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Measles death - Europe


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#1 *Spikey*

Posted 11 February 2019 - 06:16 AM

Light for Riley was asked to share this story.

If you are on the wall, vaccinate.

If you are pro-vax, keep up to date (don't forget the adults)

If you are anti-vax, stop it, and get everyone vaccinated before you kill someone.

If you are unable to be vaxxed, please take extreme care. The USA is also experiencing a major outbreak, and it isn't going to take much before we get to the same point.

https://www.dailymai...5Fa1suGaBaVxEkU

#2 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 11 February 2019 - 08:15 AM

Also many people received only one dose of measles vaccine, and for some this isn’t enough to form lasting immunity. I discovered I was one of those people last year.

One morning I got a phone call from the health department, advising that we had been exposed to measles at daycare drop off one day (child too young to be immunized had been infected overseas). DS was 5mo and had been with me at drop off. I was breastfeeding, so DS would have been ok if I had been immune - I had to go and get my immunity urgently checked, and was not immune. The health department then organised for immunoglobulin to be flown across the country so that DS and I could be treated and hopefully prevent us from getting measles. I had to hold my baby as the GP injected immunoglobulin into his tiny bum muscle. I had to have two massive injections into my own bum muscles.

I think the health department needs to do a free booster for everyone who falls into that age group. I vaguely knew about it, but somehow hadn’t been checked despite having my German measles and chicken pox immunity checked pre-pregnancy.  I’ve now had a booster, and was very glad that I’d had it, and that DS had had his first measles vaccination before we went to Europe recently.

Get your immunity status checked, even if you were fully vaccinated as a kid.

#3 Crazy4

Posted 11 February 2019 - 08:19 AM

Have a drs appointment today on something unrelated but will be asking for a booster if my vaccine has worn off. The anti vaxers have the blood of these poor souls on their hands and they are too stupid or too selfish to realise it.

#4 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 11 February 2019 - 08:28 AM

Yes getting immunity status is important.

My mum had zero record of me having the measles vaccine (I was born in the grey area just before it was on the schedule - my older brother had had it due to travel before I was born). No memory of me having had measles either. As I get very strong immune reactions to vaccines I already have had I requested blood test to check immunity. Came back as 100x what is considered necessary for immunity. So maybe I had a shot, maybe I had a very mild version of measles as a child, NFI which but I am immune.

DH on the other hand as he was doing lots of travel to third world countries had vaccinations for everything under the sun. He is a year younger than me but measles was on the schedule then.


#5 EmmDasher

Posted 11 February 2019 - 08:47 AM

Before we started TTC our first I went and had immunity screening so I could get boosters if necessary. I was ok but not immune to CMV which there is no vax for. Interestingly, by my second pregnancy I’d had it so cheers for that daycare.

It is a really obvious point to my mind to get screened and there should be greater promotion/encouragement to do it.

#6 ipsee

Posted 11 February 2019 - 09:54 AM

People born around the 60s and 70s have probably only had a single measles vacc, whereas after that the schedule went to two vaccinations.

We also had a measles scare (hospital waiting room...) and had to rush off to get a second vaccination urgently.

So if you are in that age group it is worth getting a second vaccination for measles.

#7 Jenflea

Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:01 AM

I had the vaxx and then a milder dose of measles according to mum. I've also had my immunity checked before doing IVF and I'm ok. Dh needed to be vaccinated for chicken pox and he was given a few together, don't ask me what though. Possibly they topped up his measles one too.


Both born in 74 but he was born OS where his parents were posted.

#8 AliasMater

Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:02 AM

The Abbott government were never really serious about the betterment of the community, herd immunity, and vaccinatuon rates when they took away benefits from antivaxxers. If they were, they would have put the money saved into an adult vaccination register. The inconvenient truth us that the spread of these preventable diseases is mostly by adults.

Taking those supplement payments was all anti-welfare ideology.

#9 Soontobegran

Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:16 AM

View Postipsee, on 11 February 2019 - 09:54 AM, said:

People born around the 60s and 70s have probably only had a single measles vacc, whereas after that the schedule went to two vaccinations.

We also had a measles scare (hospital waiting room...) and had to rush off to get a second vaccination urgently.

So if you are in that age group it is worth getting a second vaccination for measles.

People born in the 50s/60s and 70s have probably been exposed to or have had the measles and have a natural immunity. I can't think of any of my friends in the 60s who did not get measles.....it was rife. The measles vaccine I believe came out in 1969 here and parents had to pay for it so most didn't.
I remember my entire family having it in about 1965 and we were all bed ridden for nearly 3 weeks with my older brother going to hospital.
The trouble is that those who are anti vax or ambivalent have never lived through an outbreak .....they need to be careful what they wish for. :(

Edited by Soontobegran, 11 February 2019 - 10:23 AM.


#10 Soontobegran

Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:19 AM

View PostAliasMater, on 11 February 2019 - 10:02 AM, said:

If they were, they would have put the money saved into an adult vaccination register. The inconvenient truth us that the spread of these preventable diseases is mostly by adults.



I am sure that there is some spread via adults however I am not sure it is a majority.
Most anti vaxxers are vaccinated themselves.

#11 ipsee

Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:26 AM

I don't remember anyone having measles in the 70s, and it is definitely recommended to have a second measles vax if you are a 70s child.

People born in the 50s are assumed to have natural immunity as there was so much measles around then.

60s - could be a grey area.

#12 AliasMater

Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:34 AM

View PostSoontobegran, on 11 February 2019 - 10:19 AM, said:



I am sure that there is some spread via adults however I am not sure it is a majority.
Most anti vaxxers are vaccinated themselves.

That's the thing, they're probably not. A lot of adults who think they are vaccinated are probably not. Many vaccines need boosters every 10 years. In fact, I've found doctors are saying 5 years for Whooping Cough because it drops off in so many individuals.

#13 Soontobegran

Posted 11 February 2019 - 10:48 AM

View PostAliasMater, on 11 February 2019 - 10:34 AM, said:

That's the thing, they're probably not. A lot of adults who think they are vaccinated are probably not. Many vaccines need boosters every 10 years. In fact, I've found doctors are saying 5 years for Whooping Cough because it drops off in so many individuals.

Every adult of my generation who I know who is a grandparent has had their WC booster but they are also immune to measles/mumps etc due to actually having it as a child. Children who didn't get it were very much more unusual than children who did.
I doubt these people had a measles vaccination after 1969 because they knew they didn't need it.
The measles rates in the 70s was dropping rapidly especially after the introduction of the immunisation program in the mid 70s but there was that few years there between those naturally immune and those immune due to vaccine....I am really testing my memory here but I do not remember an outbreak in this time as significant as this European one which is testament to the harm caused by the anti vaxx. idiots.
Our kids were all born in the 80s....all were vaccinated on schedule and caught up with the extras as they were introduced. I did not know any anti vaxxers in this time as so many of the adults had very vivid memories of the actual diseases and were extremely grateful they existed.

efs

Edited by Soontobegran, 11 February 2019 - 10:49 AM.


#14 Safety Queen

Posted 11 February 2019 - 11:06 AM

I agree to make sure you check immunity , I don't retain immunity I had a booster after my son and was tested a year or so later no immunity , so before i had my daughter (planned to get pregnant ) I had a booster she is now 2 and no immunity for me.

I got my son tested he has retained his , we are testing my daughter in a couple months to check hers


As some one who has had Shingles and Meningitis both of these were horrible and life changing but I am lucky as I was an adult for both .

#15 WaitForMe

Posted 11 February 2019 - 11:17 AM

Wow what a sad story, that hospital :no2:

I wasn't sure if I'd had my booster as a teen so I decided to get it when I was TTC.

At the time I was in London and wow the NHS are such tightwads, they acted like I was over reacting asking for it but eventually gave it to me.

I wasn't even aware about whooping cough. No mention in the baby books I diligently read, no surprises the NHS didn't mention it, then I moved back to Aus and discussed TTC'ing with GP and still no mention. I didn't get it until after DD1 was born.

#16 annodam

Posted 11 February 2019 - 11:37 AM

I had an MMR shot in 2002 & a DTP/Boostrix in 2009.
Would I need a top up?
I'd get the CP vax too but I'm immune.

#17 dadwasathome

Posted 11 February 2019 - 11:51 AM

I think it’s a testament to ongoing discussion and good sense that our vaccination rates are so high.

As a kid we had family friends who had been disabled by polio, and diphtheria and tetanus were a given as they were available. I suffered measle, mumps, rubella and varicella as a child. Was resuscitated on the way to hospital following rubella related febrile convulsions. Suffered more than one diagnosed dose of measles, including at the time my younger sister was hospitalised with whooping cough.

I have those active memories pushing me in favour of full immunisation - it’s such a valuable gift we have available. I have difficulties being civil about those who oppose.

Edited by dadwasathome, 11 February 2019 - 11:51 AM.


#18 Lalala4

Posted 11 February 2019 - 12:03 PM

My siblings and I definitely had measles along with most of our primary school in 1977 (and possibly because it can trash your immune response to other bugs too, we got chicken pox and rubella the same year). Measles left my brother with permanently scarred lungs (he nearly died aged 5 from related pneumonia).

Measles was the reason my grandmother grew up an only child. It is a nasty, nasty disease and the fewer human homes available for it, the better for everyone.

Preaching to the choir here, I'm sure...

#19 PrincessPeach

Posted 11 February 2019 - 12:20 PM

So from that story, the young child who died was unable to be vaccinated (something the hospital should have known), yet they put her in the same room as a child with an infectious disease.

Yikes!

My SIL is one of those anti-vaccinating numpties. only thing working in her favour currently is that they live remotely, although they currently have whooping cough doing the rounds of the town & they have an unvaccinated 2 month old (as well as older kids).

I was born in 1983 & I've had 2 doses of the measles vaccine, but looking at my clinic book the schedule had obviously changed not that long prior as mum had added it in as an extra. There was no reason for us kids to have gotten extra off schedule vaccines, so I'm assuming a lot of people no much older than me have only had one dose of the measles vaccine.

#20 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 11 February 2019 - 12:36 PM

View PostSoontobegran, on 11 February 2019 - 10:48 AM, said:



Every adult of my generation who I know who is a grandparent has had their WC booster but they are also immune to measles/mumps etc due to actually having it as a child. Children who didn't get it were very much more unusual than children who did.
I doubt these people had a measles vaccination after 1969 because they knew they didn't need it.
The measles rates in the 70s was dropping rapidly especially after the introduction of the immunisation program in the mid 70s but there was that few years there between those naturally immune and those immune due to vaccine....I am really testing my memory here but I do not remember an outbreak in this time as significant as this European one which is testament to the harm caused by the anti vaxx. idiots.
Our kids were all born in the 80s....all were vaccinated on schedule and caught up with the extras as they were introduced. I did not know any anti vaxxers in this time as so many of the adults had very vivid memories of the actual diseases and were extremely grateful they existed.

efs

I was born in the early 80s and was vaccinated on schedule. The schedule only had one measles vaccination for a period of time, and I and many others fall into that. Here’s a piece about it:

https://www.theguard...against-measles

#21 hills mum bec

Posted 11 February 2019 - 12:48 PM

View Postipsee, on 11 February 2019 - 10:26 AM, said:

I don't remember anyone having measles in the 70s, and it is definitely recommended to have a second measles vax if you are a 70s child.

People born in the 50s are assumed to have natural immunity as there was so much measles around then.

60s - could be a grey area.

I don't know how prevalent measles was in the 70s but I have a friend with a brother that caught measles in the early 70's when he was 18m that caused severe brain damage.  He is now in his late 40's, non verbal and will need constant care for the rest of his life.

#22 #mocha

Posted 11 February 2019 - 01:11 PM

Why didn’t the hospital put the boy in isolation?

#23 ipsee

Posted 11 February 2019 - 01:19 PM

Most vaccinations don't need to be topped up. Whooping cough and tetanus every 10 years are the only ones that do I think.

Measles you need two doses of vaccine in a lifetime. Now it is on the schedule for two, and you get them both as a child.

But if you were born in the 70s (or close to it) you would have only had one dose of measles vaccine as a child, and you can choose to get another one now to bring you up to full immunity. (I think you have to pay for it.)

The article above states tht ppl aged 52 to 26 may not have had the full two doses of measles vaccine. The younger cohort should have but as the second dose was in high school may have missed out via moving schools etc.

Edited by ipsee, 11 February 2019 - 01:21 PM.


#24 kadoodle

Posted 11 February 2019 - 02:10 PM

View Posthills mum bec, on 11 February 2019 - 12:48 PM, said:



I don't know how prevalent measles was in the 70s but I have a friend with a brother that caught measles in the early 70's when he was 18m that caused severe brain damage.  He is now in his late 40's, non verbal and will need constant care for the rest of his life.

I worked in a children’s hospice in the UK. So many kids with brain damage post Wakefield’s paper, they should have sued the b*st*rd to recover the costs.

#25 Mollycoddle

Posted 11 February 2019 - 02:25 PM

Yes I'm even more pro-vax since my sister was diagnosed with leukemia and her immune system is pretty much shot.  Sometimes it doesn't hit home until it personally affects you.




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