very internalised. I couldn't talk, couldn't walk and only felt safe (only way I can describe it) lying down on my side. Anytime I tried to get up I'd feel sick, like I'd faint and stressed.

I didn't have an epi at all so no idea on that but yeah for me, as someone who very much wanted an active birth, being able to get up and walk around was a really minimal part of my actual labour.

#36 Babetty

Posted 04 January 2018 - 09:00 AM

I'll just echo other PP's and say it's important to mentally keep your options open and don't get your heart set on an epi or any particular approach. Both my labours were so fast there wouldn't have been time for an epi even if I wanted one.

Similarly with my first labour I spent most of the time in the shower and gave birth in there. I fully expected similar for my second, but when it came round to it I refused to move off the bed and gave birth on my back. Which should have been terrible with posterior presentation and no painkillers, but was just fine for me (I wasn't anti painkillers, just never quite got to the stage where I felt I needed them)

#37 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 04 January 2018 - 09:14 AM

View PostBabetty, on 04 January 2018 - 09:00 AM, said:

I'll just echo other PP's and say it's important to mentally keep your options open and don't get your heart set on an epi or any particular approach. Both my labours were so fast there wouldn't have been time for an epi even if I wanted one.
This was the case for me. Prepped for an epidural for my first but it never actually happened as I transitioned into pushing. Everything went faster for my second birth, no opportunity for an epidural even if I wanted to.

How much you feel like walking will depend greatly on how the birth is going, what feels comfortable for you at the time, and how you deal with the contractions. Some women like to walk a lot, others don't.

Keep your options open.

But if you think you want to be able to walk after an epidural, talk to your dr/midwife/hospital now to find out if that's even possible in your birthing centre.

#38 PrincessPeach

Posted 09 January 2018 - 09:10 PM

View PostPumpkinSpice, on 03 January 2018 - 03:40 PM, said:




Haha, I just thought I’d probably prefer give birth not lying down...

I planned the same thing, and had the midwives originally agree. Except atthe pointy end of things I had to flip over & ended up delivering both of mine laying down. It was done to slow things down and to reduce stress on my baby.  Even laying down I still had a 15 minute & 10 minute second stage - much faster than my ob would have liked.




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