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8 month old screaming at the top of her lungs - for attention or fun. Please help


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#1 PandoBox

Posted 05 July 2018 - 08:10 AM

thanks everyone :)

Seems like the general idea is to ignore it/ model correct behaviour and hopefully it will stop. I definitely don't feel comfortable walking away..but will take on the advice of looking away and stop with the nos.

I also like the idea of signing :yes:

Edited by PandoBox, 05 July 2018 - 02:43 PM.


#2 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 05 July 2018 - 08:55 AM

Even when you are saying No and trying to correct her she is getting attention for the screams.
Just don't.

Walk away when she does it - if it is food pick it up and walk off.

If she wakes go in when she babbles, if she screams ignore her.

Lots and lots of attention when she is not screaming and completely ignoring, withdrawing when she does.

And don't ever reward behaviour you don't want to see continue

#3 seayork2002

Posted 05 July 2018 - 09:10 AM

 Anon100, on 05 July 2018 - 08:55 AM, said:

Even when you are saying No and trying to correct her she is getting attention for the screams.
Just don't.

Walk away when she does it - if it is food pick it up and walk off.

If she wakes go in when she babbles, if she screams ignore her.

Lots and lots of attention when she is not screaming and completely ignoring, withdrawing when she does.

And don't ever reward behaviour you don't want to see continue

all this times a million.

#4 Bono25

Posted 05 July 2018 - 09:21 AM

She's eight months old, not eight years old. It's not attention, she's just playing. Try distraction when she does it, but no way would I be getting up and walking away from a baby. She needs to know you won't just disappear on her. What's walking away going to teach her other than she can't trust you? Ignore it yes, don't respond to it, play with something else, but she won't understand if you start walking away or taking food away.

#5 BeeBop59

Posted 05 July 2018 - 09:29 AM

She sounds like a delightful and very communicative little person!  And I wonder if she's just expressing herself in the only way she knows how right now...?  I can see how frequent screaming would be very challenging for you though!!  But she may not really understand that her voice is loud at these times and that this is a problem.

She can't learn the appropriate thing to do without someone teaching her what that is, so could you perhaps teach her about her voice and volume?

Could you play games with her making noises of different volume?  Could you teach her what "loud voice", "medium" or "middle" or "normal voice" is and what "quiet voice" is by demonstrating it playfully and encouraging her to copy, and then really praising her when she does the same as you and the word?  

If you are able to teach her these words, then instead of saying "no" when she does it, you could ask her to do "quiet voice" or "middle voice", and really praise her when she does that.  That way you aren't telling her not to communicate with you or teaching her that expressing herself is naughty or wrong, but you are teaching her about how to do it at an appropriate volume and contexts when different volumes of voice are appropriate.  

It may also help to give her times in the day when she can play loudly and naming it that way 'let's do some loud playing!" - so she knows it's an ok time - e.g. playing with pots and pans or musical instruments.  That will meet her need for being a bit loud (it is FUN to be loud when you're 8 months old!!) and she will, over time, learn when different volumes are appropriate or not.

She is still so teeny and it takes years for kids to be able to regulate their voices and behaviour, so this may take a bit of time, but it may be a positive and playful alternative for managing this.

Good luck!!

#6 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 05 July 2018 - 09:31 AM

When My 8 month old bit while I was feeding him I took him off, put him on the ground and walked away - for less than 30 seconds. He only did it once.

It is not so much a fact of doing the screaming FOR attention.
But if she gets the attention when she screams she learns to associate the two. Ignore the screaming and remove yourself and she will then associate screaming with mum not being around. I'm not suggesting go out to the shops, leave the room or the table for 30 secs

#7 Ellie bean

Posted 05 July 2018 - 09:31 AM

Earplugs are your friend!

#8 Mmmcheese

Posted 05 July 2018 - 09:45 AM

I would put my hands over my ears, make a sad face and shake my head. I can't remember 8 months very well, but she'd be looking at your face for communication cues? Lots of talking and back forth babbling is good to. She's looking to engage because that's what babies do, she'll learn the right way with lots of practice.

#9 Jenflea

Posted 05 July 2018 - 10:26 AM

Saying "no" to an 8 month old doesn't mean anything to them. They don't know what it means, it's just a sound.

With kids you need to tell them what to do, not what not to do. So say to her "Ssshh, use your quiet voice" and model what a quiet voice is by speaking low and quietly instead of saying "Don't scream".

But she's also 8 months old and has just discovered her voice.
She can't be expected to talk like an adult and moderate her volume like an adult would, she's a baby.

#10 Chaotic Pogo

Posted 05 July 2018 - 10:29 AM

Earplugs are your friend

#11 alchetta

Posted 05 July 2018 - 10:55 AM

Ignore it.
You don't have to leave the room, just stop looking at her, don't say anything, turn your back and/or carry on with whatever else you need to do.
She will ramp it up and up and push you until you react again because she will want to experiment and find out what happens.
When she goes quiet again, start interacting with her again but start ignoring again once she screams again.
It might take time but hopefully she'll get it and move on if you just keep ignoring it. For now it's still too much fun.
You can also start teaching her other new noises while she's not screaming, like lip trills, kisses, clicks, anything you find preferable to screaming.

#12 snowflakedoll

Posted 05 July 2018 - 01:30 PM

I’ve got an 11 month old boy who has been doing the same exact thing by the sounds of it. I’ve started signing to him, like more food? Milk? Drink? All done? We will clean you up now. My 4yo is on board too. His screaming improved almost immediately with us using sign language.

#13 RochelleRochelle

Posted 05 July 2018 - 03:04 PM

Maybe try to teach some new sounds and work on reacting positively to them. My 8mo is a bit of a shrieker, but also likes clicking and blowing raspberries, so we do lots of positive interaction with those sounds. He seems to have gotten over the novelty of shrieking now.




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