Jump to content

Allergic child given allergen twice at childcare


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Miss Potts

Posted 22 August 2018 - 06:08 PM

My DD is FPIES to dairy. It’s an allergy but it’s not anaphylactic (thankfully!), instead she gets desperately ill like severe gastro & an awful rash on her face & mouth. It’s horrible for her and for us.

She’s been at her current child care center for 2.5 years, twice in the last 4 weeks she’s been given dairy, the most recent being today. She’s come home with the tell tale rash and I’m preparing for a night of vomiting.

I’m furious! Is there somewhere I can report them to? I’m going to be emailing head office in the morning but I don’t feel that’s enough. I have no confidence they they are looking out for her!

Any advice would be appreciated.

#2 Riotproof

Posted 22 August 2018 - 06:18 PM

I think you need a meeting with the director to outlive your concerns about each incident.


I think you should find who to contact here https://www.acecqa.g...atory-authority

#3 Mmmcheese

Posted 22 August 2018 - 06:19 PM

Depends which state you're in. If you're in Vic you can report to DET (department of education and training.) If you google childcare compliants and your state, hopefully it comes up with the right phone number. Sorry this has happened to you and your little one.

#4 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 22 August 2018 - 06:26 PM

The complaints process is usually contact the centre first, then head office then DET.

They should have a complaints process on the wall in the foyer.

Have they had new staff?

#5 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 22 August 2018 - 06:39 PM

That’s horrifying. If it can happen for your child, it indicates that their procedures are lacking and potentially an anaphylactic child could be given an allergen. Good luck with it all. Hope the vomiting isn’t as bad as usual.

#6 opethmum

Posted 22 August 2018 - 06:42 PM

I would approach the director immediately and have a word with them if not already. It would seem that someone is not supervising the room correctly at meal times. It is easy for kids to share food and cause cross contamination issues, it the room was supervised and had carers active in preventing the cross contamination from occurring and the consumption of dairy products.

If the centre does not take your concerns seriously then if it part of a chain or over seen by council then make the appropriate complaints there.

Good luck and I hope your little one recovers quickly and the consumption was minimal.

#7 MrsLexiK

Posted 22 August 2018 - 07:18 PM

My oldest was FPIES to soy. On one occasion he was offered soy yoghurt (but didn’t take it) by a carer who knew he was dairy free but didn’t realise the soy issue as he wasn’t in his usual room and she wasn’t a usual to stay and do the late shift. I rang the director the next day just to clarify what I was told. They were so apologetic and they actually changed their practises so it wouldn’t happen again. And IME with my 2 it hasn’t. They also seem to have a bunch more kids with FPIES and ana not just allergies and intolerances. They have such clear signing in each room, and on each trolley, and in the morning and afternoon book.
TBH after the first and second time of it happening I wouldn’t be given them a third chance. My DS1 nearly ended up in hospital on a drip due to FPIES once he did his challenge in hospital for it in case he hadn’t grown out of it.

#8 AdelTwins

Posted 22 August 2018 - 07:22 PM

Before you report, maybe just double check what form of dairy she had and if she grabbed it off another plate. How much does she have to have to cause a reaction?

In that case I would expect an immediate call from the centre. I’d be very concerned if you didn’t find out about it until that night or weren’t told at all.

#9 Miss Potts

Posted 22 August 2018 - 07:46 PM

Thanks everyone for all the information.

The first time I had an in depth meeting with the (new) centre Manager who assured me it would never happen again and she would be changing processes. That manager is no longer there, having left abruptly a week and a half ago. The centre has been through 3 managers in 12 months, so I’m guessing there’s bigger things at play.

On both occasions her usual carers weren’t in the room at the time and fill in carers were there. She is usually very good with not swapping/sneaking food & will often ask before having something new.

I’m just so disappointed and sad for my DD. I should be able to drop her off each morning without the worry of her having something that will make her sick.

Edited by Miss Potts, 22 August 2018 - 07:47 PM.


#10 Mrs Claus

Posted 22 August 2018 - 07:47 PM

View PostAdelTwins, on 22 August 2018 - 07:22 PM, said:

Before you report, maybe just double check what form of dairy she had and if she grabbed it off another plate. How much does she have to have to cause a reaction?

In that case I would expect an immediate call from the centre. I’d be very concerned if you didn’t find out about it until that night or weren’t told at all.

Surely there would/should be a blanket ban on dairy in that room? So the OPs DD can’t help herself to it by accident

#11 Riotproof

Posted 22 August 2018 - 07:57 PM

View PostMrs Claus, on 22 August 2018 - 07:47 PM, said:

Surely there would/should be a blanket ban on dairy in that room? So the OPs DD can’t help herself to it by accident

Generally not.

#12 zeldazonk

Posted 22 August 2018 - 08:14 PM

I understand the feeling. At my daughter's previous daycare they accidentally gave her another mother's breast milk instead of her soy formula (she was allergic to dairy).

I also saw them leave a toddler unattended who helped herself to another kid's yogurt - she immediately broke out in an awful allergic rash. The carers didn't even notice until I pointed it out.

To be honest, in our case it was that the daycare really wasn't any good. We had the same issues as yours - high turn over of staff and centre managers, lots of substitute carers. Eventually we left and have been much happier since.

Don't be afraid to report it to the department either. It is a serious matter.  In retrospect I should have reported ours.

Edited by zeldazonk, 22 August 2018 - 08:17 PM.


#13 AdelTwins

Posted 22 August 2018 - 08:42 PM

View PostMrs Claus, on 22 August 2018 - 07:47 PM, said:

Surely there would/should be a blanket ban on dairy in that room? So the OPs DD can’t help herself to it by accident
For something like obscure, yes. But Dairy is one of the main food groups and would be a substantial part of the other children’s diets.

With Dairy it’s more likely that the child would have to eat separately. Which would be a real shame.

#14 MrsLexiK

Posted 22 August 2018 - 09:50 PM

View PostAdelTwins, on 22 August 2018 - 07:22 PM, said:

Before you report, maybe just double check what form of dairy she had and if she grabbed it off another plate. How much does she have to have to cause a reaction?

In that case I would expect an immediate call from the centre. I’d be very concerned if you didn’t find out about it until that night or weren’t told at all.
With FPIES all she needs is the tinniest amount. My DS1 first reaction was to a meal with tinniest bit of soy sauce, second was with a sandwich which had soy.

And at 4 I assume the OP’s child is well versed on no dairy.

#15 Prancer is coming

Posted 22 August 2018 - 10:22 PM

I feel for you OP.  I have had similar issues with school stuffing up my kid’s allergies.  I tried to follow it up at a school level, but wish now I had been a bit more assertive as there are obviously systematic issues that are not easily resolved it is happened more than once.  I am on the right channel now.

Have a look online at your child care’s website, and they should have a grevience procedure.  I would make an appointment with the director, as most dispute procedures do start with contact with the centre mamagement.  If you are not sure if the procedure, the management should be able to tell you.  I think it is worth telling them what you intend doing too.  Otherwise, have a look at the state authority that overseas child care and they should have a greivence policy too.

Keep fighting!

Edited by Prancer is coming, 22 August 2018 - 10:23 PM.


#16 kimasa

Posted 26 August 2018 - 09:55 PM

View PostMrs Claus, on 22 August 2018 - 07:47 PM, said:



Surely there would/should be a blanket ban on dairy in that room? So the OPs DD can’t help herself to it by accident

My daughter's daycare handles it with colour coordinated plates/cups/cutlery, and a lot of education, plus a group of kids who have dietary issues plus those who the educators feel comfortable with are usually grouped together for meals. She's been in the "allergy group" since a toddler, not because she has any dietary issues, but because I do, so it's an ongoing discussion at home and at daycare so she's quite switched on about it.

With an assortment of dietary requirements, if it's not anaphylaxis it's unlikely to get a blanket ban.

#17 gc_melody

Posted 26 August 2018 - 10:05 PM

Wow, your poor DD. Poor you. I'd be pretty upset about it.
I've had similar happen at a time when there was a high turnover of staff.

When I complained I pointed out that any Educator, before entering a room should be absolutely familiar with each child who has allergies, have their action plan in the room and know what is in it.

I'd be tempted to make this a more formal complaint by making it in writing to the Centre Exec. Irrespective of what State you are in, I'd imagine part of accreditation is on allergy and asthma procedures and compliance. I'd probably make a written complaint to the body who monitors compliance too. Once is bad enough, but twice?

I hope tonight passes quickly and without too much vomiting and distress.

#18 MrsLexiK

Posted 26 August 2018 - 10:13 PM

I’m wondering whether the day care are aware of how serious FPIES is as well. That maybe part of the issue as I’ve had the careers/educators ask me whether my kids can have x y z as other kids have it on special occasions/Easter. So they may see it as “just an intolerance” and a little bit won’t hurt when in reality the tiniest amount for an FPIES is dangerous and can and does land some people in hospital.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.