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Lost 16kgs....put most of it back on


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#26 zenkitty

Posted 02 February 2019 - 12:47 PM

I understand how disappointing it is. 10 years ago I lost 30kg and managed to stay within about 5kg of my new (still overweight) weight. Then a few years ago I started a different job which makes me pretty miserable at times, and is less active. 10kg crept on. Then I took antidepressants for a year. Another 10kg crept on. I am so p*ssed off with myself for letting it happen!

The only thing that helps is that I know I did it once so I believe I can do it again. I need structure, I plug in what I am going to eat for the day in a calorie counter and I act like that is the only option for weekdays. I relax a little on weekends. It is slow but steady. I did need to have a bit of a breakdown about my weight to start the weight loss process again, but I now feel like this is what I HAVE to do if I don’t want to be sore and tired.

#27 Mozzie1

Posted 02 February 2019 - 12:53 PM

View PostRainyeyes, on 02 February 2019 - 10:37 AM, said:

I am currently in the exact same position as you, I get so annoyed that I was within a couple of kg of my goal weight and then boom back up and then some.

I defiantly agree with BBC and that is my biggest issue that because I want to get back on track I binge then diet for a few days to a couple of weeks fall of the wagon and then start the process all over again.

I am also a big believer in that my body has a weight it likes to be at as even once I got over that just cutting out the cycle of binging but not eating healthy my weight slowing retuned to that weight which was nice but now its been almost 6 months of losing few gaining a few, I am so sick of seeing the same number on that scale!

I have no advice, but I am starting again and in the stage of losing the first few and hopeful that with a fortnightly meal plan DH and I made that not planning and constantly thinking about what I am eating will help and this is sort of what I did the first time.


Insulin is the hormone that determines your body's 'natural' weight. This is why low carb diets work so well, because they reduce your body's insulin levels.

#28 night jasmine

Posted 02 February 2019 - 01:46 PM

View PostFeral33, on 02 February 2019 - 12:16 PM, said:

When you lose weight, the levels of more than 10 hormones change that increase hunger. This stays for 6+ years after losing weight (probably forever).

https://www.nejm.org...6/nejmoa1105816

This may not be helpful but at least you know why you are eating even if you don't "want" to.
I do believe in the body weight set point theory, and that your body will try to creep back to the weight it is used to sitting at. However, the set point can be adjusted over time provided each new weight is maintained for a while.

#29 SCG23

Posted 02 February 2019 - 03:58 PM

I, too, have lost a significant amount of weight several times and ended up putting it back on and more. Boredom, a job I despise at times, the pressures of life and even the fact I can eat a full meal and not at all feel like I have eaten makes it really hard.

I'm on my weight-loss journey again and know I've been lucky to date with my health, so working toward losing it and keeping it off (the real struggle for me). I have no real advice other than to keep at it.  I know I can do it so will manage to again.

Avoiding carbs really helps me: I don't feel bloated when I don't eat bread, rice and pasta, and I replace them with lots of veges.

Find something you can do to keep yourself busy. Have a drink instead when you feel you want to eat. I love a cup of tea - it seems to replace my need to eat something sweet, especially after dinner.

I don't want to be at the age when we finally have the time and money to be able to travel but that my health is too poor to actually do it. That's my current motivation as well as those Facebook photos relatives kindly posted at Xmas have spurred me on the last 4 weeks. My skin is clearer, my brain less foggy, and I have more energy and motivation to tackle the long list of things I need to do.

I try to focus on what I can gain when I want to stuff food in my mouth.

Good luck with it. You Can Do It :)

Edited by SCG23, 02 February 2019 - 04:01 PM.


#30 RemyBlue

Posted 02 February 2019 - 04:00 PM

View Postreesan, on 02 February 2019 - 10:12 AM, said:

I'm a big foodie so I guess I'm on the hunt for the right balance of health, the joy of food, and my weight. I've been doing a lot of meal prep the whole time which was great and last year ate a lot more vegan and vegetarian.

Anyway I feel you. Maintenance is harder than losing so ideally you're loseit plan should have a big component of a way of eating you like and stand behind.


Thank you Reesan. You’re absolutely right about the changes I make needing to be sustainable. This is what I was trying to do last year. Smaller portions, cooking with better fats, not using them unnecessarily. Stopping unhealthy snacking between meals and dinner. I don’t eat a lot of meat but don’t think I could forgo dairy. I was very good at my meal planning and prepping. I just need to get focused again but as you say this time I need to be more realistic and think about how I can find the find balance where I don’t feel so deprived and can still enjoy food as a part of social life etc.

#31 RemyBlue

Posted 02 February 2019 - 04:05 PM

View Post.Jerry., on 02 February 2019 - 10:19 AM, said:

I’ve lost 16kg since May and determined to keep it off and lose 4 more. I plateaued over Xmas. Trying to keep on track.

I recommended calorie counting but also keeping perspective and not restricting too much.
I love the info on Diet vs Disease with Joe Leech. He’s on Instagram and facet. So balanced. And shows you can have treat food and still lose weight.

Well done Jerry! That’s fantastic.

Reading through everyone’s replies I think I can see now that I was being too restrictive. I think the more it was working and the weight was coming off the harder I was being on myself then I eventually couldn’t go on. I will check out Joe Leech. Thank you.

#32 RemyBlue

Posted 02 February 2019 - 04:14 PM

View Postkpingitquiet, on 02 February 2019 - 12:18 PM, said:


So, all this yammering boils down to say... find your triggers, be honest with yourself, and work around/with them. For the first time in years I do not feel like I'm suffering at all to maintain my routine. I don't feel pressured or deprived. Who knows how long it'll keep working but I'm happy to do this forever, as I really like it!

Kpingitquiet thank you for sharing your routines and tips. It’s very helpful to hear what others are doing. I find a good routine works for me too. I don’t get bored of it but yes I understand what you are saying about things like eating a nice breakfast with the kids and not counting calories on weekends etc. I just have to make sure I don’t use that as an excuse to go crazy haha.

#33 4kids mostlysane

Posted 02 February 2019 - 04:27 PM

I think it's really important that whatever you do, it's sustainable over time.... I lost nearly 30kgs after baby no 3 and everyone was telling me I was starting to look "too skinny" for the first time ever.  I was obsessed with getting the gym just about every day to the point I would decline social events if they clashed with my gym schedule.  And I was obsessive about what I put in my mouth.

Then I tore a calf muscle quite badly, couldn't exercise for several weeks and it started to go downhill from there, add in a loss, and another baby (and after the loss I was paranoid so did barely any exercise at all).  Fast forward to 10 years later and I'm probably close to the biggest weight I have been.

However I am trying.  I don't have the energy to obsessively do anything these days (let alone count the food that goes in my mouth) and I am trying to walk 3-4 times a week.  It's hard when you work and have kids to coordinate plus housework activities as well.  

Don't be too hard on yourself, set yourself with sustainable goals and set little short term goals.

Good luck xx

#34 WaitForMe

Posted 02 February 2019 - 04:40 PM

I don't know if its just me but I find its a bit easier to lose weight recently gained, than weight I've had for a long time.

#35 unicycle

Posted 02 February 2019 - 04:51 PM

View PostWaitForMe, on 02 February 2019 - 04:40 PM, said:

I don't know if its just me but I find its a bit easier to lose weight recently gained, than weight I've had for a long time.

I was just about to come in and say this. Absolutely I do find this to be the case.

I also wanted to mention that it is a great idea to get this sorted before menopause comes along.

I find it all but impossible to gain muscle now I am menopausal, so don't want to lose weight as muscle goes with weight loss. But, my metabolism is much slower, I'd guess I can eat 2/3 of what I was previously eating with no other llifestyle changes ie I am still exercising, working

Edited by unicycle, 02 February 2019 - 04:51 PM.


#36 born.a.girl

Posted 02 February 2019 - 05:12 PM

View Postnight jasmine, on 02 February 2019 - 01:46 PM, said:

I do believe in the body weight set point theory, and that your body will try to creep back to the weight it is used to sitting at. However, the set point can be adjusted over time provided each new weight is maintained for a while.


I read some research (too vague as to where, to quote) which said that it takes up to two years for the body to adjust to the new weight.

It does make sense, then, that the hardest part is maintaining the weight loss.

It doesn't help that as we age we need less food, and burn less through exercise.  My basal metabolic rate is 1100 calories, any more and I need to exercise to offset it.

It's pretty depressing, but holding on to that face means I'm (so far) managing to keep off the 7kg I lost over 3 x months.  Damned hard work, and not eating any where near as much as I did when I was stable at this weight for most of my life.

#37 night jasmine

Posted 02 February 2019 - 05:25 PM

Yeah definitely maintaining the new weight is the hardest part.

That’s why fads and dropping whole groups of food don’t work in the long run. It’s better to slowly lose weight through lifestyle changes rather than excessive restrictions or impositions like lots of exercise. Once we stop, the weight comes back. It has to be something that can be adopted for good.

I do believe significant weight loss is doable, but it’s hard.

#38 Mrs Twit

Posted 02 February 2019 - 05:26 PM

Just skimmed thru the comments above and I don't think anyone else mentioned it but I did Weight Watchers last year and it changed the way I view eating and the type of food I eat. I find it really good because nothing is off limits, but you just have to work it into your points allowance for the day/week. Because nothing is off limits you don't feel deprived, you work out the 'treats' you want to have and make it work.

I did it online and there is an amazingly supportive online family. People are inspirational, they share their stories, recipes, places to find certain food, ideas for meals etc. No question or comment is too embarrassing or dumb to ask. Everyone is going through the same thing so they understand!

Oh and due to the new habits I have learnt maintenance (5 months so far) has been relatively easy.

#39 swimmingalong

Posted 02 February 2019 - 07:09 PM

There is a phydiological reason that weight goes back on. Have you ever wondered why there has never been a biggest loser reunion? They all got overweight again.

Byes, you lose weight but calorie counting diets slow your metabolism down. The body learns to run on less food and then you have to eat less and less and it slows even more. It hasnt learnt to use its own fuel which doesnt slow metabolism, it gets more efficient.

Read The Obesity Code from Dr Jason Fung

#40 RemyBlue

Posted 02 February 2019 - 10:24 PM

Thank you so much to everyone who has contributed to this thread. I have read and re-read every single word of every post. I have felt inspired and in awe of others achievements, the frustration of others set backs. I am grateful for the insights and advice, tips, ideas, tried and tested and failures. I appreciate the openness and honesty in everyone’s posts on what is a difficult topic.

I have lots to think about and work on. I feel encouraged and motivated. I’ve had a good day today. I feel positive and that this thread has helped me clear my mind, find a new plan and help me get back on that path. The support is very appreciated. I’m so glad I posted now. I was worried about embarrassing myself at first and just hoped there was someone out there who got it. I’ve neen blown away but how many of you were willing to share to help me and others.

Let’s see how I go!! I hope everyone else can maintain, get back on track, or find happiness with where they are at.

#41 Overtherainbow

Posted 02 February 2019 - 11:11 PM

Been there done that. I’m back on the wagon. I find for me it’s about retraining my taste buds and logging calories. I’ve been following Dr Axe on fb and find his advice motivational; not just for weight, but health.

Try changing some of the snacks as a start. I’m enjoying sesame seeds and have switched to 78% choc. Finding food much sweeter. I’ve also found sour dough much better than bread for avoiding bloat.

#42 Sancti-claws

Posted 03 February 2019 - 08:05 AM

I am currently losing with 5:2 - it works for some and not for others, which I think is something to take on board with any regime - finding the one that works for you is the key.

You did well when you planned your days - this is the winning strategy for me too - I don't obsessively calorie count on my NFDs (I do count on occasion so that I know what my healthy amount looks like) but I have my fast days planned down to the last cup of tea.

My ex (who had schizophrenia, which may or may not have contributed to this) theorised that you laid memories down with fat layers, and so issues that may have contributed to you putting on weight in the first place need to be resolved as you get back to that weight otherwise you will be compelled to "cover it up" again.  He may have had a point.

#43 WaitForMe

Posted 03 February 2019 - 08:18 AM

I have a tip thats a bit out there.

Do you have Netflix? Theres this Korean show, Oh My Venus. Its about this girl who is overweight and has health issues, and this guy who is a fitness freak. Its a cheesy romance but its not all image centric (although there is some of that because tv).

Anyway, because the subtext is exercise and eating healthy, theres something about it that motivates me and is kinda relatable. Especially in the start where she is working really hard but losing nothing and talks about all the fad diets she has tried in the past and the stress of her job etc.

#44 FiveAus

Posted 03 February 2019 - 08:26 AM

I lost a fair bit of weight a couple of years ago. I've managed to keep most of it off although a few kgs has crept back on, and I can pinpoint exactly why. Too many "healthy" snacks and too much low fat, low sugar ice cream. Yep, you can overdo healthy.

I did Weight Watchers and also walked every day. I have incorporated both into my lifestyle rather than consider it a weight loss program or a diet. For me, this is life.

I went interstate to work for 2 weeks before Christmas. I was living out of a hotel room, it wasn't easy to maintain a healthy diet, and the local restaurants and takeaway were tempting. By week 2, I had pretty much abandoned any form of healthy eating. I felt sluggish, bloated and couldn't even be bothered to go for a walk.

I went home for a week, and got my act together over Christmas, then went back interstate for another two weeks. This time I had a proper plan, I ordered a Coles grocery delivery to arrive at my hotel the same time as me. The hotel I stayed in that time had a better kitchen, so I cooked all my meals, had a lot of salads, made my lunch every day for work, and undid the damage I'd done the first trip.
I felt a whole lot better and walked every day, sometimes for a very long way in the evenings.

Over time I have found what works for me and what doesn't. I can't have regular bread often, nothing put weight on me like bread. But I can eat flatbread in limited quantities.
I stay right away from salty or sugary foods, because once I start there's no stopping me. Best not to start.
I'm also very sceptical of things like "bliss balls", vegan slices and cakes that are purported as being better for you. They probably are better than the fatty, sugary alternative but they still contain a lot of unnecessary calories.

One of my big downfalls was Medjool dates. They are zero points on the WW scale, and I was eating them every day. Frozen, they are like little caramel bombs. Stuffed with light cream cheese and a couple of salted nuts, they are like a Snickers bar. You can also whizz them up with water and salt and make a salted caramel sauce.
I don't even buy them anymore. They are too tempting and I really don't need temptations like that.

One of the really big things a lot of my friends struggle with is alcohol. Most of it is really high in calories. I don't drink alcohol at all, not for any reason other than I don't like the taste of it and I have never bothered to develop a taste for it. I think part of the reason I've been able to maintain most of my weight loss is that I don't drink, and it's not something to "go back to" once the weight has been lost. Which seems to be the downfall of a lot of my friends.

#45 onyxmoon

Posted 03 February 2019 - 09:26 AM

I've lost 20kg a few years ago and kept it off since then. I fluctuate within 5 kg depending on holidays/time of year etc but the tricks that work for me are:

No restriction but I try and make healthy choices with every meal. Think short term changing your mindset about what you 'like'.
Most meals have protein and vegies with a small portion of carbs. If its not healthy, I try to keep it out of the house. I don't keep pizza or pasta at home - no temptations! I love bread and would happily eat a loaf if left alone with it but I can't if I never bring it into the house in the first place.
That way, I'm allowed to have nice brunches out or a sandwich or another occasional treat but 1 biscuit doesn't turn into 20.
My natural cheapskate tendencies prevent me from buying excessive treats out

When ordering takeout or going out with friends, I try to choose places where there are healthier options. Lebanese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Fish etc. I avoid going to Italian or French or Indian because there are so many tempting calories there

Incidental exercise - I take my toddler to the park but before we leave the stroller, we walk a lap of the park. Don't take the lifts/escalators, there's always stairs and you won't even notice you're doing the exercise. Make use of every sunny day to go for a walk.
Exercise in a way that you like - and schedule it into the calendar. My husband knows that Mondays, Thursdays and Saturday mornings are my time. I get 1 hour to exercise the way I like - a yoga class, a body pump class or a walk. Even if I don't feel like it, I must at least attend. If 30 mins in (or sooner), I'm still not feeling it - I give myself permission to leave.

Stop punishing yourself, stop setting ultimatums (like the diet starts tomorrow) and allow yourself the space to make short term decisions that ultimately play into your long term goals

** oh and it took me 2 years (including 6 months of no walking due to injuries) to lose the 20kg - slow and steady certainly worked for me **

#46 onyxmoon

Posted 03 February 2019 - 09:30 AM

Oh and if its not special, I don't want to waste my 'treat points' on it. All those birthday cakes at the kids birthday parties... I don't even like sickly sweet butter cream icing on plain cake. But when offered, I would always take it.
Then I realised there was no point. If I said no to the birthday cake or the same old tim tams at work (that will always be there), I can have the bombdiggity gelato from the gelati store two suburbs over and feel much less guilt because it was special.

#47 Pocket...

Posted 03 February 2019 - 10:23 AM

Op, I know you said you have chronic health issues so you're probably on top of this but have you had a general check up recently including blood tests for iron, blood sugar, thyroid etc? Just incase something has gone off balance since Christmas?

Also, as much as I hate to say it, as I believe that for most people carbs are a healthy and important part of a balanced diet, they are not good for me. Processed carbs anyway. They make me hungry. I didn't realise it until i cut out processed carbs, as in bread, pasta,rice, sugar, and I felt better and lost weight without getting hungry. I started eating them adhesion at Christmas and boy is it hard to stop. Plus I feel rubbish. Urgh. From a psychological view I could have a slice of cake or chocolate and if be fine because I've never thought of them as a part of healthy eating. In my head they are in a different zone to the other carbs as I've always considered them as part of a healthy diet. I find it difficult to only eat them occasionally as I can't make myself put them in the "occasional treat" section of my brain. Cake, ice-cream and chocolate I can.

I'm by no means saying that this is the same for everyone, I'm not a "low carb is the magic bullet"  person, that's just what happened for me. I do think though that different people react differently to foods and if you can work out if there's a food that makes you feel rubbish and eat healthily around that, that it can be beneficial to long term health, including weight. I also think it's important to look into your individual thoughts and feelings about food. Cake should have a worse effect on me than pasta, physiologically, but mentally it's very different which makes it easier for me to have occasionally without recking everything.

I have to cut out bulk carbs again. I'm not ready yet as I know I'm going to feel bad for a week or two before I feel better. In trying to get myself into a place where I can start next week. I am trying to be realistic about this as, having done it before, I know in the long term I'll feel better for it.

I'm not sure if any of this is helpful to you, but all the best, I'll be trying to get back on track with you so you're not alone.

#48 FiveAus

Posted 03 February 2019 - 12:29 PM

I think one of the big secrets to weight loss and keeping it off, is finding what you can live with, then actually living with it.
And stay away from the extremes, because chances are you won't maintain it even though your weight will come off easily.

I have a friend who regularly jumps on the "no sugar" bandwagon, she goes at it like a bull at a gate, cuts out sugar from everywhere, religiously reads all labels and puts back any food that contains sugar, makes everything from scratch, stops drinking alcohol, and loses a lot of weight.

Then she gets sick of having to spend her weekends making her kids school snacks, gets tired of not drinking alcohol and wants a drink then doesn't stop at one, starts bending the "rules" she's set for herself and before she knows it, the no sugar rule has gone and she's put all the weight back on.

She said recently she's going back to no sugar, and it works. In fact, it doesn't work because she can't maintain it.

#49 SCG23

Posted 03 February 2019 - 03:10 PM

View PostFiveAus, on 03 February 2019 - 12:29 PM, said:

I think one of the big secrets to weight loss and keeping it off, is finding what you can live with, then actually living with it.
And stay away from the extremes, because chances are you won't maintain it even though your weight will come off easily.

I have a friend who regularly jumps on the "no sugar" bandwagon, she goes at it like a bull at a gate, cuts out sugar from everywhere, religiously reads all labels and puts back any food that contains sugar, makes everything from scratch, stops drinking alcohol, and loses a lot of weight.

Then she gets sick of having to spend her weekends making her kids school snacks, gets tired of not drinking alcohol and wants a drink then doesn't stop at one, starts bending the "rules" she's set for herself and before she knows it, the no sugar rule has gone and she's put all the weight back on.

She said recently she's going back to no sugar, and it works. In fact, it doesn't work because she can't maintain it.

The fact of the matter is that to eat in a healthy manner, you have to put time and effort into it. You MUST plan ahead and I know it gets tiresome, just like your friend's story.

I also think it comes down to our lifestyles being so different to a generation or 2 ago: we're so much more sedentary now with so many gadgets to do things for us.

Convenience foods were not so readily available (so cooking from scratch was the norm), but today they're everywhere and cheap. Eating out at coffee shops and restaurants is some people's normal.

And, It can be quite an expensive exercise to eat healthily if you want variety. All of these factors really make it more difficult to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Let's face it: salty, sugary foods are so much yummier than some healthy foods.

Edited by SCG23, 03 February 2019 - 03:11 PM.


#50 FiveAus

Posted 03 February 2019 - 05:13 PM

View PostSCG23, on 03 February 2019 - 03:10 PM, said:

The fact of the matter is that to eat in a healthy manner, you have to put time and effort into it. You MUST plan ahead and I know it gets tiresome, just like your friend's story.

I also think it comes down to our lifestyles being so different to a generation or 2 ago: we're so much more sedentary now with so many gadgets to do things for us.

Convenience foods were not so readily available (so cooking from scratch was the norm), but today they're everywhere and cheap. Eating out at coffee shops and restaurants is some people's normal.

And, It can be quite an expensive exercise to eat healthily if you want variety. All of these factors really make it more difficult to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Let's face it: salty, sugary foods are so much yummier than some healthy foods.

In my friends case, the "no sugar" rule extends to most fruit, so while I consider a piece of fruit a delicious snack, quick and easy to get out of the fridge, rinse and eat, it doesn't fit in with her rules.

So she has to make things like sugar free muffins and slices etc to snack on. Her rules apparently allow her to use things like rice malt syrup, and i could never quite figure out how that was more acceptable than a piece of fruit but there you go. The "no sugar" thing never really sat well with me and doesn't seem to be maintainable over the long term anyway.

I've found that since I switched to a healthier, whole food eating plan, most sugar has gone anyway. We certainly don't use any, and any sugar that I consume would be from fruit and maybe tomato sauce or tinned soup that I have occasionally.




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