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Gastric Sleeve


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#1 ~J_WTF~

Posted 27 November 2018 - 10:34 PM

If you have had this done can you tell me about it please? Any regrets? Happy with the outcome? Any issues?

Tell me it all please :)

PS: I don’t want any weight loss surgery haters unless you have had the surgery, if you just want to tell me your opinion on the issue, go elsewhere!!!

#2 Riotproof

Posted 27 November 2018 - 11:28 PM

I have an American friend whose had the surgery and an old school acquaintance. Both seem happy.

The other resource I’d suggest looking at is twosleevers.com. She writes a bit about her experience.

#3 afterlaughter

Posted 27 November 2018 - 11:33 PM

My SIL had the surgery in April, she has no regrets but my observation is that to make it a success it’s a huge commitment. She has to plan her meals to be balanced within the small portion as much as possible, from r example has to plan how she will get in enough protein for the day as well as take a lot of supplements. She has lost a lot of weight and oooks great but not a easy path to take.

#4 BECZ

Posted 28 November 2018 - 03:30 AM

I was talking to the manager of a local plus sized clothing store a few weeks ago and although she doesn't regret it, like PP said, balancing meals etc. is still hard and she had hers done a couple of years ago.  She was showing me the small salad that she had under the counter which she bought at 10am (this was almost 9pm) and she still couldn't finish it.  It's still very awkward for her when it comes to socialising and eating out as she just can't really eat.  She gets very frustrated when people say that it's the easy way out as it's not and it's a life long commitment.  
I think what makes it worse for her is that it didn't fix the medical issue that she had hoped, so she will still have to have surgery for that too, but she has lost lots of weight and I got the impression that she is overall happy.

#5 ~J_WTF~

Posted 28 November 2018 - 09:00 AM

Thanks.

I am ok with the smaller meals and supplements, if needed. Although the people I personally know dont take supplements but I understand it varies.

Its definitely drastic and its a huge commitment, I mean they are taking 75% of your stomach, there is no coming back from that.

#6 born.a.girl

Posted 28 November 2018 - 09:06 AM

Nephew and his wife had it done (sorry, I don't remember which type).  He hasn't been as committed as her, so although his weight has much reduced, his weight has stabilised before getting to a desired weight.  She's been amazing, so committed to eating well (after failing on every 'diet' under the sun) and is now running significant distances.  Very young, both early 30s.  I don't know, but I suspect both would have been categorised as morbidly obese.

#7 Oriental lily

Posted 28 November 2018 - 09:12 AM

Have you watched 600 pound life reality series  ? That show has given me a whole different opinion on it .
I was actually saving up at one stage to get it done but then realised I am not suitable candidate . You can ‘cheat’ to easily , if I needed to I could still overeat even with only 25% of my stomach . I would just munch on twisties and ice cream all day . Just like many of the ‘failures’ on that show do .

If you are a food/carb addict then you will find a way to get your ‘fix’ .

However if your someone with a massive appetite who has no ‘switch’ to stop then it can work well .

Obesity is a complex thing , there is not going to be solution for all .

The idea though that a sleeve will stop you from consuming large amounts of calories is wrong . You need to choose the right calories to consume .

#8 doubledelight

Posted 28 November 2018 - 09:53 AM

I didn't have the sleeve but had a gastric bypass in July 2017.  The change in both my health and lifestyle is amazing.  The only regret I have is that I didn't do it sooner.

It really is no different to any other way of life.  In the early days it can be a little work but you begin to know what your body means.

The bypass means the restriction isn't as severe as the sleeve but I continue to socialise in the same way I always have.

There are a number of really good support groups on Facebook that are a great resource both before, during and after WLS.

#9 Soontobegran

Posted 28 November 2018 - 09:55 AM

View PostOriental lily, on 28 November 2018 - 09:12 AM, said:



The idea though that a sleeve will stop you from consuming large amounts of calories is wrong . You need to choose the right calories to consume .

This is true but a sleeve removes the part of the stomach that secretes the hunger hormone ghrelin and this appears to reduce the need for the sweet or fatty foods.

It is important that people who have a sleeve have great psychological support before and afterwards and this is where I think some people fail. It should be a pre requisite of the surgery.

600lb life does not really represent the type of person who generally have the surgery here in Australia. These people are beyond obese and it will be very much harder for them to turn around a life where they've been consuming 15,000 calories a day. :(

#10 Soontobegran

Posted 28 November 2018 - 09:57 AM

View Post~J_F~, on 27 November 2018 - 10:34 PM, said:

If you have had this done can you tell me about it please? Any regrets? Happy with the outcome? Any issues?

Tell me it all please Posted Image

PS: I don’t want any weight loss surgery haters unless you have had the surgery, if you just want to tell me your opinion on the issue, go elsewhere!!!

I have PM'd you.

#11 Annonomouse3

Posted 28 November 2018 - 05:33 PM

My husband had it done a few years before we met

His meal sizes are very small and he needs to be careful not to overeat or he will sometimes vomit
He can't eat and drink within 30 min of each other

Dining out is probs biggest issue as it is nice to have wine with food etc and when we were overseas their meal sizes are massive

He takes daily supplements

He is very happy he did it even tho he almost died during to operation

Good luck with your decision


#12 JediMaster

Posted 26 December 2018 - 10:39 PM

Hi Op, I don’t mean this as a hater post, and I admit I haven’t had the op myself.

I know 2 people that have had it done. 1 initially lost 40kg in the first year, and she looked amazing. She has put back on about 15kg (3yrs post op) . Would be a size 12-14 now. Has had issues with iron, needing iron transfusions.


The other lost 20kg over the first 2 years and has regained about half that. Would be a size 18. Is able to eat normal to large  portions now.

Both ladies do weigh less than they did initially but are still not happy with their weight.

#13 Crazyhouseholdof6

Posted 27 December 2018 - 10:19 AM

I had it done in 2016. By far the best but hardest thing I’ve ever done. Initially I regretted it for about four months as I couldn’t continue with my old lifestyle, which did revolve around food. But then I started getting out of my comfort zone and started walking and park run and now wish I had done it sooner.
I’ve lost about 70kg and maintain about 76kg which is still overweight by about 1kg but I figure that’s all my saggy skin and I’m so much healthier and happier.
Don’t think it’s the easy way out though. Each day is hard making the right choices as you can put weight on again. This will be a lifelong battle but it’s one I’m happy with fighting. My family is much healthier as there’s no take away and healthier meals although the kids weren’t too happy about that at first. I’m lucky in that I can eat anything still, some people can’t post op and my quantities have increased over the years but I still eat off a side plate and generally don’t eat too many carbs.
By far the best decision I’ve ever made for myself but not the easiest. I say go for it, find a surgeon you ‘click’ with and go for you, you won’t regret it.

#14 Feral-as-Meggs

Posted 27 December 2018 - 10:38 AM

I know a lady who had a large weight loss, and became much more active.  But she is a bit of a drinker and doesn’t take the vitamin supplements, and developed alcoholic neuropathy.  Of course that may have happened in any event.

Edited by Feral-as-Meggs, 27 December 2018 - 10:40 AM.


#15 Silverstreak

Posted 27 December 2018 - 10:40 AM

I haven't had it done myself, but when I was considering getting it done I checked out quite a few you tubers who'd had it done. Some are really informative: they track their weight loss each month, show what they eat each day, how they shop and meal plan etc, as well as preparing your body for the surgery, the surgery itself, recovery time etc. Worth a look.

After surgery, the focus seems to be on eating protein first, then vegetables, then carbs, so a small amount of carbs per day, but all the you tubers are American, not sure if it's different in Australia.

Er, hope that helps a little!

#16 gracie1978

Posted 27 December 2018 - 10:53 AM

I had it done in September and have only lost 18kg so far
Hope to lose another 25 over the next nine months.

I was just getting bigger and bigger, even if I don't lose anymore weight at least I'm a size 18 now with perfect blood work and blood pressure.



Also you're welcome to PM me with any questions.

#17 Kafkaesque

Posted 28 December 2018 - 09:25 AM

I had a sleeve done in August 2017. I’ve lost 50kg. I hated it for the first 6 months. The inability to eat more than a few mouthfuls was a hard adjustment. I can now eat a little more.

I am really happy where I’m at but I can see that I’m allowing sh*t eating to creep back in. I need to get on top of it.

Loving the comments from those that haven’t had it 😒

#18 SeaPrincess

Posted 28 December 2018 - 10:19 AM

My boss had a gastric sleeve and is absolutely thrilled with the results. She’s maintained her goal weight for over a year now, and has no regrets. Her main motivation was her health, so has also incorporated full lifestyle changes in terms of diet, exercise, etc.

#19 Soontobegran

Posted 29 December 2018 - 06:49 PM

View PostJediMaster, on 26 December 2018 - 10:39 PM, said:

Hi Op, I don’t mean this as a hater post, and I admit I haven’t had the op myself.

I know 2 people that have had it done. 1 initially lost 40kg in the first year, and she looked amazing. She has put back on about 15kg (3yrs post op) . Would be a size 12-14 now. Has had issues with iron, needing iron transfusions.

It is most unusual to have iron issues from a gastric sleeve it may be related to menstrual issues rather than poor iron absorption from her diet.

#20 Mummy_Em

Posted 30 December 2018 - 02:21 AM

View PostSoontobegran, on 28 November 2018 - 09:55 AM, said:

This is true but a sleeve removes the part of the stomach that secretes the hunger hormone ghrelin and this appears to reduce the need for the sweet or fatty foods.

It is important that people who have a sleeve have great psychological support before and afterwards and this is where I think some people fail. It should be a pre requisite of the surgery.

600lb life does not really represent the type of person who generally have the surgery here in Australia. These people are beyond obese and it will be very much harder for them to turn around a life where they've been consuming 15,000 calories a day. :(

That is good to know, I was wondering about this too.

I know one person who has had it done and is very happy. Another person who had it done and developed a pouch at the top of the sleeve and had to have another surgery. I don't know whether the pouch is caused by something she did or a common issue. My dad had the band, he has over-ridden it, continued to overeat and a decade or so later put back on all of the weight he lost. But I think it had actually helped with his diabetes, at least for the time he weighed less. I know that the band is easier to over-ride than the sleeve, because it just narrows the top of the stomach. He also has severe reflux, and from what I have heard reflux can be an issue with the sleeve too.

I've been thinking about this myself, but part of what is holding me back is the cost, and concerns about whether I would be a suitable candidate (can only ask, I guess.)

Edited by Mummy_Em, 30 December 2018 - 02:22 AM.


#21 gracie1978

Posted 30 December 2018 - 06:41 AM

Yes some ghrelin is removed but it is also produced in other parts of the body.

I have had no reduction in craving for sweet or fatty foods, I just get full faster.  But it's a different kind of full and you have to pay close attention to your body.

I've literally spat out a mouthful of food because I've realized as I'm chewing that I'm already full.

I'm three months out and absolutely get hungry again.

The band is a nightmare, it fails people and you feel like you're choking.  This is so much better than the band.

Your surgeon can help you decide on the best option.

The results are better and faster with bypass but at least with the sleeve you're less likely to end up with malnutrition.  You can also go on to have a bypass post sleeve.

If you're obese andyou really want to lose weight than I'd recommend it.  It's important to get a surgery who offers great support.  



#22 Soontobegran

Posted 30 December 2018 - 08:52 AM

View Postgracie1978, on 30 December 2018 - 06:41 AM, said:

Yes some ghrelin is removed but it is also produced in other parts of the body.

I have had no reduction in craving for sweet or fatty foods, I just get full faster.  But it's a different kind of full and you have to pay close attention to your body.


The majority of Ghrelin is produced in the stomach with small amounts in the pancreas and small bowel but everyone will be different in amounts for sure.
I guess the psychological craving is hard to beat as well but those close to me who've had a sleeve definitely have little desire for eating almost everything they'd craved beforehand which was horrible fatty foods in the most part.

It is has become an extremely common surgery around these parts. I am not sure whether this is a good thing but I support anyone's choice to do so and the results I have seen have been wonderful.

#23 nom_de_plume

Posted 30 December 2018 - 10:17 AM

I have not had the surgery and am not a hater, but can offer a health practitioner point of view. I have worked for a number of years with bariatric patients in both the prehab and rehab phases.

The patients that have the most success are those that continue to engage regularly with their surgeon, GP, specialists and allied health practitioners post surgery. Those who don’t fully address the underlying physiological and psychological issues that have led to their weight gain are the ones who struggle.

For the most part, the surgery has overall positive health outcomes (reduced weight, reduced BP, lower risk for metabolic disorders) even if the patient doesn’t reach their goal weight.

#24 ilovethebeach

Posted 30 December 2018 - 11:41 AM

I’ve had the bypass in July 2018, had a few rare complications that have been sorted now so first few months were rocky. I’ve lost 40kg, would like to loose another 35kg. Haven’t found the diet modifications too hard. Can socially eat & drink fine. Highly recommend it & happy to be pmd if anyone has questions 😁




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