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No babbling nine month old - how can I help?


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#1 Hummingbird82

Posted 20 February 2019 - 09:01 AM

Hello,

Our DD is nine months old and has never babbled. She has an older brother who has moderate ASD and also never babbled. I'm babbling to her, reading books, making animal and car sounds, showing her videos of her cousin babbling but she's just not doing it. She makes sounds like ah and oh. She appears to interact well socially, she smiles, responds to her name and claps and waves (my ds never did these things).

Does anyone have any suggestions to help her get babbling? Any toys/dolls?

I will get speech therapy for her if she is delayed in her speech like my son, but am open to any suggestions if I'm missing anything!

Thank you

#2 cabbage88

Posted 20 February 2019 - 12:06 PM

Have you seen the App ASD detect? Awesome awesome app designed by la trobe uni for detecting ASD in 6 months-3 years. We had a similar issue, helping us get on top of it now which is wonderful. Assuming there's no suspected auditory issues?
Just a thought if she had a sibling with ASD. Sorry not exactly what you were asking.

#3 Pooks Combusted

Posted 20 February 2019 - 01:14 PM

I’d get a hearing test and referral to community speech therapy. My son started speech therapy at 12 months and they taught him to point. And it rolled on from there. I do believe that early support made a big difference to our family functioning.

#4 mayahlb

Posted 20 February 2019 - 01:36 PM

My son with ASD also never babbled. I think first port of call is to get her hearing checked and then see about a referral to speech therapy. I’m trying to remember  what we did. I think we did lots of simple sentences. Single words with visuals and animal sounds mostly. Not really demonstrating babble but real language. Babble is mostly the attempt to make these words. Or they just like their own voice.

One of my nieces with asd also didn’t babble. She was this quiet toddler, so quiet. And then around 2 she suddenly just started talking in full long sentences... so no babble doesn’t necessarily mean speech will be delayed. But it’s better to start early (though our speech won’t start until 18months minimum)

#5 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 20 February 2019 - 02:09 PM

Singing is also really good for language development.

#6 PrincessPeach

Posted 20 February 2019 - 07:58 PM

I'd be getting a hearing test done first & then a visit with a speech therapist to get their opinion.

My eldest never babbled much & has been in speech therapy since 2yrs 4month, that was early enough intervention for him.

#7 barrington

Posted 20 February 2019 - 08:17 PM

View Postmayahlb, on 20 February 2019 - 01:36 PM, said:

One of my nieces with asd also didn’t babble. She was this quiet toddler, so quiet. And then around 2 she suddenly just started talking in full long sentences... so no babble doesn’t necessarily mean speech will be delayed. But it’s better to start early (though our speech won’t start until 18months minimum)
This is my DD1.  Less than 10 words at 2 years and no babbling at all.  Full sentences by 2.5 yrs with no intervention.

#8 *molly*

Posted 20 February 2019 - 08:42 PM

Definitely get a hearing test done.

You’re doing all great things. Watch closely to see where her attention is and describe what she sees in single words.

As another piece of anecdata reassurance, my DS didn’t babble until 11 months. He’s now almost 3 and has excellent language skills, speaks extremely clearly, and has great social skills.

#9 Hummingbird82

Posted 20 February 2019 - 09:23 PM

View Postcabbage88, on 20 February 2019 - 12:06 PM, said:

Have you seen the App ASD detect? Awesome awesome app designed by la trobe uni for detecting ASD in 6 months-3 years. We had a similar issue, helping us get on top of it now which is wonderful. Assuming there's no suspected auditory issues?
Just a thought if she had a sibling with ASD. Sorry not exactly what you were asking.

Thank you for this. I downloaded the app and they said she's currently too young and to do the test when she's 11 months old, which I will do.

#10 Hummingbird82

Posted 20 February 2019 - 09:28 PM

Thank you for the suggestions of the hearing test and also the anecdotal stories about children who did talk without babbling first.

It was funny that I posted this today because I met a mum with a nine month old girl - one week older than my DD and she was babbling away. My DD just stared and smiled at her but didn't make any noises. When I smiled and interacted with the other girl she responded and babbled. In a way it was very helpful because I could see how different my DD was and that it's not anything I'm not doing, because this other baby responded to me like babies should. I think it dawned on me that I probably do have another baby with ASD but at least I know how to navigate the system and have some great therapists through my son's early intervention. A very useful chance meeting!

#11 PandoBox

Posted 21 February 2019 - 12:40 PM

View PostHummingbird82, on 20 February 2019 - 09:28 PM, said:

Thank you for the suggestions of the hearing test and also the anecdotal stories about children who did talk without babbling first.

It was funny that I posted this today because I met a mum with a nine month old girl - one week older than my DD and she was babbling away. My DD just stared and smiled at her but didn't make any noises. When I smiled and interacted with the other girl she responded and babbled. In a way it was very helpful because I could see how different my DD was and that it's not anything I'm not doing, because this other baby responded to me like babies should. I think it dawned on me that I probably do have another baby with ASD but at least I know how to navigate the system and have some great therapists through my son's early intervention. A very useful chance meeting!

I think its great that you're alert and looking at all the signs/ ready to take early intervention i... but I don't think you should assume that just because this other baby responded differently that your baby has ASD.. they are all different and develop at different rates.
DD didn't point at her last check up...and apparently she was meant to...after all ..all 12-13 month olds should be pointing and not pointing is a marker.. she turned 14m and was pointing at everything.. and she's still pointing and asking me to tell her whats what.

#12 Hummingbird82

Posted 22 February 2019 - 10:13 AM

View PostPandoBox, on 21 February 2019 - 12:40 PM, said:



I think its great that you're alert and looking at all the signs/ ready to take early intervention i... but I don't think you should assume that just because this other baby responded differently that your baby has ASD.. they are all different and develop at different rates.
DD didn't point at her last check up...and apparently she was meant to...after all ..all 12-13 month olds should be pointing and not pointing is a marker.. she turned 14m and was pointing at everything.. and she's still pointing and asking me to tell her whats what.

Thank you PandoBox :-) I guess not all babies work to the schedule the professionals say they should! I'll try and relax a bit. What will be, will be!

#13 *bucket*

Posted 22 February 2019 - 04:54 PM

My DD didn't babble either. My DS was in speech therapy so, after another hearing test showed no problems (DD had an ABR at about 4 months due to making no sounds), his speechie did an assessment. I think DD was around 12 months at the time.

Speechie did recommend therapy, but commented that DD wasn't imitating anything at the time and actions would come before sounds. So, for example, if we banged our hand on the table, DD wouldn't copy, if we clapped, DD didn't. Apparently most kids will imitate at that age.

DD got lost somewhere on the waiting list and didn't get found until she was almost 3 (I wasn't worried by then or I would have chased up). She had another speech assessment and all was well, with no intervention required.

My older DS has ASD, and DD has some traits but not enough for a diagnosis.

Edited by *bucket*, 22 February 2019 - 04:55 PM.


#14 cabbage88

Posted 22 February 2019 - 05:08 PM

View PostHummingbird82, on 20 February 2019 - 09:28 PM, said:

Thank you for the suggestions of the hearing test and also the anecdotal stories about children who did talk without babbling first.

It was funny that I posted this today because I met a mum with a nine month old girl - one week older than my DD and she was babbling away. My DD just stared and smiled at her but didn't make any noises. When I smiled and interacted with the other girl she responded and babbled. In a way it was very helpful because I could see how different my DD was and that it's not anything I'm not doing, because this other baby responded to me like babies should. I think it dawned on me that I probably do have another baby with ASD but at least I know how to navigate the system and have some great therapists through my son's early intervention. A very useful chance meeting!

That's so good. It was kind of a shock to realise it with my son but also really validating because I just had this really really strong feeling from around 8 months. He has a twin sister and I could see the difference, and there was just something about him that reminded me so much of my older ASD brother. At least I know early so with intervention I know his life has a much better chance of being easier than it was for my poor brother who was diagnosed at 30.
And I love him this way... I just can't see it as a disorder. Like my brother, he's so beautiful and sweet and just so different that I love him this way.

#15 blueskies12

Posted 22 February 2019 - 07:19 PM

OP, well done for being on top of things with your daughter and putting it out there, so to speak. My first-born was diagnosed with ASD and it has also made me look more closely at my second son (14 months). No real advice on the babbling, but I am now more willing to seek out assessments in the near future, where before I would just think I just was the case of being an OTT Mum.

#16 HippyDippyBaloney

Posted 22 February 2019 - 07:59 PM

I’m a speech pathologist. I agree with hearing test and referral to a speechie. Lack of babbling is something to be aware of, and shouldn’t be shrugged off so easily (I don’t mean to be alarmist, but it’s importance is often overlooked).




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