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Recycling becoming unviable


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#51 Illiterati

Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:39 PM

View PostSentient Puddle, on 01 February 2018 - 06:54 AM, said:



I find Aldi not much better as their stone fruit etc are in those soft plastic containers and you don't choose your fruit.  It puts me off shopping there for those items (although other things also put me off shopping at Aldi - but that is another thread).  So I am more likely now to go to out local fruit and veg and put it all in bags I brought from home - but it is definitely more pricey.

But they don't have one use check out bags - which was my point. That makes them better than the other supermarkets on that point.

And other supermarkets also package some of their produce. I'm like you though and prefer to go to F&V shops for that reason.

What is frustrating though is how people create blockers or excuses for change. Aldi has no check out bags but they still pack their apples in plastic so having no check out bags isn't that big a deal so isn't making a huge difference really so not really a 'solution' to 'the problem'.

#52 red_squirrel

Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:45 PM

Regarding the plastic supermarket bags, what do they plan for online shopping or home delivery?
They can't not have bags.
Maybe they should go back to brown paper.

#53 halcyondays

Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:48 PM

Harris farm use boxes and paper bags for their home delivery. Some of their produce is in plastic though.

#54 Illiterati

Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:12 PM

View Postred_squirrel, on 01 February 2018 - 01:45 PM, said:

Regarding the plastic supermarket bags, what do they plan for online shopping or home delivery?
They can't not have bags.
Maybe they should go back to brown paper.

If your a regular - they could just use those collapsible crates that they put the bags in and wheel to your house. Even if not a regular you could unpack straight out of them and they could be collected after on a agreed schedule. It might not work for 100 per cent of online shoppers - but it could be doable for most.

#55 red_squirrel

Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:30 PM

View PostIlliterati, on 01 February 2018 - 02:12 PM, said:



If your a regular - they could just use those collapsible crates that they put the bags in and wheel to your house. Even if not a regular you could unpack straight out of them and they could be collected after on a agreed schedule. It might not work for 100 per cent of online shoppers - but it could be doable for most.
But that would require buying millions more plastic crates. So not really a saving.

#56 Illiterati

Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:46 PM

View Postred_squirrel, on 01 February 2018 - 02:30 PM, said:


But that would require buying millions more plastic crates. So not really a saving.

Better not to do anything then until we come up with a perfect solution.

The best thing would be to unpack on to a table / kitchen bench when they deliver - so no extra crates or plastic bags. Or the customer could have a couple of their washing baskets out for the shopping to be transferred into. Why can't that happen right now?

And would it be 'millions' more if regulars did a crate exchange?  Perhaps they could make the extra crates out of some of the millions of plastic bags being used every day.

So how are either of those things not a saving or an improvement?

Edited by Illiterati, 01 February 2018 - 03:36 PM.


#57 Selkie

Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:51 PM

View Postred_squirrel, on 01 February 2018 - 01:45 PM, said:

Regarding the plastic supermarket bags, what do they plan for online shopping or home delivery?
They can't not have bags.
Maybe they should go back to brown paper.

They manage in the UK. Shopping goes into crates, crates are emptied onto front hall/kitchen table. Takes an extra minute or 2 to unpack, but I'd happily pay a few extra dollars for the delivery guy's few extra minutes to unpack, if it meant I could do away with the plastic bags.

#58 born.a.girl

Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:52 PM

View Postred_squirrel, on 01 February 2018 - 01:45 PM, said:

Regarding the plastic supermarket bags, what do they plan for online shopping or home delivery?
They can't not have bags.
Maybe they should go back to brown paper.

My understanding is the end of the 'single use' bag, and in some places this has meant supermarkets changing to thicker plastic (not considered single use) and charging for it - not as thick as the Aldi ones, but thicker than current ones.

#59 Chicken Pie

Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:55 PM

View Posthalcyondays, on 01 February 2018 - 01:48 PM, said:

Harris farm use boxes and paper bags for their home delivery. Some of their produce is in plastic though.
i used to get coles and it was always collapsable crates

#60 Caribou

Posted 01 February 2018 - 03:11 PM

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 31 January 2018 - 07:20 PM, said:

I’ve got a recycling question - coffee cups aren’t recyclable due to the plastic waterproof lining (i think), so how come milk cartons are recyclable? Surely they would be very similar?

But to the original point - I wish it was easier to buy things without packaging. And less packaging in general. Our recycling bin is always so full and I’ve felt bad about that for a while. I will have to think about ways to cut that down.

And on waste in general - shopping with my mum and my aunt - I put a couple of apples in the trolley. My aunt goes and gets a bag and puts them in - what on earth for? Apparently I don’t want trolley germs on my apples. I informed her it was an awful waste and I wash my fruit and veg before consumption. It had not occurred to either of them to not use plastic bags for every single item.

I use ONYA produce bags to protect my fruit and begs. Super durable and washable! Love them.

https://www.floraand...6BoCAlIQAvD_BwE

As for coffee cups, I either use keep cups or go for coffee shops that use biocups which break down in landfill, not recyclable but better than nothing. You know it’s a biocup bc it’s all over the cup!

#61 Rowenas Necklace

Posted 01 February 2018 - 03:27 PM

Our council is trialling community composting in some areas - you get a bin for all organic items, including meat and pet waste. I'm really hoping they expand it; most of our rubbish is organic.

We do have too much recycling though, we use reusable bags and coffee cups but we need to do more.

#62 *Nasty*Squeekums*

Posted 01 February 2018 - 09:00 PM

View Postred_squirrel, on 01 February 2018 - 01:45 PM, said:

Regarding the plastic supermarket bags, what do they plan for online shopping or home delivery?
They can't not have bags.
Maybe they should go back to brown paper.

Thats a valid point. As an online shopper one that now worries me lol

Paper wouldnt work for frozen items in general also

Reuseable crates would be a cost that the consumer ends up paying, theft, damage plus the inital stock up and ongoing buying as more using online shopping.

#63 Fright bat

Posted 01 February 2018 - 09:05 PM

View PostOzquoll, on 31 January 2018 - 08:48 PM, said:


What would he use to pick the meat out of the cabinet though? My butcher said having tongs for every different cut was too fiddly, and if they use their bare hands they have to go scrub them to avoid cross-contamination, so it is much easier for them to use the plastic bag to pick the meat up, then just turn it inside-out so the meat is inside the bag.

Too fiddly is a p*ss poor excuse

#64 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 01 February 2018 - 09:09 PM

Online shopping will be a pain, what can they do? just leave it all loose? my delivery drivers are already constantly late due to unrealistic delivery targets (according to many different drivers), imagine if they had to empty every item from the tub individually? They would never be on time, ever.

And i hated when i did lite and easy briefly and they left the box at your home all week to be picked up at the next drop off, i didn't have room to store a polystyrene box all week, and i certainly don't want to store a dozen plastic crates for a grocery delivery. And people in apartments certainly couldn't store the tubs.

will be interesting to see what they do.  I think they will stick with a few plastic bags for the time being, maybe for small and cold things at the very least.

#65 Fresh Start

Posted 01 February 2018 - 09:31 PM

archyandmehitabel, on 01 February 2018 - 11:41 AM, said:

I can't use newspaper for the rubbish though, as we only use digital for newspapers. Read everything online!  Might try with the local paper.

XH’s Dad gets the paper delivered everyday and he passes it in to XH. They pile up on his back patio table u til he finally recycles. So now I get a few every couple fr months for my bin liner!

I can also get the old papers from work right before they go in the recycle bin.

#66 Kallie88

Posted 01 February 2018 - 09:37 PM

wouldn't you just be able to use the fabric bags for online delivery? With the cold ones for freezer items?

#67 Ozquoll

Posted 01 February 2018 - 09:47 PM

View PostFright bat, on 01 February 2018 - 09:05 PM, said:



Too fiddly is a p*ss poor excuse
True, they probably just can’t be a*sed. One consolation to me is they still use a helluva lot less plastic than the supermarket meat departments.

#68 born.a.girl

Posted 02 February 2018 - 12:38 PM

View PostKallie88, on 01 February 2018 - 09:37 PM, said:

wouldn't you just be able to use the fabric bags for online delivery? With the cold ones for freezer items?

Whose, though?


If it's the customer's, how do you get them to the shop, if the whole objective is to NOT go to the shop?

If it's the stores, how do they get them back, without unloading each and every item, which sound very cost inefficient for the stores and time inefficient for the customer?

Fortunately I loathe the idea of online ordering and delivering for groceries, so won't affect me.

#69 Selkie

Posted 02 February 2018 - 01:12 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 02 February 2018 - 12:38 PM, said:

Whose, though?


If it's the customer's, how do you get them to the shop, if the whole objective is to NOT go to the shop?

If it's the stores, how do they get them back, without unloading each and every item, which sound very cost inefficient for the stores and time inefficient for the customer?

Fortunately I loathe the idea of online ordering and delivering for groceries, so won't affect me.

View Post~LM~, on 01 February 2018 - 09:09 PM, said:

Online shopping will be a pain, what can they do? just leave it all loose? my delivery drivers are already constantly late due to unrealistic delivery targets (according to many different drivers), imagine if they had to empty every item from the tub individually? They would never be on time, ever.

And i hated when i did lite and easy briefly and they left the box at your home all week to be picked up at the next drop off, i didn't have room to store a polystyrene box all week, and i certainly don't want to store a dozen plastic crates for a grocery delivery. And people in apartments certainly couldn't store the tubs.

will be interesting to see what they do.  I think they will stick with a few plastic bags for the time being, maybe for small and cold things at the very least.

Yep, leave it loose. It wouldn't be any different to loading a conveyer belt at checkout. Each crate only takes 2-3 bags anyway, so it's already fiddly. Yes, it would cost slightly more due to more time - many people would be happy to pay that it they had the option!

#70 born.a.girl

Posted 02 February 2018 - 01:26 PM

View PostSelkie, on 02 February 2018 - 01:12 PM, said:

Yep, leave it loose. It wouldn't be any different to loading a conveyer belt at checkout. Each crate only takes 2-3 bags anyway, so it's already fiddly. Yes, it would cost slightly more due to more time - many people would be happy to pay that it they had the option!

Most people don't have conveyor belts at home (and I'm not being facetious).   The belts have raised edges all around to contain everything that's on there.

Unloading them all at delivery time would mean the customer would need to have a surface clean - one that can handle both the food and the white king and that things couldn't roll off.

I should imagine there will be enough customers who insist that the the different groups be placed in different spots (which is not unreasonable, but would be an unreasonable delay for the driver) ... etc. etc.



If that's what people want, instead of paying for the newer, thicker bags, then presumably they're prepared to pay for it.

#71 IShallWearMidnight

Posted 02 February 2018 - 01:45 PM

For online groceries we dropped off a set of labeled bags originally and just swap bags each delivery/pickup.
We have 2 sets and they are labeled “Surname 1/10, surname 2/10 etc’
The rest comes in a banana box which I either unpack quickly or return next time, with the other set of bags.
The bulk of our shopping is ‘click and collect’ or delivered, but I get most fresh stuff from the farm gate or our local markets depending on time.

ETA many people use this system at our local stores, so its no drama

Edited by IShallWearMidnight, 02 February 2018 - 01:48 PM.


#72 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 02 February 2018 - 09:36 PM

I just looked at my local council website, and I can order a bokashi bin for much less than the rrp! What a win!

#73 Kallie88

Posted 02 February 2018 - 10:17 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 02 February 2018 - 12:38 PM, said:



Whose, though?


If it's the customer's, how do you get them to the shop, if the whole objective is to NOT go to the shop?

If it's the stores, how do they get them back, without unloading each and every item, which sound very cost inefficient for the stores and time inefficient for the customer?

Fortunately I loathe the idea of online ordering and delivering for groceries, so won't affect me.

Send them out from the store, customers can return them with next shipment or in store? I'm sure you'd get some losses but it's not like the Coles and Woollies  aren't making billions in profits...

#74 *Nasty*Squeekums*

Posted 02 February 2018 - 10:41 PM

View PostSelkie, on 01 February 2018 - 02:51 PM, said:

They manage in the UK. Shopping goes into crates, crates are emptied onto front hall/kitchen table. Takes an extra minute or 2 to unpack, but I'd happily pay a few extra dollars for the delivery guy's few extra minutes to unpack, if it meant I could do away with the plastic bags.

See, i wouldnt, i dont invite people into my home, i get a different driver every time so its not like there a built customer relationship
Id also not want to pay more as i shop online to save money, no petrol to shops and no impulse buying that way

View PostSelkie, on 02 February 2018 - 01:12 PM, said:

Yep, leave it loose. It wouldn't be any different to loading a conveyer belt at checkout. Each crate only takes 2-3 bags anyway, so it's already fiddly. Yes, it would cost slightly more due to more time - many people would be happy to pay that it they had the option!
I only ever see thing like pumpkin and watermelon bagless at checkout  
I dont know a single person who wants to add more money to their shopping bill. All i know are trying to reduce it further and would complain about any rise in cost as well as inconvenience of no bags

#75 Green Gummy Bear

Posted 09 February 2018 - 12:37 PM

We online grocery shop quite a lot.  Woolies bag everything and drop it at the door.

Coles have the collapsible crates and unpack straight onto the table, however they still use plastic bags for frozen goods and fruit/veg.  Not sure how to get around that really.

Side note, are long life milk cartons recyclable?




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