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Advice on legislation in qld for drop off


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#1 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 04:49 PM

Need advice. I know in qld you have to be 18 to collect from preschool.  But do you have to be 18 to drop off?  

Dd preschool opens at 830. In past years the doors were open from 820ish and parents could go in start settling kids ect. Now they are locked until 830 on the dot.  There is a line of parents waiting to drop off at 830. So impossible to get away until 835 at least sometimes 840.   If dh drops the kids off and has to wait he will be late for work. The preschool is located on the school grounds.  

Ds9 is very responsible. Would there be an issue with him getting dropped at the Kindy with dd at 820, signing her in and putting her bag away? She is 4.5 almost. Literally a month older and she would already be at school where she could technically be dropped at the gate.

I don’t want advice on whether others would do this just from a legal point does the person signing in have to be 18?

#2 .Jerry.

Posted 19 February 2018 - 04:55 PM

What type of facility is it?  A child care centre?  A C&K?

#3 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 04:59 PM

View Post.Jerry., on 19 February 2018 - 04:55 PM, said:

What type of facility is it?  A child care centre?  A C&K?

A c&k. Hence the restricted hours.  Love the Kindy and don’t want to change her.

#4 AKAmum

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:04 PM

Our LDC in QLD is C&K and they put out a notice last year to say that children in daycare or kindergarten had to be signed in by a responsible adult as there had been some older siblings walking them in. This is a stand alone centre though, not on a school site.

Can you look on the C&K site to check their policy?

#5 .Jerry.

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:06 PM

This link may be of help:
https://www.qld.gov....es/kindergarten

It has links to various pieces of legislation.
I am not sure which one relates to your type of service.

You could email the director and ask for clarification on the drop off ruling.

Regarding school drop off, I am a principal and we still require an adult (or at least 16 yo) to drop off / pick up a Prep student from the door of Prep room at 9am/3pm.  

Individual schools/ centres are able to make their own policies.

#6 too tired to care

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:19 PM

Can I just clarify, you are expecting your 9 year old to wait and be responsible for. your 4 year old?

i believe legislation is responsible person, (so usually over 16) so your 9 year old would not qualify.

Personally i would also not expect my 9 year old to be responsible for my 4 year old. 4 year olds are unpredictable ad car parks for school/ kindy are crazy around here.
What if something happened , school did not open on time, your 4 year old got hurt, etc. they are the responsible person so it would be the 9 year old decision on what to do.

Personally I would ask another parent who is doing drop off if they would be ok to be the responsible person for the short time you need it. if they are unwilling you could discuss the timing issue with child care management and see what they suggest.

#7 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:21 PM

View Post.Jerry., on 19 February 2018 - 05:06 PM, said:

This link may be of help:
https://www.qld.gov....es/kindergarten

It has links to various pieces of legislation.
I am not sure which one relates to your type of service.

You could email the director and ask for clarification on the drop off ruling.

Regarding school drop off, I am a principal and we still require an adult (or at least 16 yo) to drop off / pick up a Prep student from the door of Prep room at 9am/3pm.  

Individual schools/ centres are able to make their own policies.

Thanks I’ll have a look. Our school is very relaxed with pick up and drop off.

Like kids in grade 1 can come over and collect prep kids to take to carpark, and happens quite often. Preps can be dropped off at 815 same as the rest of the school.

I’m concerned if I ask the director they will just say no without actually seeing if legally it’s ok it not.

#8 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:23 PM

Also, they wouldn’t be waiting In the carpark. They would be waiting in a gated area next to the entrance to the Kindy which is separated from the carpark by a high gate (Pool fence type)

#9 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:26 PM

Where you are going to encounter difficulty is the responsibility the C&K has in keeping your child safe.

ECE staff are not allowed to release children into the care of a drug or alcohol affected parent or to permit them to travel improperly restrained - we have to try and prevent it and reprt it if it occurs.

So my judgement will be that a 9 year old no matter how responsible is not able to take charge of 4 year old. Yes practically they would be fine - probably -but I can't take the risk of knowing that your 9 year old was in charge and then something disastrous happening.

Ask another parent.

BTW for staffing and insurance reasons it is not possible to open prior. We are covered for the operating hours only

#10 SeaPrincess

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:34 PM

View Postknottygirl, on 19 February 2018 - 05:21 PM, said:

I’m concerned if I ask the director they will just say no without actually seeing if legally it’s ok it not.

Even if legally it may be acceptable, if it is against the facility policy, they don’t have to allow it. With the requirement to sign her in, I wouldn’t think it would be permitted.

#11 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:40 PM

View PostAnon100, on 19 February 2018 - 05:26 PM, said:

Where you are going to encounter difficulty is the responsibility the C&K has in keeping your child safe.

ECE staff are not allowed to release children into the care of a drug or alcohol affected parent or to permit them to travel improperly restrained - we have to try and prevent it and reprt it if it occurs.


He wouldn’t be picking her up just taking her inside. So they would not be releasing her to anyone.  Like I said I understand that you must be 18 or whatever to collect. But is there an actual law about drop off?

I’m comfortable with the decision. I don’t need advice on whether someone else would or wouldn’t do this. As I said if she was 3 weeks older she would be in prep and being dropped at the gate with him. I just want to know legally, can he drop her off.  Have been unable to find anything definitive. So to me that means that they aren’t able to say no if there is no specific law against it.

#12 José

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:42 PM

im pretty sure a centre can make policies about this even if it isnt specifically legislated.

#13 Just Jack

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:44 PM

View Postknottygirl, on 19 February 2018 - 05:40 PM, said:



He wouldn’t be picking her up just taking her inside. So they would not be releasing her to anyone.  Like I said I understand that you must be 18 or whatever to collect. But is there an actual law about drop off?

I’m comfortable with the decision. I don’t need advice on whether someone else would or wouldn’t do this. As I said if she was 3 weeks older she would be in prep and being dropped at the gate with him. I just want to know legally, can he drop her off.  Have been unable to find anything definitive. So to me that means that they aren’t able to say no if there is no specific law against it.

But they don't have to accept her to teach her, either.

#14 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:47 PM

View PostJust Jack, on 19 February 2018 - 05:44 PM, said:



But they don't have to accept her to teach her, either.

She enrolled in the centre? How can they refuse to accept her? I would think once they were in the door that would then be a breech if they sent them away.

#15 IkeaAddict

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:49 PM

Are you really going to argue against a preschool facility NOT allowing a 9 year old to drop a younger child off because it is more convenient for you? Who would you blame if something was to happen to both your children while this was happening? Is it your fault for insisting they do it, is it their fault for allowing it despite you demanding it, is it some random act of nature that can be blamed?

Yes your 9 year old may be responsible but there are a lot of other things outside of your control that a 9 year old, no matter how responsible, wouldn't be able to handle

#16 Future-self

Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:58 PM

View Postknottygirl, on 19 February 2018 - 05:40 PM, said:

So to me that means that they aren’t able to say no if there is no specific law against it.
LOL Of course they can. They're a privately run optional kindergarten. They can have rules, policies, hours and philosophies that you agree to as being a part of the community. If you don;t agree with any of these things then you can leave and put her elsewhere. Its not a public school, they don't have to accept you.

It's not convenient, I get that. Kindy hours aren't. We chose one over a LDC and knew that we were accepting their restrictions and had to adapt our works hours around theirs.

Edited by Future-self, 19 February 2018 - 06:00 PM.


#17 rileys-mum

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:03 PM

My 9 year old loves socialising before school. There is no way I would make him stand in line to drop off a sibling. You need to find an adult to do this. Be first in line at 8:30 - negotiate a 10 minutes shorter lunch break or a later finish time for your DH.

#18 casime

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:06 PM

Your biggest problem is not the drop off, but the ten minute window that your children are unsupervised before the doors are open.  Our school only takes responsibility for students fifteen minutes before the bell in the morning and fifteen minutes at the end of the day, as there are no teachers on duty outside of that time, even though most of us are in our classrooms and getting ready.  If your child's kindy doesn't open the doors until 8:30, you can't drop off at 8:20 and expect them to be supervised.  The school would likely tell you that you need to stay with your children until the doors open.  



#19 TinMan

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:07 PM

https://www.candk.as... and access.pdf

Policy says not delivered or collected by someone 11yrs of age or under.

#20 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:11 PM

As I said I’m not looking for advice on whether others would or wouldn’t do this. I’m just looking for specific legislation or a policy that says he’s not allowed to.   It’s difficult for others to grasp as you have different kids, different layouts of Kindy, different family circumstances. But as I said I’m more than comfortable with him doing it in our situation.

#21 rileys-mum

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:13 PM

But you are not allowed to. You need someone older. The rules apply to everyone. You need to find an alturmative solution for all of the reasons mentioned above.

#22 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:14 PM

View PostTinMan, on 19 February 2018 - 06:07 PM, said:

https://www.candk.as... and access.pdf

Policy says not delivered or collected by someone 11yrs of age or under.

Ok thanks.  Odd that it groups drop off and pick up and that it allows 12 to collect. That suits me though we can arrange a 12 year old relative to go with them and drop her off.

#23 casime

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:14 PM

If you want a policy, have you actually tried asking the kindy?

#24 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:22 PM

View Postrileys-mum, on 19 February 2018 - 06:13 PM, said:

But you are not allowed to. You need someone older. The rules apply to everyone. You need to find an alturmative solution for all of the reasons mentioned above.

FYI I was asking what the rules were specifically and if such rules or laws existed. One pp found actual rules everyone else was just providing opinions which I stated I wasn’t interested in.  I wasn’t saying I would break the rules I just wanted to know if there was something as I wasn’t able to find anything specific.  

My previous post was written at the same time as the pp that posted the policy hence I hadnt seen it when i posted.

#25 Just Jack

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:43 PM

View Postknottygirl, on 19 February 2018 - 05:47 PM, said:



She enrolled in the centre? How can they refuse to accept her? I would think once they were in the door that would then be a breech if they sent them away.

Sure, they'd probably take her one day. But if you continuously chose not to follow a policy or requirement of the centre, it would be within their rights to cancel her enrollment - they're not obliged to educate her.




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