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Seeing so many newborns night-sleeping with blankets..


72 replies to this topic

#26 marple

Posted 15 March 2018 - 09:56 AM

Are these photos on facebook that you are seeing?

Anyway, I always used blankets too. So do hospitals.

#27 Kallie88

Posted 15 March 2018 - 10:08 AM

I don't think we need to slam the op it sounds like she's genuinely confused about the guidelines to me. And pps have said it very clearly, blankets tucked tightly into the end of the bed are fine - this is because they shouldn't be able to come loose and cover baby's head, loose blankets/ toys/( anything really) are not recommended as they could move and cover babies head blocking their airways.

#28 needs to get out

Posted 15 March 2018 - 11:04 AM

Recommendations in the US (American Acadmy of Paediattics) are very clear about any blanket use being unsafe. They endorse ‘wearable blankets’ ie sleep sacks only. And they say to cease all firm swaddling around the chest by 8 weeks.

https://www.healthyc...Safe-Sleep.aspx

I imagine our recommendations may also evolve.

#29 Lifesgood

Posted 15 March 2018 - 11:17 AM

View Postsuburban dystopia, on 15 March 2018 - 11:04 AM, said:

Recommendations in the US (American Acadmy of Paediattics) are very clear about any blanket use being unsafe. They endorse ‘wearable blankets’ ie sleep sacks only. And they say to cease all firm swaddling around the chest by 8 weeks.

https://www.healthyc...Safe-Sleep.aspx

I imagine our recommendations may also evolve.
Gosh that is interesting. I think the problem with blankets is when they are used incorrectly i.e. placed loosely over the baby or the baby's feet aren't against the end of the bed. Possibly the guidelines are evolving to reduce the risk of incorrect use.

#30 Lady Gray

Posted 15 March 2018 - 11:45 AM

View PostKallie88, on 15 March 2018 - 10:08 AM, said:

I don't think we need to slam the op it sounds like she's genuinely confused about the guidelines to me. And pps have said it very clearly, blankets tucked tightly into the end of the bed are fine - this is because they shouldn't be able to come loose and cover baby's head, loose blankets/ toys/( anything really) are not recommended as they could move and cover babies head blocking their airways.

View Postsuburban dystopia, on 15 March 2018 - 11:04 AM, said:

Recommendations in the US (American Acadmy of Paediattics) are very clear about any blanket use being unsafe. They endorse ‘wearable blankets’ ie sleep sacks only. And they say to cease all firm swaddling around the chest by 8 weeks.

https://www.healthyc...Safe-Sleep.aspx

I imagine our recommendations may also evolve.

This is so confusing then, I wonder what the right thing to do is.  We used blankets and swaddled until 4 months which is what we were shown to do.  Now I'm second guessing this advice!

#31 Daffy2016

Posted 15 March 2018 - 11:49 AM

DD was born in the middle of a cold snap. She had a singlet, onesie, love to dream swaddle, a blanket and (horror of horrors) even a hat. And she slept next to me in a basinette so I could check on her and add another blanket around 3am if needed.

Now she’s moving and in her cot she has a sleep bag.

#32 Kallie88

Posted 15 March 2018 - 11:50 AM

View PostLady Gray, on 15 March 2018 - 11:45 AM, said:




This is so confusing then, I wonder what the right thing to do is.  We used blankets and swaddled until 4 months which is what we were shown to do.  Now I'm second guessing this advice!

It does get confusing, you could take the us advice as avoiding all risk, or current aus guidelines as best practice here and therefore adequate. As a pp above said the us recommendation is likely to avoid incorrect use, so long as you are using blankets + swaddles correctly there shouldn't be anything to worry about.

#33 Prancer is coming

Posted 15 March 2018 - 12:12 PM

Some of us live in parts of Australia that are really cold.  Sleeping bags, even 3 tog, are not going to cut it.  Running the heater all night may not always be an option.  Which leaves blankets as the only way to keep baby warm.

#34 lucky 2

Posted 15 March 2018 - 12:18 PM

I've done some heavy editing, removing a whole conversation that was off thread.

Please move on, any other side track will also be removed.

lucky 2

Moderator

#35 lucky 2

Posted 15 March 2018 - 12:21 PM

Quote

Keep soft objects, loose bedding, or any objects that could increase the risk of entrapment, suffocation, or strangulation out of the baby's sleep area. These include pillows, quilts, comforters, sheepskins, blankets, toys, bumper pads or similar products that attach to crib slats or sides. If you are worried about your baby getting cold, you can use infant sleep clothing, such as a wearable blanket. In general, your baby should be dressed with only one layer more than you are wearing.
I took this from the link provided by pp re American recommendations.
It doesn't say "don't" use blankets, just keep loose bedding out of the cot.

Nothing to be confused about, in Australia we need to look at the Australian SIDs guidelines which also don't support loose bedding. They will change it if and when there is enough research evidence to support a change.

#36 PooksLikeChristmas

Posted 15 March 2018 - 01:11 PM

View Postsuburban dystopia, on 15 March 2018 - 11:04 AM, said:

Recommendations in the US (American Acadmy of Paediattics) are very clear about any blanket use being unsafe. They endorse ‘wearable blankets’ ie sleep sacks only. And they say to cease all firm swaddling around the chest by 8 weeks.

https://www.healthyc...Safe-Sleep.aspx

I imagine our recommendations may also evolve.

That’s clearly not what this link is telling us at all.

The messaging is around loose bedding. And oversized sleeping bag or loose swaddle has the same risk potential as loose blankets.

Identifying that something is preferable is not the same as finding any alternative to be dangerous. I might make that into a tshirt, actually. Where is BadCat?

#37 needs to get out

Posted 15 March 2018 - 04:50 PM

Its not as cut and dried on that particular page as others I've seen.

This is their press release when they changed their recommendations a year or so ago:
https://www.aap.org/...ainst-sids.aspx

Quote


AAP recommendations on creating a safe sleep environment include:
  • Place the baby on his or her back on a firm sleep surface such as a crib or bassinet with a tight-fitting sheet.
  • Avoid use of soft bedding, including crib bumpers, blankets, pillows and soft toys. The crib should be bare.

http://pediatrics.aa...138/5/e20162938

Quote


5. Keep soft objects and loose bedding away from the infant’s sleep area to reduce the risk of SIDS, suffocation, entrapment, and strangulation.

  • Soft objects,19,20,5558 such as pillows and pillow-like toys, quilts, comforters, sheepskins, and loose bedding,4,7,5964 such as blankets and nonfitted sheets, can obstruct an infant’s nose and mouth. An obstructed airway can pose a risk of suffocation, entrapment, or SIDS.

This is the sort of messaging found all over US websites about the AAP recommendations. I know the Australian guidelines differ. Just wanted to show an example of how if the OP has been spending a lot of time on US sites they may well have been led to believe blankets are not recommended under any circumstances, tightly tucked or not.

#38 ~Bob~

Posted 15 March 2018 - 04:56 PM

That's interesting, because I see so many cot bumpers from American photos of baby 'cribs'. Maybe that's changing now.

#39 PooksLikeChristmas

Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:22 PM

Those quote are again talking about soft and loose bedding. I guess I can see why people might get confused but I’m sure their HPs can interpret them into plainer terms if need be. Considering that hospitals in the US use blankets, if a parent were confused that would be a pretty good prompter to discuss.

#40 got my tinsel on

Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:41 PM

When DD was a baby, sleeping bags were out of 'fashion' and finding them in stores was like looking for hen's teeth.

We were given two hand-me downs for 18 months to 2 year olds so had to wait to use them.

Given our old house was bitterly cold in Winter (the interior of the house got down to around 5 degrees overnight), there was simply no solution other than using blankets.

Even then DD's little hands and face were often cool if not cold.

#41 seayork2002

Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:51 PM

View PostPooks Persisted, on 15 March 2018 - 05:22 PM, said:

Those quote are again talking about soft and loose bedding. I guess I can see why people might get confused but I’m sure their HPs can interpret them into plainer terms if need be. Considering that hospitals in the US use blankets, if a parent were confused that would be a pretty good prompter to discuss.

This was not intentional but we ended up bringing DS home with his NHS cotton blanket when he was born (2007) we still have it somewhere

#42 Oriental lily

Posted 15 March 2018 - 06:00 PM

This is what is considered ideal . No loose blankets . I don’t see any reason why this will change . A cold baby and overheated baby is also a sids risk . And like what has been mentioned in some climates even the thickest sleeping bag is not going to cut it .

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#43 suline

Posted 15 March 2018 - 06:49 PM

Maybe the OP is American? I teach safe sleep as part of the NICU discharge talk I work in and I joined a safe sleeping Facebook group that is American based, they do everything to the T in line with the AAP. They are adamantly against any kind of blanket as it’s a suffocation risk, and have got direct clarification from the AAP that this means no blankets.

#44 Caribou

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:38 PM

Just on the SIDs topic,  

How long should a baby sleep with their parents before the SIDs risk is not a risk?

#45 EsmeLennox

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:39 PM

I’m amazed the human race has survived.

#46 Jingleflea

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:18 PM

Caribous, at least 6 months and ideally 12 for the rooming in with the parents.

We managed 7 months before DD grew out of her bassinet. I wish I had a room big enough to fit a cot but alas, no.

#47 Caribou

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:24 PM

View PostJenflea, on 15 March 2018 - 08:18 PM, said:

Caribous, at least 6 months and ideally 12 for the rooming in with the parents.

We managed 7 months before DD grew out of her bassinet. I wish I had a room big enough to fit a cot but alas, no.

Thanks, DS is ten months. He’s been in the cot in our room since. dH is angling for him to leave. I’m hesitant. TBH, it’s been damn convienent to have him a few metres from me overnights for feeds. But DH thinks walking 6 metres isn’t much a of deal to get to DS room.

#48 Franny and Zooey

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:26 PM

How else are you going to keep a baby warm in a cold climate?  I can’t run heating all night and temperatures can get below zero here.

Ridiculous stuff!

#49 AnythingGoes

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:38 PM

I can't imagine that the no blankets recommendations would be achievable for everyone based just on expense. You can get a couple of blankets for the cost of a sleeping bag or two and those blankets will last for years and can be layered etc. The sleeping bags need to be correctly sized and for the correct temperature/season. So in some areas you'd be needing new sleeping bags every six months or so. Even second-hand that's going to add up.

#50 Caribou

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:41 PM

View PostAnythingGoes, on 15 March 2018 - 08:38 PM, said:

I can't imagine that the no blankets recommendations would be achievable for everyone based just on expense. You can get a couple of blankets for the cost of a sleeping bag or two and those blankets will last for years and can be layered etc. The sleeping bags need to be correctly sized and for the correct temperature/season. So in some areas you'd be needing new sleeping bags every six months or so. Even second-hand that's going to add up.

So true. I actually kept DDs sleeping bags. DS is going to be sleeping in hot pink bags when he hits the 18-36m bags. They’re exxy. I’ve been transitioning him to sleeping without them during the day. He sleeps just as well without them on too. Come next summer I expect sleeping bags to be gone.



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