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First year of High School 2020


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#26 dadwasathome

Posted 27 February 2019 - 12:35 PM

View PostOctopodes, on 27 February 2019 - 11:38 AM, said:

One test is scheduled for the morning of state election day, interesting choice by the school.

The selective school test is the morning after DS11's 3 day yr 6 camp....

#27 Octopodes

Posted 27 February 2019 - 12:57 PM

View Postdadwasathome, on 27 February 2019 - 12:35 PM, said:

The selective school test is the morning after DS11's 3 day yr 6 camp....
Interesting scheduling for camp!

#28 dadwasathome

Posted 27 February 2019 - 02:24 PM

View PostOctopodes, on 27 February 2019 - 12:57 PM, said:

Interesting scheduling for camp!

A few kids may be leaving camp
early....

#29 Sincerely

Posted 27 February 2019 - 07:27 PM

View Postdadwasathome, on 27 February 2019 - 12:35 PM, said:

The selective school test is the morning after DS11's 3 day yr 6 camp....

Is it a private school (which may be trying to hold on to their best pupils)?

#30 unicycle

Posted 27 February 2019 - 09:52 PM

Or a school that was late locking in its camp dates and this was the only week available?

#31 Kreme

Posted 28 February 2019 - 07:42 AM

View Postdadwasathome, on 27 February 2019 - 12:35 PM, said:



The selective school test is the morning after DS11's 3 day yr 6 camp....

Oh dear, that’s bad timing. Our school will have 50 kids sitting the selective test. I think the camp would have been very quiet!

#32 Octopodes

Posted 28 February 2019 - 11:23 AM

View PostKreme, on 28 February 2019 - 07:42 AM, said:

Oh dear, that’s bad timing. Our school will have 50 kids sitting the selective test. I think the camp would have been very quiet!
Wow that is a lot of kids! That is almost as many Year 6 kids as our school has this year. We have about 10 out of 60ish students sitting the test. The school is in a lower socio-economic area. We also tend to lose our smart stage 3 kids to schools with opportunity classes in surrounding suburbs.

Edited by Octopodes, 28 February 2019 - 11:23 AM.


#33 amdirel

Posted 28 February 2019 - 03:56 PM

Well DS2 is feeling pretty chuffed this week as he has joined the high school band already! He may play in the marching band for the big ANZAC day service but is a bit unsure. It's nice though for him to be able to go to the school every week and be around some of the older kids and the music teachers. It also helps us with our out of area application!
This is presuming he doesn't go to the selective school.

#34 Kreme

Posted 28 February 2019 - 04:26 PM

View PostOctopodes, on 28 February 2019 - 11:23 AM, said:

Wow that is a lot of kids! That is almost as many Year 6 kids as our school has this year. We have about 10 out of 60ish students sitting the test. The school is in a lower socio-economic area. We also tend to lose our smart stage 3 kids to schools with opportunity classes in surrounding suburbs.

Our school has around 130 year 6 kids I think. Typically around 30 kids will get a selective place.

#35 dadwasathome

Posted 28 February 2019 - 04:31 PM

View PostSincerely, on 27 February 2019 - 07:27 PM, said:

Is it a private school (which may be trying to hold on to their best pupils)?

No, local public school. I'm assuming it is mostly poor planning, as at least 20% of kids at the school seem to sit the test.

DP wasn't impressed with the local high school last night, but we don't want to make the selective schools test too "high stakes" for him. There's also another smaller high school nearby that is trying to build enrolments which could also be OK if he doesn't get a selective place.

#36 Sincerely

Posted 28 February 2019 - 08:47 PM

View PostOctopodes, on 28 February 2019 - 11:23 AM, said:

Wow that is a lot of kids! That is almost as many Year 6 kids as our school has this year.

Then, in some selective schools, most of the students are aiming to study Medicine. DD1's English teacher, who previously taught at a top selective school, once told me that on the day of the UMAT exam, the entire class was absent (every single student was sitting the UMAT).

#37 Sincerely

Posted 28 February 2019 - 09:04 PM

View Postdadwasathome, on 28 February 2019 - 04:31 PM, said:

No, local public school. I'm assuming it is mostly poor planning, as at least 20% of kids at the school seem to sit the test.

DP wasn't impressed with the local high school last night, but we don't want to make the selective schools test too "high stakes" for him. There's also another smaller high school nearby that is trying to build enrolments which could also be OK if he doesn't get a selective place.

My sympathies. It's such a shame that students will have to cut short their Yr 6 camp trip. School camps are so much fun.

Edited by Sincerely, 28 February 2019 - 09:07 PM.


#38 RuntotheRiver

Posted 28 February 2019 - 09:13 PM


Different from selective, our local private school had 150 kids sit the Scholarship test on Saturday. Some had scholarship coaching all summer, I’d prefer a kid that didn’t, who really cannot afford p.s to get the scholarship. Think that’s what they were originally for anyway.

#39 ExpatInAsia

Posted 01 March 2019 - 05:55 AM

Our children go to an ELC-Year 12 school so the transition should be smooth. The school does orientation days through out the year so the grade 6 students are more familiar with the senior campus - located next door.

We live a 5 minute walk away from school so no buses required.

#40 seayork2002

Posted 08 March 2019 - 08:26 AM

Went to DS's future high school open day and we were very impressed.

Sure the buildings look like they were built before we were born but it still seems a great school!

I know we should be all grown up about it and think 'school rankings' and HSC results (which are actually very good) BUT all we could think of was the great extra curricular activities they had!

Now it just us thinking how old we feel our 'baby' is going to high school soon

#41 Octopodes

Posted 08 March 2019 - 09:09 PM

Extra curricular activities are important too. We've ruled certain schools out based on their lack of extras. DS has a strong performing arts itch which needs scratching. I think having the right extras often helps keep kids engaged at school through those tough Year 9 and 10 years in particular.

I've got all applications in, the EOI form has gone back to the primary school... selective high school test is next week, G&T tests the week after and then we just have to wait and see where/if he gets in.

#42 tassiekiwi

Posted 24 March 2019 - 12:32 PM

We are heading to the local open night on Thursday. DD has found out that a classmate will likely go to the same school as her next year which she is pleased about. A classmate from last year goes there now and they have been emailing each other so she has already got a good idea on what it will be like.
Any suggestions as to what to look out for at the school as being good points/bad points? I'm going to try and find out about extension work and lunchtime activities.
Good luck to all those sitting entrance tests.

#43 Sincerely

Posted 24 March 2019 - 02:03 PM

View Posttassiekiwi, on 24 March 2019 - 12:32 PM, said:

Any suggestions as to what to look out for at the school as being good points/bad points?

What happens if a students wants to do a subject not offered by the school (a specific language, highest level of maths)?

What extracurricular academic activities is the school involved in (debating team, maths team, STEM team, programming team - our local public HS now offers all of these)?

(Edit: I'm not sure how relevant my suggestions are to your location - ?Tas, ?NZ)

Edited by Sincerely, 24 March 2019 - 02:08 PM.


#44 tassiekiwi

Posted 24 March 2019 - 02:12 PM

Thanks, I will add those points to my list.
We are in regional Tas.

#45 Octopodes

Posted 25 March 2019 - 09:39 AM

Ask questions about things your child is specifically interested in. If they are sporty ask about sport programs, same goes for arts, science, maths, English, g&t programs if your child is gifted or talented... Ask about the subjects offered in Years 11 & 12, not all schools offer all subjects. Ask about learning support programs if your child struggles academically at school. Do they have vocational courses/programs in the upper year levels for kids who are less academically inclined?

A lot of this information they should volunteer in trying to sell you the school, but if they don't, then ask if it is relevant to you.

#46 Kreme

Posted 25 March 2019 - 10:54 AM

We been doing the rounds of local high schools. Some of the things we’ve looked at:

- extra curricular activities available such as chess, music ensembles, a school play or musical
- sports available for my sports mad DS
- elective subjects in later years
- HSC subjects offered and levels
- are junior classes streamed or multi ability
- is there a G&T or extension class
- green space for sport during recess and lunch

There is also a gut feel that you go in after speaking to the staff and seeing the school in action. I don’t tend to listen to other parents’ views because many people are heavily biased towards the school they have chosen and will be overly positive about it and negative towards the alternatives. We’ve come to the conclusion that most of the schools near us are good so we’ve put them into a ranking order, with a couple of out of area options above our local school. DS has done the selective test and the G&T placement test for our local school. And now we wait and he enjoys year 6!


#47 tassiekiwi

Posted 31 March 2019 - 12:13 PM

DD has decided that the school we visited is for her. Her decision seems to be mostly subject based. Her highlights: languages, a good music program, lunchtime clubs (including chess), support a wide range of sports and a canteen.
Though I think her tipping point was when walking through the tech block she spotted a display for a grade 10 robotics class.
They also have a G&T coordinator to provide needed extension in classes but not a separate class which I think suits us well. DD is talented in maths, spelling and music but average with writing.
I'm glad she is thinking of her interests as opposed to going to the same school as her BFF where she would have become frustrated with the attitudes/disruptiveness of others.
Now to wait till enrolments open.

#48 Octopodes

Posted 31 March 2019 - 01:16 PM

Glad you found a school you're all happy with, tassiekiwi.

We, like everyone else applying to selective high schools and g&t classes in NSW, are in limbo until offers come out in July.

#49 Sincerely

Posted 31 March 2019 - 03:25 PM

A lot of other families are in limbo right up to the very start of Yr 7, either hoping to get into a selective school or into one of their higher preferences. I know a couple of families who've never settled as their child(ren) accepted spots in distant selective schools and they keep applying and hoping they can get into a closer SS in Yrs 8-10. It's a terrible system these days.

#50 Octopodes

Posted 31 March 2019 - 04:56 PM

I know a couple of families who will likely reapply each year if they don't get in at Year 7. Both children are average students, but the family pressure to get into selective high schools and then uni courses to become doctors or lawyers is immense even at 10yo.

We are undecided if we will even accept a selective spot if he gets in. We applied to give him/us options, not because we desperately want him to attend a selective high school. If he doesn't get in, he will happily go to the local high school.




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