Jump to content

Advice on legislation in qld for drop off


  • Please log in to reply
58 replies to this topic

#26 wombats

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:47 PM

But you need to be aware that an individual c&k can, because of the individual situation, layouts etc chose to not allow a 12 year old do a dropdoff.

#27 ~elle~

Posted 19 February 2018 - 06:52 PM

OMG - how is this even a question?
Get your hubby to forgo his morning tea break so he can sign in his 4 yr old child as per the rules.

#28 spr_maiden

Posted 19 February 2018 - 07:09 PM

As PP mentioned, I think the trouble will be with the gap between drop off and doors open and who will be responsible in the case of an accident.

I get what you're saying re your 9yr old.  There's a family I know, 4 kids, eldest is 9 and she is extremely mature and capable for her age. She often delivers her younger siblings to class and picks them up to walk home.
I think if their policy is pretty clear, you'd be better off arranging for another kindy parent to do a drop off/pick up swap.

#29 Nobodyelse

Posted 19 February 2018 - 08:39 PM

A small anecdeta.

When I was in highschool, there were these two little girls on my bus. A regular, public bus. One was about 10 and the othe a preppy, so 4 or 5. They sat there alone every morning and got off when they needed to. Kept to themselves and were very well behaved.

Then one day, the preppy vomitted everywhere. Then she started to cry. The older child had no idea what to do. Comfort or clean her? She struggled to do both. Us regulars came to their assistance but they were relucantant to take it. They'd obviously been drilled to not talk to strangers. They eventually got off at their stop, two distressed and confused little things.

They never caught the bus again after that.

I would be surprised if the centre will allow children to dop off children. Even if legally, the child is allowed to. That doesn't translate to them legally being forced to allow it. If I ran a child centre, I wouldn't allow it for the very reasons above. The kids might be the model of maturity. But when something goes wrong, they're too young to problem solve safely.

#30 seayork2002

Posted 19 February 2018 - 08:45 PM

I would be surprised if their insurance allows them and morally i would hope they wouldnt

#31 Princess Sparkles

Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:05 PM

Both my older girls, at the time 9 and 7, would be dropped off with my 4 yr old at school and they would walk her into kinder (pre school on school grounds) and get her settled. There is no legislation here regarding it and the teachers were fine. They would also pick her up from her classroom and walk to the pick up zone as well. Mind you I let them walk home at 10 and 8 together (10-15 min walk in suburban area).

Edited by Princess Sparkles, 19 February 2018 - 09:05 PM.


#32 ~J_F~

Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:11 PM

View Post~elle~, on 19 February 2018 - 06:52 PM, said:

OMG - how is this even a question?
Get your hubby to forgo his morning tea break so he can sign in his 4 yr old child as per the rules.

You have absolutely no idea what he does for a living and he may not get regular breaks or be able to change his work hours. And before you do the whole legally crap, sure but it doesn't always work out that way!

It annoys me when people are like oh just don't have this break or that one and finish earlier. Not everyone has that option. If you have, awesome but one would assume the OP knows her situation best.

I would have no issues with my older kids doing this at that age for the younger one if the centre allowed it :)

#33 Mozzie1

Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:20 PM

View PostTired & Nasty, on 19 February 2018 - 05:19 PM, said:

Can I just clarify, you are expecting your 9 year old to wait and be responsible for. your 4 year old?

i believe legislation is responsible person, (so usually over 16) so your 9 year old would not qualify.

Personally i would also not expect my 9 year old to be responsible for my 4 year old. 4 year olds are unpredictable ad car parks for school/ kindy are crazy around here.
What if something happened , school did not open on time, your 4 year old got hurt, etc. they are the responsible person so it would be the 9 year old decision on what to do.

Personally I would ask another parent who is doing drop off if they would be ok to be the responsible person for the short time you need it. if they are unwilling you could discuss the timing issue with child care management and see what they suggest.

The OP specifically asked people NOT to give her opinions on whether they would do this or not.

#34 IkeaAddict

Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:22 PM

Other posts OP has made has indicated that she is a SAHM. Is there the option of her getting her child to preschool to avoid the potential of putting a 4 year old under the care of a 9 year old?

And people can say what they like. I'd much rather risk losing my job than I would putting my childs life, or in the OPs case, BOTH kids life, at risk, if something were to go wrong.

#35 SeaPrincess

Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:23 PM

Does the school have OSHC that can take the children earlier and sign the younger child into kinder? Or is this not on a school site?

Forcing the school to change a policy is not the answer.

#36 ekbaby

Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:29 PM

Putting the kids life at risk by leaving them in a fenced area next to a preschool for 10 minutes with other parents walking past regularly?
Jeepers

#37 Freddie'sMum

Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:36 PM

I would simply ask the c&k what their specific rules are about drop offs.  

Is there anyone else who could do the drop off ?

#38 knottygirl

Posted 19 February 2018 - 09:57 PM

View Postekbaby, on 19 February 2018 - 09:29 PM, said:

Putting the kids life at risk by leaving them in a fenced area next to a preschool for 10 minutes with other parents walking past regularly?
Jeepers

IKR? No wonder so many cotton wool kids 🙄. I’m trying to raise resilient kids who are not scared of their own shadows.  

I am a sahp but am working casually.

I think will get dh to rush in sign the book and leave. Ds can take her in put her bag away and things away.  Or get our 12 yo relative to wait and sign her in.  

I can’t believe people saying their kids would rather socialise and that’s a reason for them to not help out in the family. I don’t raise my kids like that, to be so self absorbed and self centred.

But you know what, my ds would love to help out because kids love having responsibilities it builds up their self confidence and helps raise better citizens.  He’s only 9 and he already volunteers twice a week at local clubs helping out with younger kids.  He is always the first to volunteer to push younger ones on a swing or keep an eye on toddlers at the playground.  

Thanks for the pps who were supportive 😁

#39 Dianalynch

Posted 19 February 2018 - 10:34 PM

One day we will look back in disbelief that work and school were structured in a way that made parenting and working at times impossible...my sympathies you're in this predicament op.

#40 Franny and Zooey

Posted 19 February 2018 - 10:43 PM

View PostIkeaAddict, on 19 February 2018 - 09:22 PM, said:

Other posts OP has made has indicated that she is a SAHM. Is there the option of her getting her child to preschool to avoid the potential of putting a 4 year old under the care of a 9 year old?

And people can say what they like. I'd much rather risk losing my job than I would putting my childs life, or in the OPs case, BOTH kids life, at risk, if something were to go wrong.

Oooooh bit of detective work with a whiff judgement to add to the mix!

#41 Lokum

Posted 19 February 2018 - 10:44 PM

Baaahhhhahha.  Risking a 4 yr old's life. Snort.

There are kids at the same location of almost the same age being dropped off as Preps in their FYOS. Are their lives also at risk?

I am also raising mine (5 and 7) to be resilient and independent. One has ASD and one has ADHD. Both have poor concentration and poor impulse control, so I am careful about them walking where they need to cross a road or carpark.

That said, they can make a simple pasta dish, and the big one can make a wicked risotto if I cut up the pumpkin first.  Including lighting a stove and using a knife (I watch, pretending to do something else.)

They can approach a waitress, librarian or shop assistant and ask politely for what they need.

They can call an ambulance (haven't been tested in an actual emergency.)

I take raising my children seriously. I am gradually raising them to be mature, independent, confident, capable and resilient adults. Not trying to keep them as babies.

#42 SeaPrincess

Posted 20 February 2018 - 12:17 AM

^^But can’t you do all that AND adhere to the policies of the school where you chose to enrol your child?

#43 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 20 February 2018 - 06:02 AM

Knottygirl your difficulty is that you are wanting definitive legislation that says yes or no.

The national Quality legislation doesn't work like that, it is deliberately very vague. (As a teacher i can't get a definitive answer on staffing for instance - I was told it was a 'grey' area just last week)
Therefore you are reliant on the policy developed by an individual centre.
These policies - despite the pages they go on for are also open to interpretation, particularly in your case where the centre is on the school grounds.

So while you are looking at a best case scenario - responsible big brother doing drop off the centre will be catastrophising - because we have to.
If we knowingly allow something to occur - regular drop offs by a 9 year old and something does happen then we are regarded as liable for that incident. That liability extends as far as prosecution and I am unwilling to take that risk.

So yes it's an opinion but only because it is not like driving a car - it's not a obvious answer.

#44 knottygirl

Posted 20 February 2018 - 09:51 AM

View PostLokum, on 19 February 2018 - 10:44 PM, said:

Baaahhhhahha.  Risking a 4 yr old's life. Snort.

There are kids at the same location of almost the same age being dropped off as Preps in their FYOS. Are their lives also at risk?

I am also raising mine (5 and 7) to be resilient and independent. One has ASD and one has ADHD. Both have poor concentration and poor impulse control, so I am careful about them walking where they need to cross a road or carpark.

That said, they can make a simple pasta dish, and the big one can make a wicked risotto if I cut up the pumpkin first.  Including lighting a stove and using a knife (I watch, pretending to do something else.)

They can approach a waitress, librarian or shop assistant and ask politely for what they need.

They can call an ambulance (haven't been tested in an actual emergency.)

I take raising my children seriously. I am gradually raising them to be mature, independent, confident, capable and resilient adults. Not trying to keep them as babies.

I totally agree.  It’s not a parents job to keep them dependent on you forever.  Good idea teaching them cooking too, we might start doing this also. They already help chop vegetables ect but actually cooking a whole dish is a great idea.

When we enrolled they didn’t actually give us copies of any policies. They said it’s against their policy to waste the paper printing them and they were available online 🙄. When I looked at the website It was very glitchy and kept asking for admin passwords. I have no idea how the pp managed to find the link.

I wasn’t expecting them to have a drop off policy. Our old daycare only had a pickup policy. Anyone could drop off. Hence why I asked about legislation. I thought if it’s not mentioned in their policy and there is no law specifically against it then it wouldn’t be an issue. Obviously now i know that there is a policy and I will make arrangements around it, like I said, getting dh to just sign in then go and ds can still take her in, put her things away with her, settle her into an activity then go to his class.

Ds was only 2 months older than dd when he started school at 4. Being my oldest, and with dd as a newborn he used to get dropped off at the gate and walked himself in. I never felt I was risking his life.    

Plus, how do people think kids are going to learn to deal with difficult situations if you aren’t ever in them?  

Interesting the pp had a story about a child vomiting on the bus and had no idea what to do. I had a friend who as an ADULT had her baby vomit in the bath and not know what to do. She completely freaked out and then called her mum to come over and fix him. So he stayed in the bath in vomit until her mum got there.  Then her mum fixed him for her.  

Dealing with difficult situations comes from having confidence in your abilities. Kids that have everything done for them won’t develop this.

#45 spr_maiden

Posted 20 February 2018 - 10:08 AM

I wouldn't say I'm the most relaxed parent around, but I do wonder what stops people from encouraging children to contribute to family life when they are capable of it. Not in a judgy way, just curious.
Especially as most of us would have been doing such things as same aged children ourselves iykwim.
A friend  nearly fell over when I mentioned DS has been ironing his school clothes since he was 7, and he will also iron his sister's clothes for her. Her youngest is same age as my eldest and her other is in fyohs.
Is it we worry that we're not doing our parenting job well enough? Scared of judgment? Easier to do ourselves than teach them? Intolerance of child level completion of tasks? Is it the what ifs and fear of things/people outside of our control?
Anyway. My musing is probably too philosophical for this thread and time of day.

#46 IkeaAddict

Posted 20 February 2018 - 04:27 PM

View PostFranny and Zooey, on 19 February 2018 - 10:43 PM, said:

Oooooh bit of detective work with a whiff judgement to add to the mix!

Hardly detective work...not that hard to click on a persons name to get basic details of other stuff they posted. If only "detective work" were that easy

#47 Mollycoddle

Posted 20 February 2018 - 04:50 PM

View PostAnon100, on 19 February 2018 - 05:26 PM, said:



ECE staff are not allowed to release children into the care of a drug or alcohol affected parent or to permit them to travel improperly restrained - we have to try and prevent it and reprt it if it occurs.


The centre aren't putting  the child into the care of the 9-year-old - the OP is.  She means bringing the child to school, not picking her up after.

#48 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 20 February 2018 - 05:00 PM

View PostMollycoddle, on 20 February 2018 - 04:50 PM, said:

The centre aren't putting  the child into the care of the 9-year-old - the OP is.  She means bringing the child to school, not picking her up after.

However if we permitted the drop off we would, if the dept discovered it, be viewed as condoning the practice.

I used the example of the intoxicated parent to illustrate that we don't cease to have responsibility outside teaching time.

The sign-in book is a legal document and in permitting a 9 year old to sign it we are accepting this as an approved practice.

In reality the centre may think it is a reasonable thing to do but unfortunately the reality is that it is not something that would be regarded as permissible.

#49 annodam

Posted 20 February 2018 - 05:01 PM

.

Edited by annodam, 07 August 2019 - 12:48 PM.


#50 Fossy

Posted 20 February 2018 - 05:10 PM

i would just do the drop offs myself and test the waters by asking if they mind if your older child signs in the younger child very ocassionally when you’re working.  I wouldn’t expect them to do it every day though if myself or my husband could.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.