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Recycling becoming unviable


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#26 *Nasty*Squeekums*

Posted 31 January 2018 - 09:39 PM

View PostOzquoll, on 31 January 2018 - 08:48 PM, said:

What would he use to pick the meat out of the cabinet though? My butcher said having tongs for every different cut was too fiddly, and if they use their bare hands they have to go scrub them to avoid cross-contamination, so it is much easier for them to use the plastic bag to pick the meat up, then just turn it inside-out so the meat is inside the bag.
I much prefer they use the bag simply on the cross contamination aspect

Hands, even in gloves or tongs leave to much room for error imo
Gloves id expect changed every different cut of meat so thats actually more rubbish in long term

#27 Silver Girl

Posted 31 January 2018 - 09:55 PM

This thread is enlightening. Our council recently replaced our 120L recycling bin with a 240L one after I advised them the smaller one wasn’t big enough.

Our landfill bin is 120L and rarely fills up. I was quite proud of this, but am now taking notes to reduce our overall waste including recyclables.

View PostFlamingoG, on 31 January 2018 - 09:07 PM, said:



I shouldn’t have read this thread, every day my trip to the shops leaves me in despair over the amount of packaging on bloody everything. We just had a few days on the coast, and there was not one single person with reusable bags. These are people who see the plastic waste on their beaches daily, but still aren’t making that connection. And don’t even start me on straws - true depth of misery there.

I heard that 30 tourism operators in Cairns and Port Douglas have pledged to ban straws:

https://www.google.c...article/9371478

#28 Silver Girl

Posted 31 January 2018 - 10:01 PM

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 31 January 2018 - 09:34 PM, said:

Our council specifies that all waste must be contained in plastic bags before going in the rubbish bin. Is this usual or them being wasteful/lazy?

Our council stipulates that recyclables are not in plastic bags, except for flexible plastics which do need to be in plastic bags tied at the top.


#29 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 31 January 2018 - 11:10 PM

View PostSilver Girl, on 31 January 2018 - 10:01 PM, said:



Our council stipulates that recyclables are not in plastic bags, except for flexible plastics which do need to be in plastic bags tied at the top.

Yes, ours also says recycling not in plastic bags, while rubbish in plastic bags.

#30 born.a.girl

Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:30 AM

View PostOzquoll, on 31 January 2018 - 08:48 PM, said:

What would he use to pick the meat out of the cabinet though? My butcher said having tongs for every different cut was too fiddly, and if they use their bare hands they have to go scrub them to avoid cross-contamination, so it is much easier for them to use the plastic bag to pick the meat up, then just turn it inside-out so the meat is inside the bag.

I know, it remains to be seen.

I think this is a case of finding new ways to do things that don't involve a plastic bag. There must be someone smart enough out there to do that.

I've not done it yet with the containers, firstly because we don't eat much meat, and secondly the few plastic bags we do get, get reused as dog waste bags.

Which is, of course, another topic - the environmental impact of pets.

I can't actually remember back to my childhood when butchers didn't use plastic bags.

#31 born.a.girl

Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:33 AM

View PostFuture-self, on 31 January 2018 - 06:57 PM, said:

I made a complaint (nicely) to a company recently abput the absolutely ridiculous amount of packaging they use to post products. Soft tube of mosisteriser wrapped in tissue paper and put in a cardboard box. Carboard Box then wrapped in another layer of tissue paper. Then that placed in a bigger box that was filled with soft pellets. AND then in a postage bag . I was appalled.

Their response? It's all recyclable (not the postage bag) like somehow that was the magic fix.


I actually stopped using a Jurlique skin product that was fantastic on my face (SPF rated moisturiser).  When I contacted the company about the fact that it was in a ceramic container rather than recylable plastic, I was told that 'some councils are a bit slow to pick up on the fact that there are recycling options for ceramics ...'.

Where to start unpacking that one?

Sure there are, but not profitable ones, not ones where a human can pick one item out of the recycling and send it in the right direction, and finally it's not the freaking council's problem, it's the manufacture's.  Haven't bought it since.

#32 born.a.girl

Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:36 AM

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 31 January 2018 - 09:34 PM, said:

Our council specifies that all waste must be contained in plastic bags before going in the rubbish bin. Is this usual or them being wasteful/lazy?

I've heard others say that their council specifies landfill must be in plastic bags, so it doesn't spill over the street during collection, but have never heard it from our council.

#33 Nobody Cool

Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:40 AM

View PostFuture-self, on 31 January 2018 - 06:57 PM, said:

I made a complaint (nicely) to a company recently abput the absolutely ridiculous amount of packaging they use to post products. Soft tube of mosisteriser wrapped in tissue paper and put in a cardboard box. Carboard Box then wrapped in another layer of tissue paper. Then that placed in a bigger box that was filled with soft pellets. AND then in a postage bag . I was appalled.

Their response? It's all recyclable (not the postage bag) like somehow that was the magic fix.

I would love to see some sort of enforceable legislation around excessive packaging but I know it will never happen.

#34 born.a.girl

Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:47 AM

View PostMarigoldMadge, on 31 January 2018 - 09:26 PM, said:

Our local butcher is cashless - they handle the meat only.

There are butchers out there who will use clean hands or utensils to handle the meat.

See video at: https://gippslandunw...o-what-you-can/

Yes, the Cannings ones are in Melbourne, too.

No card, no meat.  Doesn't bother me as I use card for everything, but don't know how many are put off by it.

#35 Sentient Puddle

Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:54 AM

View PostIlliterati, on 31 January 2018 - 08:48 PM, said:

People manage without single use plastic bags at Aldi check outs. Most don't even use the reusable plastic bags. People adjusted just fine to access the cheaper prices and Aldi model so there is no reason this can't be the same in other supermarkets? That problem at least then is not a hard one. If ALL supermarkets stop supplying bags I am pretty sure people will find a way to carry their stuff home.

I find Aldi not much better as their stone fruit etc are in those soft plastic containers and you don't choose your fruit.  It puts me off shopping there for those items (although other things also put me off shopping at Aldi - but that is another thread).  So I am more likely now to go to out local fruit and veg and put it all in bags I brought from home - but it is definitely more pricey.

#36 born.a.girl

Posted 01 February 2018 - 06:59 AM

View PostNobody Cool, on 01 February 2018 - 06:40 AM, said:

I would love to see some sort of enforceable legislation around excessive packaging but I know it will never happen.

I think the problem there would be complexity: what's excessive packaging for one item, will be the appropriate packaging for the next.

We recently succumbed to the big TV (were watching on the smallest available) and my god, the amount of polystyrene around the TV, which I should imagine is not unreasonable given the sensitivity of the item and the awkwardness of moving the package means risk of impact.

Fortunately we are able to take it to local council depot for specific polystyrene recycling.

In my husband's work, they would often need tiny electronic components worth many thousands of dollars, and they, too, would have a large lump of protective packaging.

If you put the same amount around a durable item though, it would be ridiculous.

#37 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 01 February 2018 - 07:13 AM

Our council demands rubbish be in bags too. So plastic bags will still be needed here. Which is why supermarket bags are so handy.

#38 born.a.girl

Posted 01 February 2018 - 07:20 AM

Well, colour me incorrect, have just looked up our council information, and can honestly say have never seen this in any information we've  otherwise been provided, although I'd have been looking more closely at recycling information:

Quote

Make sure all your household waste is securely stored in bags to prevent spillage during collection.

We don't, and there's never been any 'spillage'.

I'm not sure whether they mean spillage as it gets upended, or the chance of it being knocked over during collection, or otherwise.


The only spillage we've had in our street is paper from recycling bins, and the night some teenagers thought it was funny to go down the street shoving the recycling bins upended on to the road, so I really don't see it as a valid request.

I certainly won't be changing the way we do ours unless they insist, as it will mean buying plastic bags.  I should imagine once that became public knowledge the council would need to back down on insisting.

#39 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 01 February 2018 - 07:32 AM

The good thing about recycling so much is that our actual rubbish is only 2-3 small bags worth a week, which is mostly soft plastics and left over food and food scraps. (We have no need of compost) plus one bag of nappies. So that's not a lot of plastic bags.

But I do use plastic bags a lot for other things, dog poo, poo nappies, bathroom rubbish, DH's sweaty gym clothes, pool clothes. And they're mostly reused from shopping bags, fruit and veg bags, I've even used bread bags for dirty nappies.

Not sure what to do about most of the above. I could give DH a thin cloth bag for his gross gym clothes, but I would have to wash it every single time, he sweats a lot. We have a dog and baby poo problem though!

#40 Kiwi Bicycle

Posted 01 February 2018 - 08:07 AM

Discussed this with a supermarket checkout person the other day if vege bags would also go. She thought not as she once had a customer loose unload their fruit onto the belt. It rolled everywhere and fell off and the operator had to sort out all the different types to weight. Simce time is money I suspect the small bags will stay.
I also read an article about backyard recycling that happens in China where people actually live with the recycling plastic in their yards and houses and sort it. They then melt it down in substandard ways without protection.  It's because of this  China has stopped importing overseas plastic recycling.

#41 Sentient Puddle

Posted 01 February 2018 - 08:14 AM

View PostKiwi Bicycle, on 01 February 2018 - 08:07 AM, said:

Discussed this with a supermarket checkout person the other day if vege bags would also go. She thought not as she once had a customer loose unload their fruit onto the belt. It rolled everywhere and fell off and the operator had to sort out all the different types to weight. Simce time is money I suspect the small bags will stay.
I also read an article about backyard recycling that happens in China where people actually live with the recycling plastic in their yards and houses and sort it. They then melt it down in substandard ways without protection.  It's because of this  China has stopped importing overseas plastic recycling.

When I go to the big supermarkets and buy fruit and veg - I never use small bags - even for things like beans - they all go on the conveyor belt - just grouped together so the operator can pick them up and weigh them!

#42 archyandmehitabel

Posted 01 February 2018 - 11:41 AM

View Post~LM~, on 31 January 2018 - 08:06 PM, said:

I'm still not convinced the plastic bag ban at supermarkets is better for us anyway. I reuse all our shopping bags a second or third time, and aren't they biodegradable these days? And when I worked in a supermarket, the reusable ones just didn't last, so you have to buy new ones pretty frequently. So where do the old ones end up? In land fill (And they are a b**** to pack too)

Other than having no packaging at all, I think we need to focus a lot more on fully biodegradable packaging.

Biodegradable isn't a good thing for plastic bags sadly. I thought it was better too, but then on War on Waste they had an academic expert who said biodegradable actually is worse environmentally. The plastics break down into very small pieces and enter the food chain.

I'm a bit surprised that you say the reusable bags need replacing. Our green bags are several years old and are still well useable. I wash them so they aren't gross and grubby to handle. The solid insert has broken on several so those bits had to be thrown out or stuck together with tape. Have also repaired the seams and handles on a few.

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 31 January 2018 - 09:34 PM, said:

Our council specifies that all waste must be contained in plastic bags before going in the rubbish bin. Is this usual or them being wasteful/lazy?

Yeah, so does our council. I would much prefer not to do it.  I can't use newspaper for the rubbish though, as we only use digital for newspapers. Read everything online!  Might try with the local paper.

#43 lumack

Posted 01 February 2018 - 12:15 PM

We’ve been working on going zero waste for a while now.

Our regular bin contains kitty litter and meat/dairy scraps.  Not even a bag of rubbish a week.  We don’t bag it, just tip it in loosely.

Our recycling bin is emptier every fortnight.

Our soft plastic (red cycle) waste has rapidly reduce.

We have a compost heap.

I use reusable bags for shopping - big ones for groceries, and I have a couple of small, fold up ones in my hand bag all the time.  I make my own produce bags out of curtain material from the op shop.  I have a bread bag for the bakery.

This year I am going to check out bulk buying stores near me.  I’ve heard they are horrendously expensive but i haven’t looked.

Recycling and redcycling are an alternative to landfill but they aren’t sustainable long term so I’m doing what I can to change our habits.  Manufacturers refuse to change due to cost constraints, or an insistence that the consumer doesn’t want that change.  Drives me batty.

#44 MarigoldMadge

Posted 01 February 2018 - 12:52 PM

View Post~LM~, on 01 February 2018 - 07:32 AM, said:

The good thing about recycling so much is that our actual rubbish is only 2-3 small bags worth a week, which is mostly soft plastics and left over food and food scraps. (We have no need of compost) plus one bag of nappies. So that's not a lot of plastic bags.

But I do use plastic bags a lot for other things, dog poo, poo nappies, bathroom rubbish, DH's sweaty gym clothes, pool clothes. And they're mostly reused from shopping bags, fruit and veg bags, I've even used bread bags for dirty nappies.

Not sure what to do about most of the above. I could give DH a thin cloth bag for his gross gym clothes, but I would have to wash it every single time, he sweats a lot. We have a dog and baby poo problem though!

Set up a dog bokashi thing in your back yard, if you have the space. Dog poo entombed in plastic at the top is not ideal either.

#45 MarigoldMadge

Posted 01 February 2018 - 12:56 PM

View Postlumack, on 01 February 2018 - 12:15 PM, said:

We’ve been working on going zero waste for a while now.

Our regular bin contains kitty litter and meat/dairy scraps.  Not even a bag of rubbish a week.  We don’t bag it, just tip it in loosely.

Our recycling bin is emptier every fortnight.

Our soft plastic (red cycle) waste has rapidly reduce.

We have a compost heap.

I use reusable bags for shopping - big ones for groceries, and I have a couple of small, fold up ones in my hand bag all the time.  I make my own produce bags out of curtain material from the op shop.  I have a bread bag for the bakery.

This year I am going to check out bulk buying stores near me.  I’ve heard they are horrendously expensive but i haven’t looked.

Recycling and redcycling are an alternative to landfill but they aren’t sustainable long term so I’m doing what I can to change our habits.  Manufacturers refuse to change due to cost constraints, or an insistence that the consumer doesn’t want that change.  Drives me batty.

Similarly, our bokashi takes our meat and diary scraps, so we have just about zero food scraps at all.

Kitty litter can also be composted through a similar system, if you have the space to house an in-ground version.

#46 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:21 PM

View PostMarigoldMadge, on 01 February 2018 - 12:52 PM, said:



Set up a dog bokashi thing in your back yard, if you have the space. Dog poo entombed in plastic at the top is not ideal either.

I've always wanted a worm farm actually, and I have just read that you can dedicate a worm farm to dog poo and they will happily turn it into compost! How about that! Except they don't recommend that you touch the resulting compost or put it on your vegie patch. Plus our dog is wormed monthly, which would kill the worms. Hmmmm, this may need more thought...

Think I'll get myself a worm farm though. It won't help this recycling dilemma, but it will give me somewhere for my kitchen scraps.

#47 Chicken Pie

Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:23 PM

i bought produce bags from nourished life to use rather than the plastic ones. for bigger fruit/veg i put straight onto the belt, and use the cloth bags for smaller items like beans etc

I keep soft plastics and hand in at coles when i have a full big bag.

we use keep cups. majority of our recycling is cardboard

#48 Kallie88

Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:35 PM

I really think we need to look at reusing more than recycling. I noticed a place in the dandy ranges (Vic) recently that's "unpackaged" so you bring your containers/ whatever and refill them with flour, nuts, etc instead of getting them in packages. If i could find one closer to home I'd 100% do this. People think recycling is a massive win for environmentalism but often there's heaps more chemicals going into processing it and it's expensive. Aluminium is the main exception i know of.

#49 born.a.girl

Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:35 PM

View PostMarigoldMadge, on 01 February 2018 - 12:56 PM, said:

Similarly, our bokashi takes our meat and diary scraps, so we have just about zero food scraps at all.

Kitty litter can also be composted through a similar system, if you have the space to house an in-ground version.

We just use a normal inside bin for the compost before it heads out to the compost bin, and I do chuck all dairy in there, but the animals are great for not ending up with meat scraps. :)

We tried composting the kitty litter but just ended up with a huge stink.  The brands that advertise themselves as compostable the cat rejected. :(   Really should give it another try, as the lumps go down the loo, so it's just wet stuff.

#50 born.a.girl

Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:39 PM

View PostMarigoldMadge, on 01 February 2018 - 12:52 PM, said:

Set up a dog bokashi thing in your back yard, if you have the space. Dog poo entombed in plastic at the top is not ideal either.

Most of mine is a few kilometres away at the off lead.

I was congratulating myself on using things like magazine wrappers, damaged plastic A4 paper holders, any little plastic bags that came with anything, until I found we could do soft plastic recycling at Woolworths.   I've never once bought dog poo bags, and we don't get them either with produce or shopping, so it is possible.




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