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Daycare for 2 Children! How will I do it?


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#1 sro

Posted 17 February 2019 - 07:28 PM

Hi all,

Another bub on the way. We both work fulltime and I would like to continue with my job. I am open to part time, if they allow, (not sure about this) but also just thought about possible an aupair?
Have any of you had 2 in daycare or had an aupair for a year? Thanks :)

#2 MrsPuddleduck

Posted 17 February 2019 - 07:38 PM

Congratulations! How old is bub number 1?

I am currently on maternity leave until April; then we will have two in day care until my son starts in prep next year. I’m trying not to think about how much it will cost! Fortunately it’s only for a shortish period of time.

#3 MGB

Posted 17 February 2019 - 07:44 PM

Congratulations on your new baby!

We had 3 in daycare, 3 days a week for a year. Cost a fortune. We rode it out. It was a short period, although it felt like I was working just to cover daycare costs at that time. 2 are now in school and our youngest will start FYOS in a couple of years.

#4 Lallalla

Posted 17 February 2019 - 07:45 PM

Until very recently I had 3 in daycare. It hurt, a lot. If you have the space look into an au pair - nanny’s are expensive! Even with 3 after government debate it wasn’t worth it.

Now with only 2 in daycare it’s fine, it’s expensive but doable - depending on how much you earn of course.

#5 *BellBird*

Posted 17 February 2019 - 07:52 PM

I had 2 in daycare when they were small, it is expensive, no question. I really like Au pairs for bigger kids to help with drop offs/pick ups etc but I don’t think leaving a small baby with an au pair is particularly sensible. They are not trained child care workers, just really kids looking for a way to experience a different country/environment at a reduced cost to the usual route. Congrats & good luck.

#6 NotBitzerMaloney

Posted 17 February 2019 - 08:09 PM

I worked full time so we did a mix of school, daycare and au pair. She did pick up from school and daycare three days and then looked after the youngest for two days per week

#7 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 17 February 2019 - 08:17 PM

I'm assuming you mean how do people afford it?

I had 2 in daycare 3 days a week.  At the time DH and I each earned about 40K so we needed to work to pay the mortgage but we earned low enough to get a fairly high rate of subsidy.

The system has changed since then - to my understanding its easier on people who work full time as they have removed the ridiculously low cap of 7500.  Of course the fees keep going up and Ive heard can easily be $200 a day before rebates in Sydney. Ouch!

#8 maryanneK

Posted 17 February 2019 - 08:23 PM

its perfectly doable, plenty of families do. We did and are about to again.
yes its expensive and takes up a fair chunk of your salary but we still come out miles ahead compared to not working.
How are you placed with child care subsidy? The rebates might be better than you think, especially if you end up working part time which will lower your family income and increase your subsidy percentage.

I like the proper childhood education and trained staff at day care compared to an au pair. Also we dont have any spare room for an au pair!

#9 Future-self

Posted 17 February 2019 - 08:27 PM

I assume you mean financially? It’s the usual in my circles and for many/most as the average gaps between children have a crossover of both needing to be in care. So the strain of 2 x fees is quite usual.

If PT is an option for your workplace then for me it’s a no brainer if the numbers add up. 3 days was what worked for my workplace, my involvement in work, the financials of fees and outgoings and the time then I could spend with my kids.
An au pair is not designed to look after children full time. They aren’t qualified for starters , can only work a certain number of hours per week and are often only looking for short-termr (6 months) which isn’t ideal for small children and stability.

#10 harryhoo

Posted 17 February 2019 - 08:51 PM

You could look at a community based childcare/preschool. We have 2 in our small town and their opening hours are 8.30-4pm. It's $32 a day or less if you have a 3 or 4 year old in NSW who goes for atleast 600 hours a year (2 days a week). I had a babysitter last year who would pick my eldest up from school and walk to preschool to pick up my 3 year old. She'd then take them to the park or library until finished work (which is about 4.30pm). But it's a juggle!!

#11 sro

Posted 17 February 2019 - 08:52 PM

Thanks everyone for your replies. And yes, I did mean financially but also I think I meant in general eg. time, work, balance etc. I did the goodstart calculator and it says I will still be paying $1000 a week even with the rebate. With this, and rent our outgoing would be more than one weeks wages for me or hubby so one of us would be working for rent and daycare. I do love the daycare bub (2 years) is at. They have just been amazing from the start. I also do feel being home with 2 young kids (1 and 3 when I go back) would also be tough for a young adult. My oldest likes to be kept busy.  I'll try work on the part-time, but I don't think it will be easy. Thanks again :)

#12 EmmDasher

Posted 17 February 2019 - 09:01 PM

By the time you have bub 2 and they get to daycare you might find that you don’t have the double fees for a long time.

While it is a lot you’re not just working for daycare/rent. You’re working for super, maintaining your skills, keeping a job (you love?), getting time to use the skills you worked hard for, socializing with adults, etc etc.

We had double daycare for 2 years and it hurt but was maneagable. I worked 4 days per week and had a day at home with the kids.

#13 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 17 February 2019 - 09:04 PM

I went back part time and we got a nanny. Not an au-pair, just a local nanny. She has a certificate in child care.

For us, with two kids close in age, and very little or no rebate, it’s almost break even. It would be break even if she worked less hours a day. Plus, she cooks dinner, plus I don’t have to get the kids up and ready first thing in the morning, there are no drop offs, she will even tidy up if she gets time, so the extra cost is worth it!

For $1000 a week, if you could sort it so the nanny was only there 7-8 hours a day, you could definitely break even too. .

Careful with full time nannies though, once you hire someone fulltime I think you are legally obliged to pay them super and annual leave and the like. (Although plenty of off the books arrangements exist, but I have heard of both employers and nannies getting audited by the tax department)

And yeah, one wage will go just on childcare, but that’s just what it costs these days. It’s not forever. (Unless you choose private schools, lol)

#14 Mands09

Posted 17 February 2019 - 09:34 PM

I had 3 childcare age last year. One went to preschool at an early learning centre and the other two would have been daycare.

We lost the rebate with the changes last year so I decided to get s nanny instead. Cost was equivalent, less stress for me and she is awesome with the kids and has child care certs and first aid.

#15 Hands Up

Posted 18 February 2019 - 07:08 AM

We both work full time and at first we had a nanny three days and daycare two days. Our nanny was cheaper than daycare for two kids as we don’t get the subsidy plus she was amazing. Sadly she moved away and we bit the bullet and got an au pair as our youngest is now 3.5. It’s working well but is a massive change to our household. Our au pair is 25 and has childcare experience. We didn’t want a 19 year old it’s just too much responsibility to do three full days.

#16 Beancat

Posted 18 February 2019 - 09:35 AM

View Postsro, on 17 February 2019 - 08:52 PM, said:

Thanks everyone for your replies. And yes, I did mean financially but also I think I meant in general eg. time, work, balance etc. I did the goodstart calculator and it says I will still be paying $1000 a week even with the rebate. With this, and rent our outgoing would be more than one weeks wages for me or hubby so one of us would be working for rent and daycare. I do love the daycare bub (2 years) is at. They have just been amazing from the start. I also do feel being home with 2 young kids (1 and 3 when I go back) would also be tough for a young adult. My oldest likes to be kept busy.  I'll try work on the part-time, but I don't think it will be easy. Thanks again :)

you are entitled to request flexible arrangements upon returning to work if you the carer of school aged children or younger.  this is one of the Fairwork Australia principles.  You have to request in writing and the business has to respond in writing within a specified period and if they reject your request must have very sound business related reasons

ETA - check out the FWA website it is all there

Edited by Beancat, 18 February 2019 - 09:35 AM.


#17 liveworkplay

Posted 18 February 2019 - 09:51 AM

View Postsro, on 17 February 2019 - 08:52 PM, said:

Thanks everyone for your replies. And yes, I did mean financially but also I think I meant in general eg. time, work, balance etc. I did the goodstart calculator and it says I will still be paying $1000 a week even with the rebate. With this, and rent our outgoing would be more than one weeks wages for me or hubby so one of us would be working for rent and daycare.

This was me when we had 2 in daycare and one in school (so after/before school care and vacation care. The only reason it pid for me to work was to keep my skills up. Financially, it made little sense.

#18 Beancat

Posted 18 February 2019 - 10:01 AM

Another reason to keep working if you can apart from keeping your skills up is the contributions into super.

I feel your pain. For me the ideal work fraction was 3.5 days but I ended up doing 4, which tipped me over a tax bracket so I was basically working a day a fortnight for nothing but added stress

Just think, when the kids are out of day care its like you have won the lotto

We did the au pair thing too.  Not sure I would recommend it.  We had a great experience, average experience and a nightmare.  the au pairs seem to want more and more, if if you don't live near the beach or the cbd they are not interested, most seem to want to come out to aus for a party and have little interest in caring for children

#19 just roses

Posted 18 February 2019 - 10:20 AM

Firstly, think of the cost as spread across both you and your partner. So $500 each. It's still excessive, but it's not a cost that relates to just one income. It's a shared expense of having children.

Secondly, work out the cost/benefit of working PT. Three days a week daycare is still expensive and you'll have lost the extra two days of income. But you might save in other ways. For instance less costs in takeaway because the home days give you time to cook meals etc.

Thirdly, if you're coping fine now with FT work and childcare, don't assume it will be significantly harder with two kids. GIve it a go, and perhaps consider part time down the track. Personally, I think it's easier to work FT when kids are little. PT can be more useful when they're at school and the hours aren't kind on working parents.

Good luck!

#20 Moukmouk

Posted 18 February 2019 - 10:46 AM

View Postjust roses, on 18 February 2019 - 10:20 AM, said:

Firstly, think of the cost as spread across both you and your partner. So $500 each. It's still excessive, but it's not a cost that relates to just one income. It's a shared expense of having children.

Secondly, work out the cost/benefit of working PT. Three days a week daycare is still expensive and you'll have lost the extra two days of income. But you might save in other ways. For instance less costs in takeaway because the home days give you time to cook meals etc.

Thirdly, if you're coping fine now with FT work and childcare, don't assume it will be significantly harder with two kids. GIve it a go, and perhaps consider part time down the track. Personally, I think it's easier to work FT when kids are little. PT can be more useful when they're at school and the hours aren't kind on working parents.

Good luck!

This. I actually wished I'd worked a bit more when they were both in daycare. Early years of primary school is when it's good to have a bit more time up your sleeve. Yes, It's a lot of money, but the benefits are in keeping your hand in, earning super etc. Having said that, if I had to do it now (as I wouldn't get any rebate) I would get a nanny. Even now with no rebate for afterschool care and two of them I pay a babysitter instead, and they get to come home rather than OOSH that they didn't like

#21 Beancat

Posted 18 February 2019 - 11:03 AM

Thirdly, if you're coping fine now with FT work and childcare, don't assume it will be significantly harder with two kids. GIve it a go, and perhaps consider part time down the track. Personally, I think it's easier to work FT when kids are little. PT can be more useful when they're at school and the hours aren't kind on working parents.

Good luck!

yes this - once they are in primary school part time is much better - we are really struggling now with all of the out of school stuff. I wish I could work about 0.7 across 5 days and finish at 3pm each day but I have changed jobs to work closer and we just cant afford it

#22 lizzzard

Posted 18 February 2019 - 07:38 PM

View Postsro, on 17 February 2019 - 08:52 PM, said:

I did the goodstart calculator and it says I will still be paying $1000 a week even with the rebate. With this, and rent our outgoing would be more than one weeks wages for me or hubby so one of us would be working for rent and daycare.

Or....you're paying 50% of your income in rent and daycare, and your DH the same. I know it seems alot, but I don't think its that unusual?

#23 ~river song~

Posted 18 February 2019 - 07:48 PM

Geezus how much is your daycare a day? Your income must be pretty high. I had 2 in daycare for a couple of years and was around $250-$300 a week I think with us both working and decent money
Look into family daycare OP often a bit cheaper as paying by the hour rather than the day

#24 sam2989

Posted 18 February 2019 - 08:02 PM

View Post~river song~, on 18 February 2019 - 07:48 PM, said:

Geezus how much is your daycare a day? Your income must be pretty high. I had 2 in daycare for a couple of years and was around $250-$300 a week I think with us both working and decent money
Look into family daycare OP often a bit cheaper as paying by the hour rather than the day

Not OP but I’m looking at between $125-$140 a day before rebates for one child.  The rebate will depend on if I work 5 days (60%) rebate or 4 days (65%). So it’s going to be around $330 for 5 days or $200 for 4. Sydney prices are insane and honestly my area is reasonable enough compared to some.

#25 EmmDasher

Posted 18 February 2019 - 08:03 PM

Riversong that’s exceptionally cheap. I assume the OP is in inner Sydney or Melbourne or even parts of Brisbane where daycare can be $150 or more a day per child. She said $1000 plus rent is more than a wage for either her or her partner so neither is an exceptionally high earner (unless they’re paying thousands in rent)

OP, have you double checked that the Goodstart calculator was correct and took into account the subsidy? Would $1000 be the total cost of care or your share? If $1000 is your share for 2 kids, 5 days/wk it sounds like full fee price is at least $200 a day per child or even more if you’re at the lower end of the income banding. I assume your numbers are right but it’s always worth checking in case something has gone wrong.

Edited by EmmDasher, 18 February 2019 - 08:05 PM.





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